Jump to content

why early desexing is not that good for them


 Share

Recommended Posts

same applies to puppies of both sexes

 

 

"

How long after banding is a goat fertile?
 
 
It's best to wait as long as possible to band the baby bucklings so that their urethra grows to size (so that they won't have difficulties with urinary calculi (urinary stones)), but they may become fertile at about eight weeks so most folks don't wait much longer than that."
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Australian and NSW welfare standards advocate that band castration can be done without pain relief up to 8 weeks for goats, 12 weeks for sheep, and 2 weeks for calves. However, it can be done a bit later, up to 6 months or so if pain relief is used - without the need for a vet to do it.

 

I used to wait as long as possible (usually around 8 weeks) for our boy kids at work... but I always used Buccalgesic (oral gel) for pain relief regardless. We found that the occurrence of urinary calculi was virtually non-existent if we waited that long to do it. It is important to note that diet also plays a big role in the formation of calculi in goats and sheep... pellet feeds can be a bit off in the calcium/phosphorous ratio - especially for goats - and should be fed sparingly if not at all. We used lucerne chaff (daily allocation) and meadow/rye hay (ad-lib) to good effect in that regard, and the placement of plenty of salt licks to encourage drinking (and urinating) as well.

 

Also of note, male kids start to get a scent after 8 weeks of age, so castrating them by 8 weeks tends to negate that male goat stink from happening. The later you do them, the more they will have that odour about them.

 

T.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 24/07/2022 at 11:44 AM, asal said:

same applies to puppies of both sexes

The dog situation turns out to be complicated.   Varies by breed.  Also what's good for cancer risk may be bad for skeletal stuff.  Here's a major data crunching study that provides information for 35 breeds

 

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fvets.2020.00388/full

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...