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Gsp

Tooth extraction

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Gsp   

My puppy vet check has noticed a problem with her front incisors and the vet wants to extract it. It’s quite an op! Is it necessary? I think her jaw is slightly out of alignment and the vet thinks removing it will help the adult tooth come in more aligned. Any feedback will be appreciated. Her are photos of her little teeth. F4FDDEE7-91DB-4922-B6B5-15D8DFC8A1FA.thumb.jpeg.693a9d7df54f25556f986b16d8c551df.jpeg

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I would do it to prevent further dental problems.

 

You could always ask to see a vet with further training and qualifications in dentistry. In NSW there is Dr Christine Hawke at Animal Referral Hospital Homebush. 

 

PS it is common for puppies to have teeth extracted that are coming in incorrectly or which have been retained. 

Edited by Papillon Kisses
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karen15   

Not a dog dentist, but looks similar to when my Westie got his canines. You can see here he had two upper incisors for a bit. The adult tooth came through in front of the baby tooth. Now has a perfect set of chompers. 

doubletooth.jpg

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Gsp   

Thankyou for the feedback. I’m going to get a second opinion before I make a decision. It’s quite unsettling for me. I’m a sook!  I just want to do the right thing by her. 

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Rappie   

From the photos you have posted, it does look like there is entrapment of the lower canine. If this is the case, then yes extraction of the tooth is recommended. If the tip of the tooth is indenting the hard palate, then it can / will restrict the growth of the mandible and, as you have noted there is already some malocclusion occurring. Extraction of the offending tooth remove the restriction and allows normal growth and development. There can also often be significant trauma to the hard palate from the tooth which can lead to pain and infection.

The photo that karen15 has posted represented a persistent deciduous maxillary canine - which is a different scenario. Extraction for these is still recommended but for different reasons. 

Edited by Rappie
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