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Deeds

Cluster Seizures in Dog

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Deeds   

We adopted a dog when he was 14 months old.  The dog was sold to the previous owner as a pure bred with a pedigree.  We have always had this one breed of dog so we thought this dog wasn't pure bred.  That's not a problem as he is a lovely dog.

 

It turns out that out of 10 pups in the litter at least 5 have cluster seizures .  He didn't start having seizures until he was nearly 5 years old.  For the past 2 years he has had cluster seizures almost monthly and sometimes more.  The problem is the post ictal period after the seizures.  It lasts for up to 3 days where he just paces and paces and tries to get out doors & windows etc.  It's a nightmare for him & a nightmare for us.  Sometimes he can have 5 seizures in a day despite the medication.

 

The anti seizure pills make him hungry, thirsty etc.  Then there is the medication has to be given 8 hourly so depending on when he has the fit we are often up @ 3am to complete the 8 hour turnaround.

 

And because he has cluster seizures we sleep with one eye & one ear open in case we have to medicate him with seizure medication again.  So it's stressful for everyone.

 

We absolutely adore this dog but we are at the end of our patience with the seizures.  We have been to a vet neurologist & have adjusted his medication several times.

 

We are thinking of having him PTS because it's just so difficult.  We are aware we can't cure the seizures but we have done our best to manage them but sadly that doesn't appear to be working as well as it did previously. 

 

We feel really bad about this because we think we have failed the dog.  Whoever bred this dog must have known one of the parents suffered seizures.  The breeder owned both purebred dogs that mated.

 

What a sad story this is for the poor dogs and the owners.  We took him so he would have a wonderful forever home and now he has this problem.

 

It just breaks my heart to know that someone knowingly bred with an epileptic dog.

 

 

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Snook   

I'm so sorry. What a devastating situation for all of you. I don't have any experience with cluster seizures but from what you've described, it sounds like they not only have a significant impact on your quality of life, but also on the quality of life for your dog. For what it's worth, I don't think you have failed this dog at all. I don't know if there may be treatment options that would be better for your dog, and someone else may be able to help with that but if there aren't, it's likely I would make the same decision to PTS if I was in the same situation. 

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1 hour ago, Deeds said:

It's a nightmare for him ......

This is the part of your very very sad post that stands out for me.  You have tried very hard, you have totally loved and cared for this dog for several years.

 

What your dog goes through is so hard for him and so hard for you.  

 

You have not failed him if you decide to let him go.   

 

:heart:  :heart:  :heart:

Edited by Loving my Oldies
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Dogsfevr   

Has the dogs thyroid levels been checked at .?
 

As for your thoughts on PTS I 100% support your thought .

A friend has been through the same scenario after a brain fungus issue  the quality of life was not there and the after seizure behaviour was becoming more and more dangerous to the dog and the humans.

They tried all options but there was no help 

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Boronia   

Hi Deeds,

I feel that you have posted here to reinforce the decision you are close to making.  It appears you cannot have tried harder to help your boy.   There comes a time to say goodbye and though it will break your heart, your boy is not happy and you will need to make your decision soon.

If there was an end to his seizures in sight or if the medications are working you would have good reason to continue but he seems to be getting worse.

Remember...it's all about the dog and his happy life, he doesn't have one at this time.

Most of us here have said goodbye to our besties, and though it's hard we all know that it is the last thank you for being in my life we have given them.

B

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Deeds   

Thanks everyone for your supportive comments.  The trouble is between seizures  he has a wonderful life with his best friend at home and his friends at the park. He has 2-3 walks a day & loves his life.He's a very smart dog & has a great sense of humour.

If he just had 1 seizure per. month and no post ictal that would be a lot easier to deal with.  

I have always had pedigree dogs.  Dealing with one lot of inherited disorders is hard enough to deal with but dealing with two lots is much harder and unpredictable.

I usually have 3 Giants at the same time so I am familiar with having to put dogs to sleep .  Usually when they have a terminal illness.  We had our old girl (16yrs ) put to sleep in November last year.

Even when you are expecting it 's not an easy thing to do.  I have had 9 Giants over a 30 year period & have never had to put a dog to sleep for a reason such as this.  

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Rebanne   

I'm another who would do as you are going to do Deeds. :heart:

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It's a difficult decision to make with any dog.  If it helps, I would also make the same decision. 

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Tassie   

No direct experience, though a couple of dog world friends have epi dogs … they have been able to find a combo of meds which have seemed to give the dog very long periods seizure free … but it seems to be a matter of chance as much as anything whether a combo of meds can be found which can give continued quality of life.   And although, I have had to make decisions about a few dogs, thankfully, none have been in this situation ..but truly, I think the possibility of long term quality of life for the dog has to be a very strong determining factor in whether to PTS.   I feel so sad for you being faced with this tough decision, but a decision made with the best interests of the dog in mind can't be the wrong decision, IMHO.

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