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I own a corgi. As per normal walking behavior I know that he should be walking for more than 30 minutes. But, whenever I take him out for a walk then in max 30 mins his pads start bleeding. I took him to my vet and he recommended me to make him wear shoes or boots. Now it has been more than 2 months but he still refuses to wear them, I make him wear it and he just removes it from his paws and throws them away. Does anyone have any better option?

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What surfaces are you walking him on and how fast and how often are you walking him? 
 

It could be surface related or speed.
 

Can you change this in someway, and reduce the length of the walks?

 

The idea would be to build up the skin thickness slowly. His pads may be super soft if he spends most of his time on carpet, for example, and then once a week has to walk on a hard concrete surface at a fast pace for the walk.
 

Alternatively, you could train him to keep the shoes on. Put them on at home - distract him from them - reward him when he leaves them alone.  

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Who said he had to walk more then 30 minutes? As the others above but just walk him for 15 mins and never hot ground ( I see you are overseas and it's summer there )

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11 hours ago, ~Anne~ said:

What surfaces are you walking him on and how fast and how often are you walking him? 
 

It could be surface related or speed.
 

Can you change this in someway, and reduce the length of the walks?

 

The idea would be to build up the skin thickness slowly. His pads may be super soft if he spends most of his time on carpet, for example, and then once a week has to walk on a hard concrete surface at a fast pace for the walk.
 

Alternatively, you could train him to keep the shoes on. Put them on at home - distract him from them - reward him when he leaves them alone.  

Training is all I am doing for the past 2 months. Let's see how much more time it will take. I think he is having trouble wearing the shoes. Shoes are definitely not made for him. The surface he is walking on is very plain and the speed is very normal. I have reduced the length of the walks, but I still think that shoes will be best for precaution. I came across this article the other day: https://doggyshoe.com/dog-non-slip-paw-traction-grip-pads/, do you think it is a nice idea to introduce paw pads to him. They are saying that pads will be less irritating and dog's love them.

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10 hours ago, persephone said:

How old is your dog ? How long have you had him, and where did he come from ? (breeder, pet shop, rescue, etc ) 

He is 10 years old. I had him since the past 6 years. I got him from a breeder.

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9 hours ago, Rebanne said:

Who said he had to walk more then 30 minutes? As the others above but just walk him for 15 mins and never hot ground ( I see you are overseas and it's summer there )

Because of the hot grounds only I was looking for shoes, but he is refusing to wear them.

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Three things come to my mind.

 

1.  Who ruled 30 minutes?  :) :).  I see you have reduced the length of walks, because that was going to be my first suggestion.  Dogs are individuals and a 30 minutes walk might be just right for one, too long for another and not nearly enough for another.   Do you allow your dog to walk at his own pace?  Do you let him stop and sniff, look around, enjoy himself? The walk is supposed to be for him and his needs.  I live on a street that is in a very popular walking area; so many people seem to think a walk is one where the ambition is to get from A to B in the shortest time possible.  Poor dogs.  
 

2.  Your comment, “Shoes are definitely not made for him,” made me laugh. Reminded me of the person who took her new puppy out for his first walk.  She said that he didn’t like the lead and wouldn’t walk and never took him out again.  :banghead:  :banghead:   What dog is born knowing what a lead and collar are?  And in your case: what dog thinks that wearing shoes is a good idea?  LOL.  
 

3.  I don’t like the idea of those stick on pads, particularly when your dog seems to have very sensitive feet anyway.  But this is the first time I have heard of them so my opinion is based solely on looking on your link.   But if rubbing alcohol needs to be used to remove any adhesive, I would be giving them a big miss.  
 

I think you need to find a nice, soft, grassy surface for your dog to walk on.  
 

Good luck.  

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1 hour ago, Loving my Oldies said:

I think you need to find a nice, soft, grassy surface for your dog to walk on.  

and walk him EARLY in the morning before the sun heats up the footpath!! 

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1 hour ago, Mike Jade said:

Because of the hot grounds

please walk him EARLY , not long after sunrise  before the sun has time to heat up the ground!! That's the sensible thing to do. :) It sounds as though your poor dog is getting burnt and sore feet ..... :(

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1 hour ago, Loving my Oldies said:

Three things come to my mind.

 

1.  Who ruled 30 minutes?  :) :).  I see you have reduced the length of walks, because that was going to be my first suggestion.  Dogs are individuals and a 30 minutes walk might be just right for one, too long for another and not nearly enough for another.   Do you allow your dog to walk at his own pace?  Do you let him stop and sniff, look around, enjoy himself? The walk is supposed to be for him and his needs.  I live on a street that is in a very popular walking area; so many people seem to think a walk is one where the ambition is to get from A to B in the shortest time possible.  Poor dogs.  
 

2.  Your comment, “Shoes are definitely not made for him,” made me laugh. Reminded me of the person who took her new puppy out for his first walk.  She said that he didn’t like the lead and wouldn’t walk and never took him out again.  :banghead:  :banghead:   What dog is born knowing what a lead and collar are?  And in your case: what dog thinks that wearing shoes is a good idea?  LOL.  
 

3.  I don’t like the idea of those stick on pads, particularly when your dog seems to have very sensitive feet anyway.  But this is the first time I have heard of them so my opinion is based solely on looking on your link.   But if rubbing alcohol needs to be used to remove any adhesive, I would be giving them a big miss.  
 

I think you need to find a nice, soft, grassy surface for your dog to walk on.  
 

Good luck.  

Totally understood. Will surely start making him walk in the park or grassy surface. For paw pads they are saying that we don't need to do anything. They will come off the paw themselves after a few days. But still it is a glue substance that is why I was scared of using it. Will continue with the training only and one day will make him wear those shoes comfortably.

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9 minutes ago, persephone said:

please walk him EARLY , not long after sunrise  before the sun has time to heat up the ground!! That's the sensible thing to do. :) It sounds as though your poor dog is getting burnt and sore feet ..... :(

Will start doing that first thing tomorrow

 

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One in centigrade and one in Farenheight  so pick one that you are familiar with

The 5 Second Rule: Put the back of your hand on the pavement, if you cannot hold it there for 5 seconds it is too hot to walk. If the asphalt is so hot you could probably fry an egg on it, then it can burn your dog's feet.

 

2015-hot-asphalt-awareness.thumb.jpg.d4d86d4ed955efaad6173f12418d2cc4.jpg        Blog_Hot_Pavement_Temperatures.thumb.jpg.1e0a2d6f7f84e39e039e6e3733bda4a2.jpg

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If it is burning his of his paws, you'll start to see improvement by v early or late shorter walks.
 

If his feet have been normal for the past 6yrs and you see no improvement by implementing timing changes I'd then get him checked for a secondary fungal or bacterial infection of the pads let in through the open skin. Booties are ok but not if there's underlying infection or injuries. They would feel painful to wear. 

 

Tested those sticky paw things once :laugh: save your money. 

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