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help with choosing the right puppy


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I live on a large property. My partner and I are retired and are very active hobby farmers. We are looking to get a puppy and there are Kelpie x Jack Russel available or Cattle dog x. We have a 9 month old granddaughter who visits regularly. I read some report that Kelpie and Jack Russel are not good breeds to have around children. Somewhere else I read that Cattle dogs are not good around children..... any advise from the experts?

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You would need excellent fencing to start with and I'd most likely have some sort of escape proof yard for the dog to be in when you make trips into town. As for being ok with children then that would mainly be up to you and the training you do with pup and baby as she grows. Herding dogs can sometimes try and herd children and cattle dogs are bred to nip the legs of cattle. Some Kelpies can be nippy on stock as well. Terriers are usually bred to hunt vermin. So yes, the potential is there for some issues.

But the same could be said for every dog. It truly is up to you.

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Having been a cattle dog owner in the past, I would say go with that pup, but I am biased.  As Rebanne said, it is up to you to put in the work to shape the dog.  Both my cattle dogs were excellent with all kids and never tried to round them up or nip them but they were never left unsupervised with them either.  Good luck with your choice.

 

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How have the pups been raised,what have they been exposed too.

What are you expecting from the dog in general life ,

Are you wanting busy brain,laid back,outside/inside .

 

From a boarding kennels owner we find Cattle dogs an issue especially poorly raised ones .

What is ACD crossed with 

Kelpies have all been a joy but neither off your choices are pure 

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Both these pups will be quick-thinking / high energy dogs .If you have animals on yr acreage, expect them to be chased/herded.
 What is the cattledog crossed with ? 
Excellent fences and LOTS of training are musts !!

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Regardless of what you decide, check out Family Paws Parent Education (website, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube), Stop the 77 (YouTube) and Resiner Veterinary Behaviour Services (Facebook). Lots of essential information to help you keep your dog and grand daughter safe.

 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ngDhO3FZQk4&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR1WbyBdky5pCcjVusyzpaUVp7PQSEjmynbTwaPQ8WQmdcQ2QpwsfwyNofM

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On 25/01/2021 at 9:29 AM, persephone said:

Both these pups will be quick-thinking / high energy dogs .If you have animals on yr acreage, expect them to be chased/herded.
 What is the cattledog crossed with ? 
Excellent fences and LOTS of training are musts !!

 

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Thank you for all the replies - not so familar with the site.

the puppies are 75% cattle dog and some bull arab (probably). we have cows on the property and lots of wildlife such as wallabies and goannas ...  perhaps I should find a Labrador x - might be less trouble

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Why  lab X? Why any cross? Regardless of breed they will all need excellent fences and excellent training. Labs are a working breed as well with strong intelligence.

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1 hour ago, E.M. said:

Thank you for all the replies - not so familar with the site.

the puppies are 75% cattle dog and some bull arab (probably). we have cows on the property and lots of wildlife such as wallabies and goannas ...  perhaps I should find a Labrador x - might be less trouble

 

My labrador was named Trouble... for a reason... labs can be very smart, very driven, and very easily bored... mine chewed pretty much anything she could get her teeth on as a youngster too... and was expelled from group training for being the naughtiest dog in the park... err! Have a read of the book "Marley and Me" for all the fun that can be in store when getting a Labrador... lol!

 

Rgardless what breed or cross you decide to welcome into your family, it is going to need plenty of obedience training and socialisation if you want to end up with a perfect family pet... and that will be up to you...

 

T.

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2 hours ago, E.M. said:

I should find a Labrador x - might be less trouble

We have shot labs(not ours)  for killing our sheep :(

ANY dog requires work. Those breeds bred to work obviously will have a higher drive, and so will need more of your attention :) Crosses are less predictable , and can sometimes carry with them the not-so-desirable bits of the breeds  :( Why not seek a purebred dog of a nice settled line ..whose family are quiet .... ? Or an adult rescue who is used to country life ? 

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  • 2 weeks later...

.https://www.petrescue.com.au/listings/835303

With young grandchildren visiting look for a breed less likely to want to chase nip and herd children.

'Bull arabs' will often chase little running children and pull at them; cattle dogs will nip at ankles and toes.

I have owned a cattle dog and two sight hound crosses;one was great with children the other not so good.

A cross of any kind can be a bit of a lucky dip temperament wise so I would advise going with a rescue group where the dog has lived with children and something is known about the dogs temperament.

Otherwise go with a pure breed where there is more predictability as to what to expect with behavior training and grooming.

Some breeds do better with children other animals and visitors to your home so do lots of research into breeds that best suit your lifestyle and expectations.

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It would be helpful to know what you are looking for in a dog.

 

Do you want an indoor dog or an outside dog?   One that can be out of the farm with you all day, or one that will spend most of it's time in and around the house?  Or will you be mixing it up?

 

Do you have a 'backyard' on the property, or is it rural fences only?  And what sort of fencing is on your perimeter?  Are the boundary gates always closed, or will the dog be trained/expected to 'stay home'

 

What is the 'purpose' of the dog?   Do you want it to alert you when strangers arrive, or do something about it?   Do you have foxes you want it to chase off etc?

 

I have seen some amazing crosses, so whilst this is a purebred site, I am not poo-hooing the idea.   But it would be very interesting to know if the pups are farm bred from people with a good reputation (in which case you should be able to find out the work their parents did (or didn't) do and get an idea on potential chase instinct, energy level and work ethic etc).   But if it they are from unknown and unreliable sources, then it will be a total crap shoot about what they are (very rarely is a cross a mix of two breeds - usually dad is 'part something' and looks mostly 'that' and the same with mum - so the 'that'X'this' is actually 4, 5 or 6 (or more) breeds mixed up.  Add Nature V nurture and it can be a real unknown.  Nothing is guaranteed, and I have seen purebreds have very unexpected temperaments - but you have a much better idea

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