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sandgrubber

Age of spey/neuter : massive study

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https://www.researchgate.net/publication/334707275_Best_age_for_spay_and_neuter_a_new_paradigm

Abstract

For the past several decades the mantra for the age of spay/neuter of dogs not intended for breeding was around 6 months---maintained on the basis of pet population control, as well as beliefs in prevention of mammary and some other cancers and prevention of some behavior problems in males. This project, undertaken at our center with an extensive case record database, focused on examining the incidence of joint disorders, certain cancers (including mammary cancer), pyometra, and urinary incontinence associated with gonadectomy in various breeds and at different spay/neuter ages. The findings on 35 breeds reveal that in some breeds the occurrence of one or more joint disorders or cancers for dogs spayed or neutered at 6 months reaches as high as 3-4 times that of dogs left intact. In other breeds, including small-dog breeds, neither joint disorders nor cancers increase with spay or neuter at any age. In a few breeds, the “safe” age for spay/neuter to avoid an increase in joint disorders or cancers may be as late as 2 years. So far, we have published the findings on three breeds: the Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever and German Shepherd Dog. Some examples of breed-specific results will be presented at the conference; we anticipate that by then all results will be available in an open-access journal. We propose that the new paradigm for spay/neuter be to give a client evidence-based information and guidance on the best time to gonadectomize their particular dog to avoid increasing the likelihood of debilitating joint disorders or some cancers. Key Words: gonadectomy, neutering, spaying, joint disorders, cancers

Edited by sandgrubber
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ricey   

Hi sandgrubber,

I read (and re-read) the whole article referred to in your original post and I thank you for posting it. Although I am heavily involved in dog rescue, I have never been comfortable with the rescue mantra of "early spay and neuter is mandatory". One size does not fit all, and it would seem that there is good scientific evidence that early neutering can be harmful. While I agree that spay and neuter programmes do a lot to limit the exponential increase in unwanted dogs, I don't want the remaining dogs to suffer unnecessary repercussions from too early neutering. I expect that I will be flamed by my rescue colleagues for questioning mandatory early spay and neutering, but that's to be expected. I have wanted an intact male American Pitbull Terrier puppy for some time now (I have no intention or desire to breed from this puppy, just a desire to keep it intact for health reasons). The registered breeders of any breed can handle intact male and female dogs without (mostly anyway :laugh:) unwanted litters and I am sure that I can too.

Cheers, ricey

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wirevizs   

I have a 14 mo female Italian Pointer/Bracco Italiano and unfortunately (especially in the current situation) cannot find a vet practice in N.S.W. who can perform an ovarian sparing spey.

Each of my first 4 desexed dogs have suffered from one or more of the following - haemangiosarcoma, brain tumour (?increased incidence in speyed female Vizslas particularly), epilepsy, diabetes, and Addison's disease - so I am keen henceforth for my dogs to maintain the benefits of hormones!

 

 

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