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Moving to Aus - bring / leave dog behind?


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Hi all, 

 

New here, joined to ask advice for this question I have..

In Nz, and I plan to move over to live in Australia.

 

After divorce 3 years ago I share the care of my 13 year old lurcher (greyhound/wolfhound/collie cross) Mollie with my ex. 

 

She is the most intelligent and sensitive being I have ever known, she loves me deeply and we have been best friends for the 11 years we have been friends :)

 

Now my children are grown and left home, I really want to move and begin new life - but the thought of leaving mollie behind is almost too much to contemplate.

She would have the old family home and my ex who loves her ( but doesn't have anywhere near as much time to spend with her as i do)  so she wouldn't be left with some stranger. So she would be loved and ok. But I know she would miss me, we have a special connection, and I would miss her. She almost feels like my third daughter.

 

Now, she is probably too old and it would be unfair to bring her with me, she would also miss my ex and it would make it logistically much more difficult to set up a new life with her in Australia...

 

So I have this dilemma, if I stay here in Nz until she passes which could be another 5 years ? - or do I just do the most unthinkable and leave her, albeit it knowing she is safe, but knowing she would miss me as much as I miss her.. is that too uncompassionate on a  loving old dog who has given so much to me?

 

If things financially were different I would definitely stay, but the reality is in my small NZ town I am struggling and can be in a much healthier financial situation with a move over the pond.

 

Any ideas / advice /  criticisms / stupid jokes much appreciated : )

 

 

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In the late 1980s, I flew to NZ with two 5 year old dogs (BC and GSD). I returned 5 years later with both dogs. I didn’t expect or encounter any difficulties. 

 

The dogs were transported on the planes I traveled on, and I collected them after clearing quarantine and picking up my luggage.

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I doubt your dog will live for another 5 years. That would make her 18. With Grey and Wolf hound part of her make up then I think she has done very well to get to 13.

Dogs are very adjustable. Yes Mollie would miss you initially but will accept her new life. And be happy.

You will be the one that will pay a bigger price. Sounds like you don't have a choice to move. If that's what happens then so be it but for your mental health you will need to change your thinking that Mollie got the short straw not being able to move with you.

I also think Mollie is not too old to come across after you settle but that will cost big bucks and I assume you will be working full time so less time for Mollie. 

Mollie is very lucky to have 2 people who love her.

 

Edited by Rebanne
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27 minutes ago, Rebanne said:

Mollie is very lucky to have 2 people who love her.

This, of course, but also @Rikis very lucky to know that if he did leave Mollie, she is very loved.  

 

I don’t have any advice, really.  I just feel deeply for you in this dilemma.    

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Sorry, I just re-read your post and realised that the logistics of setting up in a new place with a dog may be a problem.

 

Would it possible to leave her with your ex when you move, then reassess once you have settled in?

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IMO she isn't too old to move.  I've moved my elderly puppy farm rescue who is older than Mollie, all over South Australia and as long as I'm with him (even though I work full-time), he's happy as larry.  If your ex is OK with it, I'd bring her with you. But make sure you have somewhere pet friendly to stay on arrival, a pet friendly rental or are in a position to buy a house with a fence to keep her safe.  Good luck! :)

Edited by westiemum
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Thanks all, 

 

Still thinking hard about it, I can't seem to imagine actually saying that last goodbye to her so maybe thats my answer ....

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2 hours ago, Rik said:

Thanks all, 

 

Still thinking hard about it, I can't seem to imagine actually saying that last goodbye to her so maybe thats my answer ....

 I know exactly what you mean - I can't ever imagine a time when I say goodbye to mine either so the choice becomes fairly simple - they come or I don't go. Good luck Rik, with whatever you decide.

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First off Mollie would have to pass the fight to fly aspect .

She will need to meet the export requirements .

This may not happen .

Then there is a risk with an elderly dog .

 

Export flying is not like a domestic flight or a drive in the car a few hrs down the road .

 

So I would contact agents in NZ to get a feel of what requirements are for very elderly dogs  that aren’t already listed on thee Aqus site.

 

Is she crate trained.?? 
Would she happily cope for maybe 6/7 hrs crated .

 

Edited by Dogsfevr
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  • 4 weeks later...

Well, we have the opposite situation: we might need to move to NZ and have not one, but three rescue dogs: 2 Kelpie x (nearly 15 and 13 year-old respectively), and a sound-phobic 7.5 year-old Border Collie. Not an easy fix. Apart from the horrific expense, and the risk that the BC will bark for the entire flight there (Sydney-Auckland) because of the engine noise, how/where do we find out if the dogs are fit to fly from this end? Not sure our countryside vets have much experience with this... 

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4 hours ago, poundhound said:

Well, we have the opposite situation: we might need to move to NZ and have not one, but three rescue dogs: 2 Kelpie x (nearly 15 and 13 year-old respectively), and a sound-phobic 7.5 year-old Border Collie. Not an easy fix. Apart from the horrific expense, and the risk that the BC will bark for the entire flight there (Sydney-Auckland) because of the engine noise, how/where do we find out if the dogs are fit to fly from this end? Not sure our countryside vets have much experience with this... 

The dogs need to go to the vet irrespective for there departure requirements to enter NZ.The travel agent you use will assist you with an export vet where it will also be discussed the risk off flying the oldies and management off the dogs and getting th3m use to a crate ASAP 

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I’d be desensitising and counter conditioning to all aspects individually and then putting what you can together. Sound proof puppy training app has take off/landing and in cabin sounds which you can work up to being on proper speakers. Combine with adpatil if it helps, and discuss anti-anxiety medication (NOT acepromazine, and note that anxiety meds aren’t necessarily sedatives) or at least zylkene supplementation with a vet experienced in treating anxiety (most aren’t). Start now and ideally get help - it is very easy to inadvertently sensitise instead of desensitise a dog. Pet Professional Guild Australia is a good place to look for a trainer, ANZCVS vet behaviour chapter website for a vet behaviourist/behaviour vet - many do zoom consults. And a full vet check. A huge number of noise phobic dogs have chronic pain of some sort. Hope this helps and apologies if you already have this stuff covered.

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8 hours ago, Papillon Kisses said:

I’d be desensitising and counter conditioning to all aspects individually and then putting what you can together. Sound proof puppy training app has take off/landing and in cabin sounds which you can work up to being on proper speakers. Combine with adpatil if it helps, and discuss anti-anxiety medication (NOT acepromazine, and note that anxiety meds aren’t necessarily sedatives) or at least zylkene supplementation with a vet experienced in treating anxiety (most aren’t). Start now and ideally get help - it is very easy to inadvertently sensitise instead of desensitise a dog. Pet Professional Guild Australia is a good place to look for a trainer, ANZCVS vet behaviour chapter website for a vet behaviourist/behaviour vet - many do zoom consults. And a full vet check. A huge number of noise phobic dogs have chronic pain of some sort. Hope this helps and apologies if you already have this stuff covered.

 

Thanks, it helps. We've been working with our BC on his noise phobia, and have manage to reduce the long list of scary sounds he came with when we adopted him from the pound, but there are still some sounds that we can't seem to neutralise: thunder (of course), motorcycles, chainsaws, and whippersnippers. He's been on fluoxetine for at least four years, and it has helped tremendously. None of the other remedies seemed to make a difference. Two of the dogs are somewhat crate-trained. The third is a recent adoption, but generally speaking she is a much calmer dog. Thanks again for any replayed advice.

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