Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Troy

German Shorthaired Pointer

69 posts in this topic

Lucyella   

GSP's are truly wonderful dogs in the right hands. They are exhuberant and loving in such a funny, clownish way, always full of character and fun to be around. Four years ago I said farewell to my last GSP at the great age of 15, she was the last of my line, I bred, owned and showed over 15 GSP's in my life from the early 70's until the late 80's and fondly remember the days of Jack Thompson and his Dunfrui dogs. GSP's came to Australia in the mid 1960's, they were mainly from English stock, some French also, and more solid than the dogs being bred today and some quite white with brown speckles. We were lucky to have a litter of pups sire by KS Elk vom Hege Haus, and my old dog was the last of his grand daughters from my bloodlines, she was beautiful.

My son has a young male GSP bred from Western Australia and may I say he's a handful, very intelligent and a great hunter, a very good looking dog, but he's demanding and strong willed and needs a firm hand, and he whinges, which is an annoying trait of this breed. I personally believe this breed must be worked in some fashion, whether it's hunting, showing, obedience, agility, it has to be utilised for what it was bred for and not expected to be left in a backyard and played with at whim, they go stir crazy unless they are worked and exercised. They need to run and play and sniff the wind, their hunting instincts are very strong. Obedience is first cab off the rank for a young pup, puppy school and then further obedience as they need to know their place in the pack very quickly otherwise they can be rumbunctious and boisterous.

Both my sons were raised with GSP's and I couldn't have wished for better dogs around little children, although they were always supervised or separated, the only way to go with dogs and kids. As for a novice owner, I wouldn't like to say no as we got our first GSP prior to kids and we had no experience with this breed, so after a couple of months owning a boisterous puppy we joined the GSP club and learnt from the experts. But they are definitely not a dog for a person who wants a quiet, gentle breed, I'd suggest something else.

Grooming is easy for this breed, a wet chux rubbed over them should do the trick, they love swimming and dry off very quickly. They're the type of dog that loves company whether it's human or another dog, they cope okay on their own but do need daily stimulation such as walking off lead (at least 1 hr) or playing tug etc., they're very good at playing chasy and love the rough stuff. GSP's are also couch potatoes, they love nothing more than being a house dog, mooching round the kitchen looking for food and greeting you with a ruff and big slobbery lick when you come home.

I would check with the GSP club for hereditary problems, there were eye issues such as entropian in the past and some epilepsy, not sure if that's still the case.

I reached the stage in my life when my GSP was 14 and I worried about what I'd do without her, I recognised that I'd struggle with an exhuberant GSP puppy so I bought a black labrador girl and my old girl just loved her. She mothered her to bits and they had twelve months together before she died and one thing she taught the labrador was first and foremost, how to be a lady. I hope I was helpful for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fraggy   

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

First time owner, and trainer for my own GSP (I am currently training my GSP in obedience and hope to trial in the next 2-3 Years).

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

I am not well versed on the breed development, but I am sure someone else may cover this aspect.

3. How common is it in Australia?

It can be common, but depends on where you may see them. I have met numerous that live locally (I even saw one stray few months ago and suspected it belonged to one that I saw walking 3 GSP's!)

4. What is the average lifespan?

According to the wiki, they are known to age around 12-14, and some can survive to 16-18 Years!

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

This is a bit tricky and can be such a touchy subjects, as there are two different colours (Liver and Liver and White, and you also have Black and Black and Whites).

Generally, they can be outgoing, joyful and a highly intelligent breed, but they are known to be very stubborn (You have been warned :cheer: lol) and have met quite a few GSP's over the last few months since starting to own Bella and boy they can be an uphill battle to train! But the earlier you nip it in the bud with a good correction and firm voice, it should help.

I am still having issues with the stubbornness in my dog and I'd have to often use correction to let her know that her behavior is unacceptable.

Now to all potential new GSP owners, with black and whites, there have been reports of aggression within the breed and I have been told probably months after purchasing my Black and White GSP that they have an aggression and also that their behaviors are not of typical with the breed compared to liver and whites. It saddens me to hear and say this, but it has to be said and known. Yes I do recognize that each breeder and breeding may have different lines and trait, but this is where extensive research and chatting to other GSP owners, breeders and handlers come into handy!

I will still love my Bella, black or white or not, but I will not lie and say that her personality is great and awesome, but she keeps rolling over and being submissive to other dogs, and the first few times to puppy socialization, she ended up snapping and snarling at other pups (Despite the fact she was well socialized at home!)

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

An owner of GSP must be committed to the breed and requires a good walk during the day (My dad does it for me as I am at work), and they need lots of training and stimulation! This is a breed that requires a lot of commitment!

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

To be honest, unless the owner is active or willing to put the effort into owning and training this breed, it is suggested to look at another breed.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Unless trained from the start, or have some type of companion, then possibly No. When my GSP went outside after disliking being in the house, she was very destructive, she would dig holes, take blankets out of her bed and drag it through the dirts (Even brand new ones!). Since then my GSP has a new companion now, and she is not as destructive as before and is quite content.

9. How much grooming is required?

Not much, a good brush here and there, and toe nails need to be kept short.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Yes they are too boisterous! I've been told they don't mature until they are 7 or 8 Years old, but again it is up to the owner to train their GSP use firm voice for every time they do the wrong thing.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

According to Wiki:

A few individuals may suffer from hip dysplasia, genetic eye diseases, epilepsy, skin disorders and cancerous lesions in the mouth, on the skin and other areas of the body.

Again, this is the responsibility to ask the breeder about history of hereditary problems in the breed.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

My advice with this breed, is to speak to variety of owners and breeders! This was a big mistake I've done unfortunately did not do my research well and I found out the real hard way of not finding out the entire truth in regards to the breeding and faults that may come through my dog (I found out at one stage that my GSP's mother was showing signs of aggression! Needless to say I was not impressed).

So it's incredibly important to talk to your breeder, find out about the hereditary problem if there is any! Talk about the parents, meet them if you can, talk about their behavior, if you can see them socialize with the other dogs, take note of them!

An honest breeder will discuss everything upfront and talk about their parents, their pups, and anything they know, but most of all, they will be upfront.

If you are considering about getting or owning a black and white GSP, make sure your research is very extensive and if you know of or someone tells you about any aggression or unusual behavior exhibiting with Black and White GSP, steer clear from them! You'd want a Black and White GSP to be typical like Liver and White, not the complete opposite.

I've learned my lesson, and I will love my GSP for as long as I will own her!

you would know

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a suburban setting do GSPs bark a lot?

I would imagine gun dogs would have to be quiet when they are out on the hunt so as not to scare off the animals, but I know very little about gun dogs in general. :o

Is there much difference in the natures between the males and females?

Are they fairly obedient, or do they use their own initiative when it comes to following commands?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fourjays   

If under stimulated, then yes, they will bark. Generally speaking, they tend to only alert bark though. Mine bark at people/dogs walking past the front of our house and sometimes at things walking down the lane way next to us. But they are perfectly happy up on the verandah watching people and dogs walk past out the back, and don't bark in that situation. They do make good watch dogs, so will bark at anything unusual.

Don't confuse a gundog at work, compared to a gundog at home - they are in different modes and therefore behave differently.

Males vs females - personally, I find my males more smoochy than my girls and my males are a bit more territorial also, so more inclined to alert bark. Have found my boys a bit more forward with other dogs also, but that is more a temperament/individual dog trait I expect.

A GSP should be "biddable" which means responsive and easily trained. Don't be too concerned about the post above this one, as most of what is written is not correct for this breed. As a working gundog, the dog must be trainable and responsive to the handler - that is a very strong gundog trait - responsiveness to training. If not trained or properly exercised and mentally stimulated - they WILL take their own intitiative and create their own fun however. They are an intelligent breed after all, and need something to do. Obedience training for at least the first 12 months of their life is a MUST. Somewhere to have off lead exercise time is also highly recommended, typically an on lead walk just does not cut it with these guys, they are a high energy breed.

In a suburban setting do GSPs bark a lot?

I would imagine gun dogs would have to be quiet when they are out on the hunt so as not to scare off the animals, but I know very little about gun dogs in general. :o

Is there much difference in the natures between the males and females?

Are they fairly obedient, or do they use their own initiative when it comes to following commands?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just got ourselves another GSP. This is our third & love them to death. They are loyal, easy to train & intelligent. Even though we don't don't have kids, when friends come around with theirs, the dogs are very well behaved.

Here are a few pics of our new pup. 10 weeks old. The older one is Banjo 12yrs old & a real gentleman.

IMG_6990_zps652aa50a.jpg

IMG_6743_zps280132c2.jpg

IMG_6922_zpsdae4329e.jpg

IMG_6990_zps652aa50a.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gsp4me   

Just adorable and love the pic with Banjo. Enjoy your Christmas with the new puppy

Kind regards

Klausnkesh GSPs

from the couch to the field

We just got ourselves another GSP. This is our third & love them to death. They are loyal, easy to train & intelligent. Even though we don't don't have kids, when friends come around with theirs, the dogs are very well behaved.

Here are a few pics of our new pup. 10 weeks old. The older one is Banjo 12yrs old & a real gentleman.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zenith   

Congrats on your gorgeous new pup Pinarelloman, and Banjo is gorgeous too, love his greying out on his face. Our newest GSP is 10 weeks also, and he's been an absolute joy to train and live with so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Snowysal   

Hi everyone ! Been a VERY long time since I posted - is it still active at all?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×