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latest on dingo origins


sandgrubber
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That's interesting, thanks for posting!

 

What I also find interesting is this quote:

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One major difference is that domestic dogs have evolved multiple copies of a gene called AMY2B that allows digestion of starchy foods. This is probably because they began eating rice after humans domesticated the crop around 10,000 years ago. Dingoes, in contrast, have a low-starch diet that mainly comprises marsupials and reptiles, and only have a single copy of this gene, similar to wolves and some Arctic dog breeds.

This should help put to bed the argument which has caused a huge divide in the dog world regarding feeding grains to dogs. The modern dog's diet should not be based on the diets of wolves or Dingoes. 

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When I fostered wild born dingo orphans, it was abundantly clear that they are NOT like domestic dogs in any way, shape, or form. If fed a standard "complete and balanced" dog food, they developed squirty bums really quickly, and just didn't thrive like they should... the best option was a diet high in lean raw meats. Turkey necks, kangaroo of just about any cut, etc, worked best for fit, healthy, and active growing pups I found...

 

Behaviourally, they were very different too... VERY smart (and cunning), very dextrous, and very inquisitive. They liked to "taste" everything new much more than domestic dogs too, including fingers and toes... lol! Somewhat more aloof and independent than domestic dogs also... they will do your bidding when and if it suits them only... *grin*

 

With the crossbred dingo/dog pups, it was a lottery as to whether they inherited more traits from one side or the other...

 

T.

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8 hours ago, ~Anne~ said:

That's interesting, thanks for posting!

 

What I also find interesting is this quote:

This should help put to bed the argument which has caused a huge divide in the dog world regarding feeding grains to dogs. The modern dog's diet should not be based on the diets of wolves or Dingoes. 

A more comprehensive literature search would have informed these researchers that this has been known since 2014. 
 

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24975239/

There is a big difference in amylase levels between dogs that have evolved in agrarian societies and those that evolved elsewhere. Unsurprisingly, as an ancient breed that evolved in the Fertile Crescent, the Saluki’s amalyse levels are the highest measured.  Basenjis and Sibes are among the lowest.    

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15 hours ago, ~Anne~ said:

That's interesting, thanks for posting!

 

What I also find interesting is this quote:

This should help put to bed the argument which has caused a huge divide in the dog world regarding feeding grains to dogs. The modern dog's diet should not be based on the diets of wolves or Dingoes. 

I'm sure the argument will continue.   The most energetic debaters don't give a hoot about science (on many other topics as well).

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3 hours ago, sandgrubber said:

I'm sure the argument will continue.   The most energetic debaters don't give a hoot about science (on many other topics as well).

Amen to that! :laugh:

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  • 1 month later...

Can't even see why they bother doing studies  on it .  Its not rocket science  ,, on the left you have  wild dogs ,, wolfs , foxes , dingos ,, these dogs have not yet worked out how to   grow grain , they don't know how to build or work machinery , plant corn or wheat , so they chase other animals and reptiles for there sunday dinner .

 

Domesticated dogs on the other hand  have come to rely on humans for food and humans themselves gave up hunting there food  a couple  of years ago so just go down the shop and buy it  in the process they buy there dog food , hence dogs  eating habits and digestive systems have evolved  diferently ,

 

So there you have it lesson free , next one only half the charge of an expensive study , save money make me rich win win  situation

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On 08/06/2022 at 9:38 AM, coneye said:

Can't even see why they bother doing studies  on it .  Its not rocket science  ,, on the left you have  wild dogs ,, wolfs , foxes , dingos ,, these dogs have not yet worked out how to   grow grain , they don't know how to build or work machinery , plant corn or wheat , so they chase other animals and reptiles for there sunday dinner .

 

Domesticated dogs on the other hand  have come to rely on humans for food and humans themselves gave up hunting there food  a couple  of years ago so just go down the shop and buy it  in the process they buy there dog food , hence dogs  eating habits and digestive systems have evolved  diferently ,

 

So there you have it lesson free , next one only half the charge of an expensive study , save money make me rich win win  situation

yes but that doesn't get a study grant 

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On 08/06/2022 at 9:38 AM, coneye said:

Can't even see why they bother doing studies  on it .  Its not rocket science  ,, on the left you have  wild dogs ,, wolfs , foxes , dingos ,, these dogs have not yet worked out how to   grow grain , they don't know how to build or work machinery , plant corn or wheat , so they chase other animals and reptiles for there sunday dinner .

 

Domesticated dogs on the other hand  have come to rely on humans for food and humans themselves gave up hunting there food  a couple  of years ago so just go down the shop and buy it  in the process they buy there dog food , hence dogs  eating habits and digestive systems have evolved  diferently ,

 

So there you have it lesson free , next one only half the charge of an expensive study , save money make me rich win win  situation

 

Well, yes, but on the other hand, with science, it is important to test assumptions. Sometimes things that seem obvious don't actually end up being true.

 

Also, if you know exactly what the genetic differences are between dogs and dingoes, that will help us in preserving real dingoes, rather than wild dog crosses.

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5 hours ago, Selkie said:

 

Well, yes, but on the other hand, with science, it is important to test assumptions. Sometimes things that seem obvious don't actually end up being true.

 

Also, if you know exactly what the genetic differences are between dogs and dingoes, that will help us in preserving real dingoes, rather than wild dog crosses.

 also to rebuff the argument that dingoes are just wild dogs so there's no point to preserving them.  

 

Genetic research isn't that expensive these days and can have side benefits, for example by building up the knowledge base for understanding hereditary conditions/diseases.

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