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JRG

Breeders / Community
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About JRG

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    Forum Regular

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  • Gender
    Female

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  • Location
    VIC
  1. Drink Bowl

    Don’t know anything about the one you mention, I use a Road Refresher which does not spill and is difficult to play with the water.
  2. adaptil spray for nervous dog

    The vet said I can give him three x 450mg if I foresee a problem day (ie lots of male visitors!) but I have never given him more than 2. I have to admit that Ted is much improved, but it has taken us 4+ months to get this far. Don’t expect too much too soon.
  3. adaptil spray for nervous dog

    I used adaptil 24/7 + zylene (up to two 450mg capsules per day) for a 20kg boy. have decreased as he has become more confident and dropped the adaptil altogether.
  4. adaptil spray for nervous dog

    I have not tried deconstructing the capsules, Ted will eat them buried in cream cheese! Fortunately he LOVES cheese and will now take it from my hand.
  5. adaptil spray for nervous dog

    I did not see anything dramatic, just a gradual calming down and a reduced reaction to the world at large. He can still be “spooky”, but comes round quicker and does not hide in his crate all the time.
  6. adaptil spray for nervous dog

    Try budgetpetproducts.com.au. I have found it cheaper from them than anyone else
  7. adaptil spray for nervous dog

    Zylkene has been a godsend for my very nervous “rescue” spaniel. You can buy it on line or at some pet suppliers. No prescription needed. My vet behaviourist says my boy can have two or three times the dose on the packet if needed.
  8. When I look at your responses to the various breeds, I have to confess that you do not really want a Gundog at all particularly not one of the working types.I agree with dogsfevr, get a dog that the family want, and take it with you on your hunting trips. As long as it bashes the cover a bit and stays with you , it will be a good companion
  9. Kippers

    Like Tassiee, I would start with a big soft toy not a ball. Start in the house, in the passage. All doors shut so he cannot escape.. sit on the floor and get the pup interested in the toy, then throw a short distanc (1 meter ) and en courage the pup to go after it and as soon as he goes to pick it up, call him back in an excited voice and welcome him with enthusiasm. Do not immediately take the prize (toy). Play with the pup and toy for a while and only then,ask him to give it to you . Start all over again.
  10. Just watch that you don’t create jealousy between the dogs. I would never play with one of the girls unless the other one is confined.
  11. Phantom dog pregnancies

    Yes.don’t bother with an ultrasound. At this late stage and possibly a small litter, X-ray is more accurate.
  12. Licking stitches

    This can work well - just fasten along the dog's back not under her tummy. (Boots (in the pic) had stitches on his chest between his front legs)
  13. Accidentally express bladder?

    The answer is “yes”. When looking after orphan baby pups you have to rub their tummy’s in order to toilet them. So just watch out, you might get poops as well! Their mum licks them for the same purpose.
  14. Agree! try not to be too predictable. Keep him guessing! You do not want him to think that he will get fed every time you put him into his crate. Maybe feed him at different times of the day if that is possible or let different people feed him sometimes. Anything (within reason and safety) to stop his wild anticipation of food!
  15. Getting a new puppy

    Don’t know much about the history of the breed,but they are more related to setters than spaniels. Their style of movement / working is different - they run and air scent then point their game from a distance,, whereas the spaniels sort of bustle, stay close to their handler, ground scent and flush./ startle their game immediately they find it. Horses for courses. I suspect their temperament is different too. - a dog that is bred to stay close to it’s handler would tend to view life differently to one bred to be more independent .
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