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Cosmolo

English setters ETA- And English Pointers?

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Cosmolo   

Does anyone here own or have experience with English setters? I know a few that have led me to put them at the top of our list for our next dog and have contacted the breeder of the one I currently know well- I’ll be meeting her dogs in the future and chatting to her further about them. 
 

But I’d love to here other people experiences with them to see if my experiences are typical. They’re quite different to anything we have had before.

 

Keen to know the good and the bad! 

Edited by Cosmolo
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kamuzz   

What would you like to know specifically?

 

Like most dogs, your choice of breeder will affect the sort of dog you get. One of mine is a complete couch potato and the other is far more active.  (Neither were officially "working lines".)

There is some grooming involved. You have to be prepared to deal with that feathering.

 

And the slobber. :)  Again, that varies dog to dog. My couch potato slobbers. Mr Activity - hardly ever. 

 

For me, they were a good mid-sized breed. I didn't want another GSD because of all the health problems associated with that breed. 

 

Although walking them can be funny. I've had them called everything from cocker spaniels to afghans. 

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Cosmolo   

I’d be keen to know about any health or temperament concerns or considerations. 
 

I am familiar with the grooming and have both a good pro groomer and the ability to do basics myself (I have groomed one of the setters I know).

 

They are very different to our previous breed choices- ACDs and JRTs so that’s my only hesitation- having something not as ‘sharp’ though our current ACD bitch is simply too sharp and the reason why we are looking at other breeds. We have a 15 month old son and also need a dog that is stable enough to work with me (dog training) which our ACD bitch can’t do. She also has ED and HD as did a previous large cross breed dog so health issues are a bit consideration for us. 

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Dogsfevr   

Depends what you mean by stable enough to work with me (dog training )
ES aren't stupid but there very much a "why" breed  & are very sensitive souls ,they should be a happy go lucky breed but owners mindful of there sensitivity.
My current boy would be way to switched on for the average pet owner & is polar opposite to all the others i have owned which ranged from lazy ,to i may make an effort ,its a bit hot to go outside but known stupid .
You simply need to adapt your mannerism to a more sensitive breed that tends to take things more to heart .
They can be insanely needy & not always deal well when there human leave ,it is very important to teach ES as puppies self independence even after that effort you may end up with a very needy dog & its just an aspect of the breed people need to be prepared for .
Whilst they can & do compete in dog sports anyone who does compete does so with a great sense of humor & a realistic attitude that you may suffer more fails than passes at times hence the "why" aspect.
Grooming can vary again so much .
Health wise breeding stock is tested for hips/elbows,baer & maybe thyroid .
All puppies should be BAER tested around 6/8 weeks .
Epilepsy can appear occasionally .

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Cosmolo   

Great info, thanks. I don’t want another dog that is lightning fast and as quick to arousal as my ACD. She also lacks predictability and this combined with the speed of her reactions to various things requires careful management (we’ve had ACDs before who were more even tempered and predictable- this one does have ED and HD which I consider a contributor to her behaviour as well)

 

The above factors make using her for work related demonstrations,  assisting in socialisation and being able to let other people handle her (under supervision) quite difficult or impossible. 
 

For example, whilst our Jack Russell might not do what someone else asks him to do, he’s never going to not comply in a way that creates risk for the person. The ACD might. I don’t need a dog to be mindlessly obedient, I just need their disobedience to be more humorous than risky. I don’t compete my dogs so they don’t need to ‘not make mistakes’ as such.  
 

When you say needy, would you say prone to more serious separation anxiety or just a bit clingy?

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kamuzz   

In our house there are three dogs:

- Mazda-  11 - ES

- Choc - 7 - GSD - the brains of the pack :rofl:

- Veli - 6 - ES

 

Mazda came to  us from his breeder aged about 18 months. He had lived on a farm and never been inside a house. For the first two days he wouldn't come inside. Then he walked in and that was it. Somehow he was house trained from the get-go, even though the breeder said he wouldn't be. He is a real couch potato but very food motivated. He has learnt to sit and drop.  His only health issues have been food related. (Let's eat anything we find lying around.) Wouldn't describe him as sensitive or needy.

 

Veli came to us from his breeder aged about 14 months. He is completely bird obsessed and spends most of his time trying to ensure there are no wild birds in our garden. We had to fence off the grevillea growing along our back fence because he kept breaking them. Veli will stay out in the rain (birds do after all); get really cold; come inside and climb into Mazda's crate with Mazda to dry off; and then go back outside again. Veli has never learnt to sit. And he is the fussiest eater I have ever met. From time to time he may get an ear infection. I blame the amount of time he spends diving onto the grass to catch a bird. Not particular sensitive or needy unless you count a thunder phobia.

 

Maybe mine aren't needy/sensitive because there are three of them, and they calm each other down?

 

If you like ,  message me your facebook link and I can invite you to the English Setter group.

Maz&Veli.gif

Edited by kamuzz

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Dogsfevr   
4 hours ago, Cosmolo said:

When you say needy, would you say prone to more serious separation anxiety or just a bit clingy?

Sep anxiety can certainly happen if self independence isn’t encouraged ,remember this is a breed that is loyal to its master by job .

My current ES would not go off with someone else to be handled ,my others would but always keeping a keen eye out for there owner .

Simple facts that is one to the potential pros/cons of the breed there either happy on there own or there not .

My others would but ES love there family and can be very devoted .

They can be barkers and retain there bird working traits well .When birds are around they switch to bird mode quickly without anything distracting them .Mine is bird obsessed ,

I would look at going to some of the ES club of Victoria’s social days .plys there are some big shows coming up where the entries should be good and to see some variety ,

I have been involved with the breed since the 90’s .

Kamuzz I think you will find yours are sensitive but you know how to be around the breed  and you don’t think about .

For many who have been around tough/hardy breeds people often under estimate there need to change to another breed .

All my ES where confident dogs but they still all had that sensitive side which is what makes them ES  and different to there other Setter family .

 

Slobber is a part ,the more flewy they are the more slobber you will get all through the house and your clothes .

A lot of joe public hate the slobber 

 

 

 

Edited by Dogsfevr

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kamuzz   
1 hour ago, Dogsfevr said:

Slobber is a part ,the more flesh they are the more slobber you will get all through the house and your clothes .

A lot of joe public hate the slobber 

 

Yes! And in such unexpected places too. Like the cornices or the actual ceiling itself.  

 

Mine actually know "I'm clean" means don't come near me. Generally because I am dressed for work or church and would like to arrive there in a reasonable state.

  • Haha 3

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denali   

I've never lived with one, but I have a pair that come into my daycare 3-4 times per week and i LOVE them. 
They've also been added to my list of potential breeds. 

They are goofy, fun, eager to please and very jovial. 
The male is larger, has a lot more flew and slobber and i'm not sure how much he has going on upstairs :laugh: but he is the sweetest dog. 
His female companion is a lot smarter and more independant. Both VERY birdy.

Plus they're pretty to look at :laugh:

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Cosmolo   

Thanks for all of the information. The client Setter i have comes and stays at my place regularly and I think he's great- I only actually noticed the slobber after reading about it- then I started to notice he does slobber but that doesn't bother me. 

 

Do any of you have experience with English Pointers? Any thoughts on the differences (behaviour and temperament) between the two breeds?

 

I think I've joined the English Setter group though i'm not sure if there is more than one?

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Dogsfevr   

I have lots of experience with Pointers .

Pointers have similarities  but thrive more in the all round dog sport area .

They are gentle,birdy,love to stand upright on you ,love there humans ,the beach 

They are another great under estimated breed .

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I LOVE (English) Pointers. No idea of the comparison between them and setters but if I was ever to get a big dog again it would be another Pointer. Soft and sweet and clever, active but also happy to take up the whole lounge. I don't know why more people don't have them. 

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The working lines of both breeds differ significantly - similar to my working ESS vs show type. Less coat, a bit smaller, less exaggerated features and lovely work ethic. I’d have a working English Pointer from a particular breeder in an instant if I had the time. Soft, sweet temperaments. He offered me one for nothing because he wanted to see me train it but having just had a litter I’ve got a Springer keeper on my hands :)

 

Good luck!

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