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sandgrubber

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About sandgrubber

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Interests
    Labradors, dog behaviour, health, genetics

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  • Location
    Overseas
  1. If you get nowhere, there are a few working cockers breeders in NZ. More upland game hunting there.
  2. In the US you can buy the C3, C5, C7, etc. and DIY. When I left it was under $10/jab, and half that if you buy in bulk. The only problem with DIY is that you don't have certification as required for kennels, etc.
  3. No lockdown in NZ. Puppy prices are up, and mixes are often more expensive than purebreds. Trademe prices seldom exceed $4k (this seems to be the going price for a daschund). I've been following Springers.... usually $1500-$2000. Lab Springer crosses are a bit more expensive, as are pups near big cities. Huntaways and heading dogs and mixes thereof are still under $1k.
  4. Curious. Is the fear of GST levy another factor driving people away from pedigree breeding?
  5. I agree, in general. Harsh punishment to a baby puppy for wound up behavior is like giving a human baby a belting for messing its diaper.
  6. At 10 weeks, be very careful about freshness, especially with chicken. Healthy mature dogs can handle Salmonella. It can kill baby dogs. I've encountered chicken mince sold for dogs that smelled putrid.
  7. Thought : might be worth trying a whistle. I've been doing whistle based recall training with a Springer who does more alert barking than I'd like. She gets a treat when she comes. If she's barking when the whistle sounds, she immediately stops barking and comes.
  8. Can't you talk to a vet nurse?
  9. I don't know about mini poodles, but bitey Springer babies can often be convinced to cuddle and stop biting.
  10. I think once you have had several lipomas diagnosed, it's fairly safe to assume further lumps that look familiar are more of the same. Of course there's a risk, and a lot of dogs die of cancer. But I don't think many of the cancer deaths present like a lipoma. Based on experience with Labs, yes, some old dogs get lipoma like some teens get pimples.
  11. Probably not, unless you can restrict him to a tick free area. Given the big coat on a Newf, tick control will be a challenge. Diet has little effect on the blood suckers. Rural VA offers great tick habit. You're lucky not to have paralysis tick.
  12. Absurd. Too many hoops to jump through. Restricting entry is the last thing clubs should be doing when membership is in decline and unregistered pups are costing thousands.
  13. Sympathy. I'm not of the hugging persuasion and not about to gush. I've lost two dear dog friends to cancer this year (diagnosis complicated, never clear, but it was clear that the future was bleak and painful, even if I chose to spend big $ on further diagnosis). It's hard to decide, when they still wag and show pleasure, when to make the awful choice.
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