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Disturbing dog park incident.


Ray27
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  Yet another very preventable incident happened at a local dog park today. During the pandemic my partner has been picking me up from work each day & regularly parks across the road at a small park. Not deignated as a " dog park" as such and sururrounded on three sides by high rise flats and on one side by a road, the park is a relativly small square of grass with some small mounds and rose bushes at one end  & a few park benches surrounding the level grassed area at the other. The park seems to be frequented by a steadily growing number of what appears to be first time dog owners who all seem to have relatively new  puppies from around the 3 mth & upwards age range. There are a gang of the oodle doodles, a dachund, who holds it's own with all of them & does the occasional "woof" & jumps up on the park bench when things get too much; a grey & white Am Staffy that is gangly & goofy & the little ones lick at its face trying to play; a few Frenchies of various sizes that gallop about, & a giant young Rotweiler that is suprisingly good tempered when all the little moodles & similar combinations try & tackle it. It simply does gentle play bows & runs about with them patiently. The various owners stand around smiling, sometimes offering treats

(seemingly for just existing), but there is no training, no recalls &, it seems, it is rarely time to leave- even when their dogs are obviously trying to get away from some of the more rambunctious larger & older dogs by looking at them pleadingly for assistance or hiding between their owners legs.

 The number of owners and dogs keeps seeming to grow in size, and although at first glance the park appears to offer some kind of "puppy heaven" with lots of playing and gentle "bitey face " and "zoomies", after watching a little more closely recently I noticed that things were getting more & more out of control. One miniture poodle had to be removed after repeatly trying to hump one of the smaller dogs like there was "no tomorrow", one young shepard had to be placed back on the lead when it began a game of chase that was becoming predatory towards an older pomeranian, & some of the younger puppies were obviously becoming nervous & not wanting to play at all. I recently commented that although things looked "cute" from a distance, things were potentially about to go horribly wrong.

  Unfortunately today was that day. On leaving work I noticed that said partner was standing in front of the car &, as this was unusual, I asked what was up. She outlined a quite horrific incident that had unfolded in front of her & actually caused her to jump out of the car & run full pelt towards the hapless dog owners to try & save one of their own dogs. Today apparently all the dogs and owners were there at the same time, so  the park was a muddle of different sized dogs. A terrible screaming of a dog in pain had rung out- a half grown shei pei was standing & literally screaming in terror & on the side of it's face a larger bull arab type breed had totally latched on! Nervous dog owners stood around & at the same moment the young shepard, unnoticed in the shananigans, had lunged towards one of the smaller dogs & was about to grab it over the back. Ploughing towards the shei pei & bull arab, whose owner seemed to be gently trying to call it off with a repeated  "release" command & some other gentle but unheard words that the bull arab was obviously not familiar with, partner had yelled at the shepards owner to "put it on a lead!" & then tersley told the owner of the  bull arab to "shove your finger up it's arse!" Bull arab owner keep trying to pull the dog off instead but after another person known to the dog owner yelled out the same thing, he did just that & his dog immediately released. It was still an effort to drag his dog away & by this point he was bleeding- him not his dog. The Shei pei's owner organised their partner to call the vet & my partner had to offer a clean tissue to allow the bull arab's owner to apply pressure to his  (thankfully minor wound) to his arm. All he could repeat was that "it was ok as his dog did not have anything!" (As if a doogie form of HIV was the shei pei owners biggest concern!) Hopefully he has  had a tenus shot. After this my now shaken partner had actually stood & announced to the dog owners that she had noticed "alot of roughhousing" happening lately and these dogs needed to be on the lead.  Very brave of her I thought given what had gone down, but a no-win situation for everyone least of all the poor dogs.

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Definitely sounds like a disaster waiting to happen. If it was me and my dog, we’d be nowhere near there. Foolish bunch of dog owners in my opinion. 

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 Yes defiantely foolish. (Sorry for rediculously long post & spelling errors in previous post). Owners are all very young & I am suspecting "lockdown" puppies  have been purchased with many completely unaware of the potential size & strength of their chosen breeds & the need for proper training & adequate socialisation - and not in the crazy overcrowded tiny park.  Poor bull arab's owner seemed surprised by his dogs behaviour (although not making any excuses for him)- but I think it's a case of not having done any homework before purchasing the wrong breed as a first time dog owner.

 

 

 

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Most dog owners in my suburb think the dogs will train themselves.  They are blissfully (on purpose) unaware that their dogs have to be leashed on public streets etc.  

 

They are also unaware (and don't care) that dogs have to be under effective control in an off leash park.  Truly there are a lot of idiots with dogs these days.  I'm sure most of them don't know what recall means.

 

We have a "professional" dog walker around our way.  He walks the dogs down to the park with no leashes in sight.  Proceeds to the park across busy roads (no leash) lets them run wild in the park whilst he plays with his phone.  Needless to say he doesn't pick up their poo either.

 

Yesterday he was on the phone in the street and away form the dogs.  His dog started rounding up and nipping the heels of another dog in the park.  His dog chased the young dog up to a busy road.  No intervention from the dog walker.  No apology either.

 

This is just one of the type of incidents that happen most days in our dog park.  Most of the time I keep my dog on a leash and keep walking.  It's all too precarious in dog parks these days .

 

 

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 Thanks for the feedback everyone. Partner was relaying incident to a dear friend & owner of a little powder puff Chinese crested & she also suggested reporting it so we are taking this advice on board.  Friend has also related her anxiety when unleashed dogs rush & lunge towards her dog whilst out walking, often across roads, & she has no idea what they will do, so is forced to change her direction-even though her dog is a trusting & friendly little dog. We do not even have a dog at the moment- but as dog lovers and animal lovers this ( the dog park) situation seemed intolerable, so we will be going ahead & phoning council.   Park was still in action today, but with a vastly decreased number of dogs, & not those involved in the dog fight, so for now at least some have obviously finally realised the dangers & voted with their feet.

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Good on you for caring and trying to change the situation.  The dog walker in our park thinks it's a natural thing for his dog to round up and nip the heels of other dogs "because he's a Border Collie and that's what they do".

 

The council that governs our area is absolutely hopeless.  So no one bothers.  There are many worse attack situations in our area and the outcome for people who have had their dogs attacked is not good.  Some attacks have taken up to a year to be investigated with no outcome for the people pursuing the attacking dogs.  Several residents have resorted to taking their own legal action because the council is so useless and won't make the proper legislative decisions.

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 It defiantely was terrible- according to partner people were screaming - in addition to the poor Shar Pei, & although owners were trying to separate their dogs, this was just strengthening the grip.  I did get the story slightly wrong, it was allegedly another passer by who assisted with the "finger up the dogs butt" routine, not the owner, as he was just trying to talk his dog around- to no avail. Obviously am not advocating this technique- person could have been bitten by said dogs. My partner was worried whether this had been the best course of action & looked up advice on the internet about separating "locked on" dogs when we got home, but most were advocating a whole range of dangerous things like wedging a stick in the aggressing dogs jaws or picking it up by the back legs & flipping it over-which in this circumstance would have potentially taken the other dogs face with it! Obviously the best course of action is simply not let things get to this in the first place!    Dogs can be just wonderful for peoples mental health & particularly through periods of stress like lockdown, but we all need to take some responsibility for our dogs. Perhaps parks should have signs with QR codes with links to reputable training organisations - for the owners not just the dogs!

Edited by Ray27
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DOG PARKS have been a disaster waiting for the next attack for decades.

 

Always have been and always will be.

 

they have pecking orders so every time strangers meet its a risk one or both will decide to attack instead of play.

 

I get so tired of hearing only people are nasty, only people are cruel.

 

the speakers have never had to get two dogs fighting apart.

 

have never seen a dog grab another and shake it like a rat, let alone in unsupervised situation every other dog can and will join in tearing the target apart if no one stops them.

 

dogs have no concept of cruelty, no concept that to kill is a crime if they decide to do so.

 

the level of lack of knowledge of dog behaviour across the board is frankly very unfortunate.

 

not only for the mental damage to anyone in such a situation when it unfolds, but the target dog being attacked

 

 

 

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This in one of the reasons why I don’t use dog parks.. it’s a disaster waiting to happen.

In the past I did go to dog parks but I got sick and tired of clueless dog owners being oblivious to their dog and their behaviour. No one will ever convince me to ever use one.

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I rarely take my dogs to parks now. I used to go every day to the large park near me. Back then I knew most of the dogs and people.  There was a regular group who all walked together but now there is so many people with no clue about dogs, and dogs they haven’t trained.  I’d be terrified one would kill my Italian greyhounds who wouldn’t have a chance.  It’s too risky.  I’d love to regularly take Soda there. He’s been twice and I didn’t see a single familiar face.  Maybe it will be better now lockdown is over. Perhaps people will go back to work and I can find a quiet time to take him. 

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Several months ago I was walking my dog in the park when I ran into a man walking 2 pit bulls.  He said they were both rescue dogs.  The female dog was well controlled and placid but the male was really aggressive and pulling at the lead and growling at my dog.  Needless to say I didn't hang around & took off very quickly.

 

I did say to the man with the dogs "you know if your male dog got loose to attack another dog the female dog would probably join in the attack as well.  And if that happenend it would be unlikely the dog would survive being attacked ." 

 

And that could apply to any pair of dogs where one is aggressive and the other goes in to attack as well.  Not just pit bulls.

 

I didn't think these 2 dogs should be walked together in an off leash park with children around.  He wasn't a huge guy and wasn't very confident he could restrain the male dog which he said was his girlfriends dog. I haven't been back to that park since.  The incident made me very nervous.

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  • 1 month later...

had a phone call from a friend whose puppy has been recently attacked in the street while out for a walk.   Her puppy is so traumatised now she is refusing to leave the house.  So distressed when she tried to carry her out the door she snarled at her and snapped her her to let her go then fled back into the house.

 

she has no idea who the person was whose dog attacked hers, soon as they caught it they took off.   (probably to avoid any vet bills I suspect or being reported to council)

 

She is hoping I have a solution.  Sadly apart from going to therapists for advice im out of my depth on this.

 

I do walk my dogs but I avoid any loose dogs like the plague for the same reason everyone else does.   If do spot one i head the other way and tend to grab the biggest stick I can find for defence if its needed to keep it well back before any thing can happen. So far telling the other dog "go Home " seems to confuse them enough to get away and many do exactly that, take off for home, its one sentence many dogs seem to have heard often

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My local park which I have been using for over 30 years has now acquired a group of 10 or more dog owners who meet in one area of the park at the same time every day.  The dogs are left to their own devices while the owners stand and talk etc.

 

The other day another resident walking on the path with his leashed dog was told by one of the group" you shouldn't walk your dog here because our dogs think they own this part of the park". 

 

Their dogs can do anything to other dogs i.e. rush up to them whilst leashed etc but the minute the other dog reacts to being rushed at or approached that dog is turned into the "problem".

 

Obviously I avoid the park at that time of day as do many other residents.  Unfortunately it has changed the atmosphere in the park with other residents becoming resentful that they can't use the park whenever they want in order to avoid this unpleasantness.

 

The dogs are out of control and the owners nasty and confrontational.  Does any one else experience this type of behaviour . in their local parks.

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