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gsdog2

Dectomax Injectable

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My 9mth old GSD has been diagnosed with demodectic mange and had the first of a six week course of Dectomax injections. I have googled Dectomax injectable and all I can find is that it's only used on cattle and swines. The only reference to dogs that I can find is that it shouldn't be used on dogs as it can be FATAL :champagne: !!!!

She's due for her next injection tomorrow and as you can imagine I'm reluctant to go ahead with it until I can find more information. My question is the good, the bad and ugly experiences anyone has had with this injection - I know there are other forms of treatment and I will get to that if I decide against this particular treatment.

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it is commonly used off label by veterinarians.

It is fatal to dogs who show a genetic sensitivity to the active ingredient, commonly collies etc

if you do a search on demodex here on DOL there are severe threads on it and the different treatments/diets. Since it is linked with a poor immune system you should also be looking into a better diet, supplements etc

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This is the site :-

http://www.drugs.com/vet/dectomax-injectable-solution.html

and this is the precaution:-

Precautions: Dectomax Has Been Developed Specifically For Use In Cattle And Swine Only. This Product Should Not Be Used In Other Animal Species As Severe Adverse Reactions, Including Fatalities In Dogs, May Result.

Thanks Nekhbet I have searched DOL and all comments were positive although most are more to do with various treatments of mange and not the Dectomax injection itself.

I understand it can be diet related however I doubt that's the case with her. She was desexed a week prior to the mange appearing and my vet said she was days off coming into season when she had surgery (8mths). I'm guessing hormones may have played a part or possibly a reaction to surgery.

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it is an ivomectin based product hence the warning - again coming down to the genetic allergy in some breeds.

I have seen a lot of dogs get the injections at the clinics I worked at and they were all fine. Unfortunately on the same poor diets the demodex remained.

she could have a hormonal period, but it is still immune mediated. Her immune system is not fighting off the mite that all dogs carry, look into some supplements to help her through it :grouphug:

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it is an ivomectin based product hence the warning - again coming down to the genetic allergy in some breeds.

I have seen a lot of dogs get the injections at the clinics I worked at and they were all fine. Unfortunately on the same poor diets the demodex remained.

she could have a hormonal period, but it is still immune mediated. Her immune system is not fighting off the mite that all dogs carry, look into some supplements to help her through it :grouphug:

Any suggestions as to a good supplement?

I'm still interested to know if anyone's dog has had an adverse reaction to this drug

Edited by gsdog2

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it is an ivomectin based product hence the warning - again coming down to the genetic allergy in some breeds.

I have seen a lot of dogs get the injections at the clinics I worked at and they were all fine. Unfortunately on the same poor diets the demodex remained.

she could have a hormonal period, but it is still immune mediated. Her immune system is not fighting off the mite that all dogs carry, look into some supplements to help her through it :grouphug:

I wouldn't have thought Large Puppy Eukanuba, puppy milk, whole chicken frames and raw vegetables are poor diet though :(

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Is it localised or generalised ?

Personally I'd start with the more conservative options first and would use injections only as an absolute last resort, if all else failed

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Is it localised or generalised ?

Personally I'd start with the more conservative options first and would use injections only as an absolute last resort, if all else failed

It's localised - 20c size on side of muzzle. I know someone who has two pups around same age from same breeder (different litters) and both have demodectic mange and treating them with a wash. My girl is prone to skin problems (has also had puppy pyoderma), although it's fine atm, so I assumed that was the reason he was using this particular treatment. However when I asked the question I was told this is a safer method for both owner and dog, and also more successful.

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The poor diet comment was for a few dogs that came through the clinic. The best my boss offered was z/d which I just see as useless in most animals and crammed with rubbish. Most vets do not know or wont recommend diet changes for skin problems - meds first, if that fails try z/d, if that fails pack you off to the specialist. It ends up being a merry-go-round of drugs and doctors.

I'd take her off majority dry food or at least dry food that has so much grain in it - euk puppy has rice, barley, sorghum, beet pulp and corn. They also use chicken by product meal as the second ingredient which is far from having much more then the 'useless' parts of the chook like heads, feet, intestines, innerds etc

especially if your dog has already shown signs of a skin condition I would decrease the amount of grains going in. The furthest with dry food to go would probably be the RC german shepherd puppy but that contains rice and beet pulp, at least better then multiple grains. If you are game why not try a completely raw diet? There is a great thread and many breeders on here have raised their pups on raw diets before.

my bordeaux came with a great case of folliculitis and it flares up with wheat/high grain foods. I've found that less is more with grains, the less that goes in and a more natural diet you can provide the better the skin and the less outbreaks you get.

as for immune supplements I use an immune booster made my the Melaluca company (on dogs AND OH) and boy do the allergies and skin infections settle after use. I'll have to find the bottle for you later

Edited by Nekhbet

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it is an ivomectin based product hence the warning - again coming down to the genetic allergy in some breeds.

I have seen a lot of dogs get the injections at the clinics I worked at and they were all fine. Unfortunately on the same poor diets the demodex remained.

she could have a hormonal period, but it is still immune mediated. Her immune system is not fighting off the mite that all dogs carry, look into some supplements to help her through it :grouphug:

I wouldn't have thought Large Puppy Eukanuba, puppy milk, whole chicken frames and raw vegetables are poor diet though :(

Pups don't need milk. I'd be getting rid of that.

Vegetables = How are you perparing them. If they are not prepared properly they will be of no use.

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Is it localised or generalised ?

Personally I'd start with the more conservative options first and would use injections only as an absolute last resort, if all else failed

It's localised - 20c size on side of muzzle. I know someone who has two pups around same age from same breeder (different litters) and both have demodectic mange and treating them with a wash. My girl is prone to skin problems (has also had puppy pyoderma), although it's fine atm, so I assumed that was the reason he was using this particular treatment. However when I asked the question I was told this is a safer method for both owner and dog, and also more successful.

That's a very aggressive treatment for such a small area, that may clear up on it's own anyway.

Did the vet go through other option such as using Advocate ? or Demodex wash ?

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they make more money on the injections there SBT123

I agree quite a lot of medication for a small spot particularly when underlying problems with skin are not being addressed already by the vet.

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Sounds like a bit of over kill to me.

I would just use the Ivermec in the liquid form.

Years ago I had dog with it. I just gave it Ivermec liquid and also rubbed the Ivermec on the spot twice a day and it was gone in a week.

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To me it's madness and complete overkill. I'd be seeking a second opinion on what treatment to start out with.

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Nekhbet I had already thought about changing her over from a grain based diet, but I have to say her skin has been fine over winter so I've left her on the Eukanuba. With summer here (in Qld anyway) I will look into changing her diet. I would like the name of the immune booster when you find it :)

SBT123 no, I wasn't offered any other option. I have never had a dog with this problem before, but I do remember in the past it was a VERY difficult problem to treat, so I accepted the fact that this was the treatment required. It was only when I spoke to the owner of the other pups that I started asking questions - rang the vet, got on the net and DOL.

oakway the milk is something she had when she was younger and is a rare treat now ;) Raw vegies are given at work (she comes to work with me) to munch on as bones are a bit smelley in the office :banghead:

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Nekhbet I had already thought about changing her over from a grain based diet, but I have to say her skin has been fine over winter so I've left her on the Eukanuba. With summer here (in Qld anyway) I will look into changing her diet. I would like the name of the immune booster when you find it :)

SBT123 no, I wasn't offered any other option. I have never had a dog with this problem before, but I do remember in the past it was a VERY difficult problem to treat, so I accepted the fact that this was the treatment required. It was only when I spoke to the owner of the other pups that I started asking questions - rang the vet, got on the net and DOL.

oakway the milk is something she had when she was younger and is a rare treat now ;) Raw vegies are given at work (she comes to work with me) to munch on as bones are a bit smelley in the office :banghead:

Hi,

Raw veggies won't hurt her, but they do no good either.Veggies are full of cellulose and dogs cant digest it unless you liquefy then in a processor or put them through a juicer. If you use a juicer just add the pulp to the liquid. Then add to the dog food.

Cheers.

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Do you treat for heartworm and fleas ?

If so, you are already using some chemicals, so why not switch to Advocate for three months and give that a go.

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Do you treat for heartworm and fleas ?

If so, you are already using some chemicals, so why not switch to Advocate for three months and give that a go.

No, we're lucky not to have a flea problem here, so no flea treatment needed (luckily, 'cause I'm sure she'd have flea allergies :) ). I do treat her with monthly HWT (Heartguard).

I'm noting all comments down and will be asking vet tomorrow about Advocate or Demodex wash.

It seems as though there hasn't been a lot of adverse reactions to Dectomax injections which is interesting.

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I'm noting all comments down and will be asking vet tomorrow about Advocate or Demodex wash.

It seems as though there hasn't been a lot of adverse reactions to Dectomax injections which is interesting.

Over the years have had to treat dogs for demodectic mange on several occasions, and can say that the more recently available Dectomax treatment over 6 weeks provided a vast improvement over the older methods.

Have given 6 week courses of it in both the oral and injectible, (different dogs - both under veterinary supervision) A pup treated with oral Dectomax used to slurp it happily off the syringe but the Ivomectin was obviously very bad tasting and had to be forced down. Only used the Ivormectin once before going back to Dectomax. Eventually found the weekly Dectomax injections easier to do over 6 weeks rather than the daily oral dose.

Very good, permanent results and no harmful effects. Several cases were quite bad prior to treatment and we became unwilling "Demodex experts" over the years. I have developed a few personal theories which do not fit with commonly held beliefs and armed with this knowledge, have not had a single incident for years.

The washes which contain Amitraz are very poisonous and purely vile for both dog and handler. IMO, would go with Dectomax injections every time but you must find a vet who is up with the research and the chemical's use in treating dogs.

Dectomax is just a new generation "ivermectin type" chemical. That is why it could be fatal to susceptible dogs (those which carry a genetic mutation allowing the chemical to cross the blood/brain barrier. Some collie lines and similar can have this.

Good luck with your girl. Hope the demodex is soon just a memory.

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You can try Advocate but it ideally needs to be fortnightly, the derm Vets have reported treatment failures on it so it's no longer treatment of choice for demodex or sarcoptes. The rep seemed to mutter something about it being good for maintenance but not in initial treatment which really translates to 'once they're all dead it will keep it away'.

We use a fair bit of dectomax for the dogs we treat in an indigenous community and they are far more immuno compromised due to other parasites and previously malnutrition- no deaths so far.

I agree about boosting the immune system, but something like a powdered supplement from Carole Bryant (Berigora Farm) might be more beneficial.

If it were my dog I'd be knocking it on the head personally, have seen demodex treated by other Vets in the past and it gets to uncontrolled stage quickly in some dogs. :wave:

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