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Troy

Poodle (toy)

10 posts in this topic

Troy   

Toy Poodle

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=197 )

Group: Group 7 (Non Sporting)

General Appearance: The Standard of the Poodle (Toy) is the same as that of the Poodle (Standard) and Poodle (Miniature) except that the height at shoulder should be under 28 cm (11 ins).

Tail: Docked: Set on rather high, carried at slight angle away from the body, never curled or carried over back, thick at root.

Undocked: Thick at root, set on rather high, carried away from the body and as straight as possible.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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JAG   

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I have been breeding and exhibiting toy poodles since 1995 under the Zillara prefix which I took over from my mum who established the kennel back in 1960.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

From my understanding the breed was established in Germany where they were used as water retrieving dogs. They were then taken on by the French as lap dogs.

3. How common is it in Australia?

The breed is very common here in Australia. Even more so with the advent of the cross bred dogs that have been appearing over the past 7 or so years. Ther was also a big rush on red toy poodles around 5 years ago as they were the :have to have toy" comanding a rather high price for the time.

4. What is the average lifespan?

The average lifespan for a toy poodle is 12 years but I have heard of them living to around 17 years of age.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Generally they should be happy, friendly little fellows who love to please.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

A good walk around the block will keep a toy happy. They like to know what is going on around them and love to see the outside world. The also enjoy a game of fetch with the owners if a walk is not possible.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

That is difficult to say as I have had both new dog owners and previous poodle owners not cope with their new addition and vice versa. If the new dog owner is diligent, willing to put the time and effort into a toy poodle and listen to what the breeder has to say about their new charge then yes they will cope. If the new owner thinks they know all there is to know because they read it on the internet and in books then no they won't cope. Owning a toy poodle (or any other poodle) is a challenge. They make you think, they test you out and they will train you if you are not careful.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Yes if given the right environment and training. Poodles are a social dog but can cope very well by themselves if raised the correct way.

9. How much grooming is required?

LOTS!! They are not a dog you can just leave in the backyard and forget. They need to be shaved every 6 to 8 weeks to keep the face, feet, tail and tummy clean and short. They should be bathed and groomed regularly to keep the coat fresh and knot free. A poodle coat will matt if left wet as it shrinks back into itself. It is a coat that does not shed so needs to be brushed and scissored/clippered regularly. Most pet people opt for the lamb trim (a short coat left all over the body) which is easy to maintain for the busy family and looks smart and tidy.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Toy poodles are generally a busy dog when young. They love to play and will get into mischief with what ever they can find. I do not recommend a toy poodle for very young children as they can try to dominate the young child and elevate themselves up in the pack order. A lot of toys are quite fine in build and are not suitable for young children as the risk of injury is higher. Older toy poodles are perfect for elderly or infirmed people. They are loving lap dogs that like to sit on the lounge with their owners being petted. They will happily go for a short walk or a potter around the yard. They will alert the owner to stangers in the area and are great company.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

PRA (Progressive Retinal Atrophy) a blindness that can occur in the toy poodle. Many breeders DNA test for this disease. Slipping patellas and Legg Perthes although less common .

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Puppy buyers should feel comfortable with their chosen breeder. They should be asking a variety of questions no matter how silly they think they are and expect a range of questions in return. Breeders ned to be sure their puppy is going to the best home available as well. They should be asking about the DNA status fo the parents for PRA. If the reply is the puppy is pattern A or normal/clear by parentage then the buyer should ask to see certificates of the parents to verify this is the case. If both parents are pattern A by parenatge then ask to see the grandparents certificates. At least one of the parents should be a pattern A which means that the worst the puppy could be genetically is a carrier of the disease or pattern B. Breeders should not state that the puppy will never go blind as there are many forms of PRA and currently there is only one test for the most common form PRCD.

From the Optigen Web site

More than one form of PRA in Poodles:

The prcd gene is the cause of most but not all cases of PRA in Poodles. There appears to be at least two different genetic forms of PRA in Poodles, even though the clinical signs of PRA in all diseased dogs are very similar. One form cannot be distinguished from another form based on a clinical exam. This is significant – a dog that is Normal/Clear for prcd-PRA could still be at risk for having or carrying another form of PRA. More information can be found here Optigen

Buyers should ask about slipping patellas and if the parents have been screened for this. Has the puppy also been checked at the time of its first vaccinations?

Where has the puppy been raised? What type of environment has it grown up in todate? What is the temperament of the parents? What should they expect from their puppy? Explain to the breeder what they are looking for in a new puppy. Do they want to take it to obedience classes or agility. If they want a quiet pet or one that will be high energy. Has the puppy been socilised, vcaccinated, wormed and mirchipped?

Most breeders will not let you select your own puppy. This is not uncommon and if you are comfotable with your breeder should not be an issue as the breeder has spent many hours with the litter observing and getting toknow the new pups individually. When you specify what type of puppy you want your dog to grow into then the breeder should nbe able to select the right little pup for you. Often one of the parents (usually the stud dog) won't reside with the breeder so the chances of you meeting both parents are not possible. If you have done your homework, you have been honest with your breeder then your new puppy will be exactly what you are looking for. :eek:

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I would like to ask a question on behalf of a friend of mine.

She has been researching for a while now and her family have decided to get a toy poodle puppy. The first breeder she contacted had male and female pups for different prices. She is looking for a dog that will be purely a pet - not for showing or breeding. Does anyone know if different pricing is normal? It seemed a bit odd but it may well be quite common.

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Darkrai   

Thats quite common for people to sell at different prices.

Im not sure where about most Toy breeders are in Vic, but click on the link abovein the first post or even search the breeders pages as some puppie aren't listed.

Good luck to them :thumbsup:

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Hello,

I’m researching a few breeds at the moment as i have just moved home and have left the beloved family dog on the farm as i felt that this was best for her. In the past we have owned a GSD a foxie an Anatolian Sheppard and a kelpie.

At the top of my list is the miniature poodle. If someone could answer some questions (before i start to make contact with breeders) that would be great.

I am in a unit- i have a dog door and a side yard is this enough room? with daily walks when the dog is old enough?

How well do they travel? i would like to take the dog with me whenever i can. would this breed suit or do they prefer to stay home?

lastly- i work full time (leave at 8.30am and return 5.30pm). I would be able to take 2 weeks of annual leave when the pup comes home. If the pup has toys ect and someone to check on him/her at lunchtime would this be ok?

Thank You for reading. :cheer:

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Darkrai   

Have a look in the Breed Specific part of this forum if you but your question in there you might get a answer, not many seem to come into here.

We have standards, we can leave them alone most of the time and they'll be contempt to just do what ever they need, but mini and toys, I think seemed to be more people attached and may frett if your going for long lengths of time.

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Hello,

I’m researching a few breeds at the moment as i have just moved home and have left the beloved family dog on the farm as i felt that this was best for her. In the past we have owned a GSD a foxie an Anatolian Sheppard and a kelpie.

At the top of my list is the miniature poodle. If someone could answer some questions (before i start to make contact with breeders) that would be great.

I am in a unit- i have a dog door and a side yard is this enough room? with daily walks when the dog is old enough?

How well do they travel? i would like to take the dog with me whenever i can. would this breed suit or do they prefer to stay home?

lastly- i work full time (leave at 8.30am and return 5.30pm). I would be able to take 2 weeks of annual leave when the pup comes home. If the pup has toys ect and someone to check on him/her at lunchtime would this be ok?

Thank You for reading. :laugh:

You'd be better off asking this in the Miniature Poodle breed thread. Head over and ask and I'll put a response in there.

The abridged answer to your question though is yes, that's enough room provided you take the dog our and they travel really well. They want to be where you are.

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moocoo   

Hello there. I have heard that toy poodles tend to be more neurotic than the minis. Is this true? Are there temperament differences between the sizes?

Also, would a good breeder ever 'cross' a toy poddle with a mini poodle, or is this bad practice? Thanks :)

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