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Stitch

Help with excited behaviour please

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Stitch   

Thanks for the videos which I will review shortly.   I have been challenged with excitable and sometimes aggressive terriers for many years as well as having my share of large dogs so I am not new to this but this particular dog is off the scale with excitability and he combines it with being a 40kg flying missile sometimes, so it's like terriers on steroids but one you can't pick up or manipulate.  Eg. yesterday he was doing his loops on/off the dog bed and he flicked the dog bed hard into my shin bone.  I have a big bruise today and walk with a limp!:scared:

Dogsfevr can you tell me how you are training your problem dog?  My boy is almost 12 months old now so roughly the same age.

Edited by Stitch
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Stitch   

OK I watched those videos thank you!   Home School the Dog.  I have done about 6 weeks of lessons on that but got a bit lost wondering how I was going to adapt it to the type of excitable behaviour he has.   We have a lot of land here and I don't have any trouble with his recall....except that I might get bowled over when he comes galloping in!  :eek:

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Dogsfevr   
13 hours ago, Stitch said:

Thanks for the videos which I will review shortly.   I have been challenged with excitable and sometimes aggressive terriers for many years as well as having my share of large dogs so I am not new to this but this particular dog is off the scale with excitability and he combines it with being a 40kg flying missile sometimes, so it's like terriers on steroids but one you can't pick up or manipulate.  Eg. yesterday he was doing his loops on/off the dog bed and he flicked the dog bed hard into my shin bone.  I have a big bruise today and walk with a limp!:scared:

Dogsfevr can you tell me how you are training your problem dog?  My boy is almost 12 months old now so roughly the same age.

Its  not mine but a dog i have regular contact with .
But i do own large dogs & like you certain behaviours just arent suitable when uncontrolled .
This scenario is hard because there"s the lets make excuses side,a trainer who said its screwed up because it flew on a plane :banghead: & my thoughts its a beautiful,smart dog who craves attention in one way,hasn't been allowed a certain degree off freedom to learn (not feral ,do what you want freedom but an ability to learn kind off freedom instead of controlled & then confused)
This dog is a body slammer & no fun what so ever .The trainer /behaviourist method to the family was grab a chair ,get the dog to focus & suck food from a syringe to re instill breast feeding .
The dog has no idea how to sit still,be calm ,switch off something i pointed out very early they needed to manage ,instead they would walk it,walk it some more let it dive bomb & they loss control as the dog was so amped up .
So i gave my thoughts ,the dog at present works in one speed ,teaching it to chill is like going cold turkey for an alcoholic so my thoughts is to learn to get a response in speed mode,get some focus in speed mode & as the dog is working the reward is the calm mode slowly working the dog to chill reward without pushing the human touchy feely .This dog luvs brain games ,spin,touch,paw shake & walking backwards ,Withing 2 mins its tired & the next phase of calm starts ,the last time i saw it it just wanted to dive bomb me so just told it what i wanted ,it did that & the dog stopped jumping & was switched on learning without the battle .Back to front method but could be very successful if the family where all 100% on the same page
Personally as its not my dog & im just offering my two bobs worth i don't think the success will be as good as it could be because some just find a reason .for the bad manners  & its alright .

I totally get your frustration its no fun & you get battle fatigued from just thinking about why something so simple is so hard but if you can find the one "moment" thing you will seriously get success quickly

 

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Stitch   

Dogsfevr, agree....after so many years of having to think out of the box with terrier training I have to start thinking differently with this dog.  I spent years trying to explain to obedience class instructors that terriers are totally different to train than say a working dog or whatever.

Now I feel that those years of training are counting against me as I am stuck in 'terrier' mode....if that makes sense.

I have this dog walking calmly on a lead which was my initial goal....but it has to be on lead.

I tried giving him a big box to investigate yesterday as I think he needs to use his brain a bit more to tire him out.   He really enjoyed it.

Your idea of giving him more brain games is one I will start today and see how he goes.  Thank you for your help.

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Oh, Stitch.... I feel it ! With a large breed it can be physically dangerous for you as well . :( Glad he enjoyed 'thinking inside the box "  ;) Hopefully some more brain games will help give him a focus elsewhere.... 

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Dogsfevr   
1 hour ago, Stitch said:

Dogsfevr, agree....after so many years of having to think out of the box with terrier training I have to start thinking differently with this dog.  I spent years trying to explain to obedience class instructors that terriers are totally different to train than say a working dog or whatever.

Now I feel that those years of training are counting against me as I am stuck in 'terrier' mode....if that makes sense.

I have this dog walking calmly on a lead which was my initial goal....but it has to be on lead.

I tried giving him a big box to investigate yesterday as I think he needs to use his brain a bit more to tire him out.   He really enjoyed it.

Your idea of giving him more brain games is one I will start today and see how he goes.  Thank you for your help.

Even with leash training you can get creative which again is using brain games,self control & in a some what sly why teaching focus and respect on you without it being the boring same old same that they switch off .

Pool noodles make fabulous training tools to create interesting walkways where the dog & you have to work as a team but also allowing the dog to problem solve .
The dog above is terrible onleash so they opted for the easy option of the offleash park so it turned into "free for all brain" at an age i think is crucial for building a relationship .
That will take time more time than it should have .

Maybe even look at search n seek games in the backyard .

Some dogs brain just works overtime & no doubt there a challenge but the trick is you wont win a battle so you need to switch to other options .
Boxes with treats inside ,hide n seek ,even teaching catch requires self control

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