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sharon1961

Veterinary records/notes retention

23 posts in this topic

I'm so sorry to hear this - and the terrible loss of your cav - such lovely pups.

 

And while dogs certainly do die from HGE, as long as you treat it early and aggressively you're in with a good chance.  I had a westie, Sarah who had two bouts of HGE around the age of 6.  We almost lost her the first time, but a drip, ABs from memory and overnight care and she came home fully fit two or three nights later after barking the vet down.  The second time I recognised it earlier, scooped her up and ran for the vet after calling ahead.  They grabbed her on arrival and raced her out the back and onto a drip and other assessment and treatment I've forgotten.   Sarah always had a 'sensitive' 'dicky' tummy, and I often wondered if it was the aftermath of her HGE.  

 

I have to say your story sounds like your dog did not get the care you could reasonably expect and the vet(s) that night were distracted by the other dog.   Look, while it happens and vets are human and HGE is easy to miss, (particularly in its early stages), the treatment for HGE is not hard and basic support treatment should have been provided (drip, ABs).  I also ask where were the vet nurses who should have noticed that your dog was rapidly going downhill and advocated on your behalf with the vet?  

 

Glad you've done the vet board complaint.  While it won't bring your dog back, it may help avoid this happening again and make the practice look at improving their processes. 

 

My sincere condolences again and a little gentle advice from an almost 60 year old - always always question if you are not sure or are unhappy.  I've learned the very hard way to always question the medical advice I get from my GPs.  They are often wrong (scary I know) and I have learned in some cases to ignore their wrong advice. 

 

My vets are wonderful - they have learned that while I will question, I'm reasonable and they work with me in partnership but that I will not just take their advice just because they are the vet.  I will question and advocate for my dogs as I should given they can't do it themselves.  I hope there is never 'a next time' for you but should something like this happen again follow your gut.  If your dog is clearly deteriorating and no-one is helping you then scoop him/her up and head to the other emergency vet or nearest vet to get the dog stabilised at least.    While there is risk in that as well - at least you are you not sitting there watching your dog die. 

 

I hope you find some closure and some peace. 

 

ETA:  I think the Emergency Vets on Anzac Highway have had 'the word' from my regular vets not to treat me like a 'dummy', as earlier in the year, when my Mum's cat developed a very rare form a feline cancer,  and we were seeing some unfamiliar vets at the Emergency Practice, they even gave me copies of the very few studies available so I could read them, ask yet more questions and understand as much as possible the clinical decisions we were making.  (I think my reputation precedes me! LOL!).  Point of my story?  While they are the repositories of the specialist knowledge and skill (and I absolutely get and respect that), I too have skills and knowledge and I know my dog(s).  I am also their only advocate - and I take that role very seriously - and will walk out on a vet (or GP!) if I have to.  Some years ago there was  a silly young vet who I crossed swords with - she didn't last long and went to Melbourne!   

Edited by westiemum
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7 hours ago, westiemum said:

I'm so sorry to hear this - and the terrible loss of your cav - such lovely pups.

 

And while dogs certainly do die from HGE, as long as you treat it early and aggressively you're in with a good chance.  I had a westie, Sarah who had two bouts of HGE around the age of 6.  We almost lost her the first time, but a drip, ABs from memory and overnight care and she came home fully fit two or three nights later after barking the vet down.  The second time I recognised it earlier, scooped her up and ran for the vet after calling ahead.  They grabbed her on arrival and raced her out the back and onto a drip and other assessment and treatment I've forgotten.   Sarah always had a 'sensitive' 'dicky' tummy, and I often wondered if it was the aftermath of her HGE.  

 

I have to say your story sounds like your dog did not get the care you could reasonably expect and the vet(s) that night were distracted by the other dog.   Look, while it happens and vets are human and HGE is easy to miss, (particularly in its early stages), the treatment for HGE is not hard and basic support treatment should have been provided (drip, ABs).  I also ask where were the vet nurses who should have noticed that your dog was rapidly going downhill and advocated on your behalf with the vet?  

 

Glad you've done the vet board complaint.  While it won't bring your dog back, it may help avoid this happening again and make the practice look at improving their processes. 

 

My sincere condolences again and a little gentle advice from an almost 60 year old - always always question if you are not sure or are unhappy.  I've learned the very hard way to always question the medical advice I get from my GPs.  They are often wrong (scary I know) and I have learned in some cases to ignore their wrong advice. 

 

My vets are wonderful - they have learned that while I will question, I'm reasonable and they work with me in partnership but that I will not just take their advice just because they are the vet.  I will question and advocate for my dogs as I should given they can't do it themselves.  I hope there is never 'a next time' for you but should something like this happen again follow your gut.  If your dog is clearly deteriorating and no-one is helping you then scoop him/her up and head to the other emergency vet or nearest vet to get the dog stabilised at least.    While there is risk in that as well - at least you are you not sitting there watching your dog die. 

 

I hope you find some closure and some peace. 

 

ETA:  I think the Emergency Vets on Anzac Highway have had 'the word' from my regular vets not to treat me like a 'dummy', as earlier in the year, when my Mum's cat developed a very rare form a feline cancer,  and we were seeing some unfamiliar vets at the Emergency Practice, they even gave me copies of the very few studies available so I could read them, ask yet more questions and understand as much as possible the clinical decisions we were making.  (I think my reputation precedes me! LOL!).  Point of my story?  While they are the repositories of the specialist knowledge and skill (and I absolutely get and respect that), I too have skills and knowledge and I know my dog(s).  I am also their only advocate - and I take that role very seriously - and will walk out on a vet (or GP!) if I have to.  Some years ago there was  a silly young vet who I crossed swords with - she didn't last long and went to Melbourne!   

Thank you so much Westiemum for your very kind words and your valued advice, I so wish I could turn back time and trust my instinct.

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My pleasure sharon - its a bugger of a thing to happen.  Hindsight is a wonderful thing - and yes we've all had times we wish we'd done things differently - and I'll bet those vets are looking back on that evening wishing they could have their time again too. 

 

But thank you for sharing - its gives all of us an opportunity to discuss and walk around the issue from all points of view - and you never know - it might just help someone else and their dog - so your cavvies death won't be in vain.  :)

 

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