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How Much Exercise For A Kelpie Puppy?


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Hi, we are looking at getting a 4 month old Kelpie puppy. Just curious as to how much exercise should they get? Our last dog was a giant breed who you had to be careful about running/jumping etc under 12 months. Are kelpies the same or can they be a bit more vigorous? It's been awhile since I had a puppy!

Cheers

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Hi, we are looking at getting a 4 month old Kelpie puppy. Just curious as to how much exercise should they get? Our last dog was a giant breed who you had to be careful about running/jumping etc under 12 months. Are kelpies the same or can they be a bit more vigorous? It's been awhile since I had a puppy!

Cheers

We have Kelpie X siblings (now 5 1/2 months).

They have a big walk in the morning were they get some off lead time to tire themselves out. They LOVE to run.

They then sleep most of the day about 10.30-3pm.

They have some play time and training in the PM, or another short walk.

If you don't have time to amuse your kelpie it will get bored and destructive. You can have a "legal" sand pit where they can dig and lots of toys they can rip up!

Hope that helps! :D

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Hi, we are looking at getting a 4 month old Kelpie puppy. Just curious as to how much exercise should they get? Our last dog was a giant breed who you had to be careful about running/jumping etc under 12 months. Are kelpies the same or can they be a bit more vigorous? It's been awhile since I had a puppy!

Cheers

Hi Baslebear, Depends on if its working or bench kelpie. I have 2 kelpies one 10months old and one 16months old. They both love to run, but like all breeds you still have to watch their growth. My girl has been doing herding since she was 6 months old, but in saying that it was very light training she was doing nothing that was going to be detrimental to her growth, They are both bench kelpies , but the girl has more drive than the boy. They both get an hr cross country run of a morning, sleep all day and if im home early enough in the arv get another walk, just a short one then some ball play. I am an active person anyway so they are perfect for me. As my vet always says, the most common complaint in a kelpie is , that they have fallen out of the back of a ute, they are pretty robust in their structure, but you still have to be careful in their early months.

Edited by sandra64
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Thanks guys,

I am unsure of type she is, she is a rescue puppy. I plan on taking her (if it all works out and I can adopt her) for a run for at least 30-40 minutes every morning (if not a run then at least a long walk), cycling on weekends and walking every afternoon. Don't worry I know how much they need, I was just not sure how early I could start doing all that. It's been awhile since I have had a puppy that wasn't a giant breed!

Oh and will be taking her to obedience training, and hope to get into agility when she is old enough.

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Thanks guys,

I am unsure of type she is, she is a rescue puppy. I plan on taking her (if it all works out and I can adopt her) for a run for at least 30-40 minutes every morning (if not a run then at least a long walk), cycling on weekends and walking every afternoon. Don't worry I know how much they need, I was just not sure how early I could start doing all that. It's been awhile since I have had a puppy that wasn't a giant breed!

Oh and will be taking her to obedience training, and hope to get into agility when she is old enough.

I'm not an expert but that sounds like quite a lot to me for a 4 month old? Especially if she's on leash so has to keep running at a certain pace to keep up with you or a bike. I thought the rule of thumb for walks was around 5 mins per each month of age - so maybe you could do 20 mins or so morning and afternoon, and take it slowly with the cycling.

I don't know kelpies at all though, so maybe this doesn't apply...

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Thanks guys,

I am unsure of type she is, she is a rescue puppy. I plan on taking her (if it all works out and I can adopt her) for a run for at least 30-40 minutes every morning (if not a run then at least a long walk), cycling on weekends and walking every afternoon. Don't worry I know how much they need, I was just not sure how early I could start doing all that. It's been awhile since I have had a puppy that wasn't a giant breed!

Oh and will be taking her to obedience training, and hope to get into agility when she is old enough.

I'm not an expert but that sounds like quite a lot to me for a 4 month old? Especially if she's on leash so has to keep running at a certain pace to keep up with you or a bike. I thought the rule of thumb for walks was around 5 mins per each month of age - so maybe you could do 20 mins or so morning and afternoon, and take it slowly with the cycling.

I don't know kelpies at all though, so maybe this doesn't apply...

I know hence the question!! Obviously, I wouldn't do that if it wasn't good for her, it's what I would like to do eventually though, and was wondering just how much a kelpie pup actually can cope with. I just don't know how early to start that!

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My 5 month old kelpie pup gets 30 mins walking morning and night, taking a different route in the morning to the one at night so he doesn't get bored. I do about 6 or 8 training sessions a day with him. He has some chews around and a comfort teddy when he's on his own but otherwise he prefers my company. I don't take him for runs and wont be until he's 12 months old at least, same with the cycling IMO.

If you raise her to be calm you will have a calm dog. If you hype her up she will be easily excitable. What you do with her now will determine what kind of adult she will grow into. The more you teach her now the easier she will be to teach when she is older.

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Kelpies don't need lots of physical exercise but they need heaps to think about or they will find things to amuse themselves that you won't always appreciate. I started walking my pups at about 3 a half to 4 months. Before that they just played in the yard (about an acre) with the other dogs or with me. I don't run but I have the luxury of my own paddocks so my dogs can run and play off lead when walking. As they get older I increase the length of the walks and they learn to work sheep. Sheep are the greatest motivator. My dogs know that they have to walk quietly beside me to get to the paddock and to sit and wait while I open the gate, wait to be called through and then sit again before being released. Walking on loose lead and doing stays at dog club are easy compared to the self discipline they need to wait until being told to cast to get the sheep. My dogs know that when they come inside they have quiet time and all are total couch potatoes who sleep for most of the day.

If you don't have sheep you will have to find something else of great value to reward your pup. Kelpies are bred to work with people and as long as you are consistent and clear in what you want, they love to be a part of a team and be told they are good. Two walks a day will be fine. They don't have to include running, but need to be interesting. When you get back from your walk please don't think you've given your dog all it needs. Kelpies love to be inside with you and will settle wherever you are. They need time with you more than anything. I've done lots of scent work - hiding a toy and sending the dog to find it, dropping a glove on a walk and sending the dog back to look for it etc. Don't try this on walks around the streets but you can do a lot in your own backyard. Kelpie pups are not calm but they do grow up to be calm sensible adults. Use lots of rewards and don't over correct. Kelpies are bred for initiative and to work away from people and make their own decisions. They will shut down if constantly corrected.

If she is a typical Kelpie she will love being with you and will accept other people (she may be shy and not overly friendly with strangers but the chances of her showing aggression are very slight.) She will enjoy obedience especially if you get to the higher levels but may get bored with heeling. More than likely she will love agility and will amaze you with her distance work but you'd better make sure you get your timing right and give your commands in plenty of time or you'll have a frustrated spinning, barking dog on your hands.

Congratulations on your choice of breed. Good luck with the adoption. I hope all works out well for you.

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