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health issues desexing a female dog later in life


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Hi,

We are thinking of adopting a dog online who is a pug x, she is 3 years old and not desexed. I've done some googling and can't get a clear answer on long term health issues. I've read there's a big increase chance of cancer. All dogs we have owned have been desexed within the first year so we are in two minds of whether to go for this one. Apparently she couldn't produce any litters for the breeder so she's been sent packing. Anyone advice would be great! thankyou

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Years ago, yes there was the thought that the more seasons a bitch had the higher the risk of mammary cancer. I do not know if that still holds. I've owned several bitches and only had one end up with a very small lump next to a nipple. It was removed but I opted not to send it off.

Nowadays it seems more popular to let the bitch have at least one season, which does help with a heap of things including preventing spey incontinence.

If the dog otherwise suits you I wouldn't let the fact she is yet to be speyed put you off getting her.

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II'm not saying it to be a party pooper sorry but you're doing this online so be careful. There's online scams going on due to demand. Pay a holding deposit and the dog vanishes.

 

At 3, desex her. Everyone is going to have a different experience and I respect that but as rescue I'm kind of tired of mammary tumours and pyometra. 

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Are you suggesting there is a big increase chance of cancer because the dog will have reached three before being neutered? A minor increased risk of mammary cancer probably, but possibly a reduced risk of other diseases- desexing has pros and cons health wise and what they are varies by breed as well as age. There are a few research studies around but generally I’d just say that having reached three entire would probably encourage rather than deter me. Just desex her when you get her.
I would be more cautious about her socialisation history and behaviour. As a pug x she possibly comes from a commercial breeding set up rather than a hobbiest and she might therefor not know how to be a house pet yet. You will need to be prepared for that possibility, not that it should rule her out but she might need some help learning to be a pet. Also as Powerlegs says be aware of scams. 

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Thankyou everyone. I would never give money online, she's is a few hours away. Apparently she wasn't fit for the breeding program, never had a litter, so been treated as a family pet (which now they want gone?). Maltese x pug, a weird looking thing haha think we will find something closer to home anyway.  Thanks for the info regarding desexing older dogs.

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https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fvets.2020.00388/full

 

The health effects of desexing appear to be breed specific.  The above study looked at data from 40,000 dogs, including 383 pugs.  Basically it found little difference between intact and desexed pugs.

Pug

The study population was 96 intact males, 106 neutered males, 63 intact females, and 118 spayed females for a total sample of 383 cases. In intact males and females, the occurrences of joint disorders were zero and 2 percent, respectively. In neutered males and females, there was no evident increased occurrence of joint disorders. The level of occurrence of one or more cancers in intact males was 6 percent and in intact females, 8 percent. Neutering males and females did not lead to any evident increase in risk of a cancer. There were no cases of MC in females left intact or spayed at any time, and there was a 5 percent occurrence of PYO in the intact females. None of the females was diagnosed with UI. Lacking a noticeable occurrence of increased joint disorders or cancers in neutered males or females, those wishing to neuter should decide on the appropriate age.

 

Edited by sandgrubber
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Different breed, so as in the study linked by @sandgrubber, different possible scenarios, but for what it's worth, my BC girl was desexed a couple of months ago at nearly 4 .. after 5 seasons.  The latest I've desexed a bitch, but she was showing, and I was persuaded by the more recent thinking about later desexing.- given that agility is in her future.  My reasons for desexing now .. combination of excess of caution . I'd been terrified of missing a closed pyometra if she stayed entire, and convenience in terms of entering tracking trials .. no entire bitches - and she would have been due in season right in tracking season.  

She bounced back from the desexing just fine.

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