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Reverse sneezing appearing after nose bleed


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Thanks for that.  I called the vet today and they gave me the all clear to take the medications.   His itching seemed to have settled down and we haven’t noticed any runny poo except the one of

Had my boy scoped and CT scanned and they found a tumour.  I'm so sad.  Still waiting for biopsy results to come back to see what kind we are dealing with but by the sound of things, it doesn't seem t

That's a great update. 

There is some info on anti itch stuff here Albert Park Vet info

this is a paragraph within that link (with Telfast it's a no-no to use ketoconazole which is an ingredient of Malaseb):

 

OVER-THE-COUNTER ALLERGY DRUGS

You can use over-the-counter antihistamines for your dog's allergies. They can be really quite helpful in some dogs, but they're really unlikely to control an acute or severe flare up. They're often most be useful if started before the time of the year that your dog has a flare up, they then might decrease the need for other medication.

There are two basic categories of antihistamines:

    the older (first generation) ones, which tend to cause drowsiness (in people more than pets) and have a shorter duration of action (but are usually very inexpensive)
    the new (second generation) ones, which cause less sedation and are more anti-inflammatory (but relatively more expensive)

Both sorts can be used safely in dogs, but because people don't always want to be sedated, the second generation ones tend to be the ones on the supermarket and pharmacy shelves.

Here are some antihistamine dosages for dogs:

    dexchlorpheniramine (Polaramine®) – this is a first gen. It is available as 2 or 6 mg tablets. The dose is one 2 mg 2–4 times a day for dogs under 15 kg and one 6 mg tablet 2–4 times a day for dogs over 15 kg

    promethazine (Pherergan®) – this is also a first gen. It is available as 10 and 25 mg tablets and 5 mg/ml elixir. The dose is 1 mg/kg twice daily

    fexofenadine (Telfast®) – this is a second gen. It is available as 60 mg capsules and 120 or 180 mg tablets. The dose is 5–10 mg/kg once or twice daily (don't use if your dog is on ketoconazole or a macrolide antibiotic)

    loratadine (Claratyne®) – also second gen. It is available as 10 mg tablets. The dose is 5–20 mg/dog once daily

    cetirizine (Zyrtec®) – also second gen. It is available as 10 mg tablets and either 1 mg/ml or 10 mg/ml oral solution. The dosage is 5–20 mg/dog once daily

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Thanks for that.  I called the vet today and they gave me the all clear to take the medications.
 

His itching seemed to have settled down and we haven’t noticed any runny poo except the one off on the day he had the big bone.  He has been doing quite well since recovering from the scoping.  I hardly see him sneeze anymore and as a result no mucous discharge or bleeding nose.  He does get the occasional reverse sneeze but that’s still not a frequent occurrence.   
 

I can only hope he stays this way, I’ll be happy.  Thank you everyone for the kind thoughts and suggestions.:heart:

 

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