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Chia Seed - Is It Safe For Dogs?

#1 User is offline   Tapua 

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Posted 10 February 2011 - 07:24 AM

We were thinking of adding Chia seed to our dogs diet but I am unsure it is OK for dogs. We grind our own beef and vegies and I was thinking we could add the seed through the grinder to crack it. Has anyone used Chia seed?

This post has been edited by Tapua: 10 February 2011 - 07:25 AM


#2 User is offline   Natsu chan 

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Posted 10 February 2011 - 10:12 AM

Yep they're safe for dogs. This company here sells them in packages for dogs with a dosage chart on the back:

http://www.animalhealthstore.com.au/dogs/f...hia-equine.html

#3 User is offline   Stolzseinrotts 

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Posted 10 February 2011 - 09:50 PM

Tapua,

I believe from memory you need to add as required, cracking it as you say or placing it in moisture will activate the seed but its properties once activated only last for certain period, hence adding it to food as required is the best way to administer it. We have been using it for some time and the dogs coats are looking great. A little goes a long way!

#4 User is offline   Tapua 

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 08:11 AM

View PostStolzseinrotts, on 10th Feb 2011 - 10:50 PM, said:

Tapua,

I believe from memory you need to add as required, cracking it as you say or placing it in moisture will activate the seed but its properties once activated only last for certain period, hence adding it to food as required is the best way to administer it. We have been using it for some time and the dogs coats are looking great. A little goes a long way!


OK I was wondering about that - we will go with soaking before we use it - I was wondering how often per week do you add to their feed?

#5 User is offline   sas 

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 10:30 AM

Yep, it's safe my dogs had it for a very long time, I would make up a container which I added water to to make a gel which is safe to keep in the fridge for up to 3 weeks.

For Danes we added 1 tablespoon.

I actually have half a bag here that anyone is welcome to, it lasts forever.

This post has been edited by MEH: 11 February 2011 - 10:30 AM


#6 Guest_english.ivy_*

Posted 11 February 2011 - 10:58 AM

What goodness does it give the dogs?

I'm going to start making my dogs food so looking into what I can add which they will get goodness from.

I've got garlic, kelp and puree veg so far ..

#7 User is offline   trifecta 

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 04:38 PM

View Postenglish.ivy, on 11th Feb 2011 - 11:58 AM, said:

What goodness does it give the dogs?

I'm going to start making my dogs food so looking into what I can add which they will get goodness from.

I've got garlic, kelp and puree veg so far ..


Be very careful with garlic & kelp, english ivy. Garlic is a member of the Allium family, the onion genus, so potentially poisonous in large amounts. I used to feed garlic now & again, but one of my dogs who has an auto-immune disorder is unable to stomach it, so I have ceased feeding it.

Kelp should be fed only two or three times per week to avoid excess iodine uptake which is harmful.

Chia seed is rich in omega 3 fatty acids. I would imagine it would have similar nutritional characteristics to flax seed (linseed). If the seed is fed, then it would double as a source of fibre. I am going to look into chia seed myself, as the dog I referred to above is unable to process fats in the liver & is consequently unable to digest flaxseed or fish oil, no matter how small the amount.

#8 Guest_english.ivy_*

Posted 11 February 2011 - 04:50 PM

View Posttrifecta, on 11th Feb 2011 - 02:38 PM, said:

View Postenglish.ivy, on 11th Feb 2011 - 11:58 AM, said:

What goodness does it give the dogs?

I'm going to start making my dogs food so looking into what I can add which they will get goodness from.

I've got garlic, kelp and puree veg so far ..


Be very careful with garlic & kelp, english ivy. Garlic is a member of the Allium family, the onion genus, so potentially poisonous in large amounts. I used to feed garlic now & again, but one of my dogs who has an auto-immune disorder is unable to stomach it, so I have ceased feeding it.

Kelp should be fed only two or three times per week to avoid excess iodine uptake which is harmful.

Chia seed is rich in omega 3 fatty acids. I would imagine it would have similar nutritional characteristics to flax seed (linseed). If the seed is fed, then it would double as a source of fibre. I am going to look into chia seed myself, as the dog I referred to above is unable to process fats in the liver & is consequently unable to digest flaxseed or fish oil, no matter how small the amount.


I ran out of garlic the other week so hmm maybe I won't buy anymore for them. They don't get fleas anyway.

Might read into chia for the dogs. I was looking at taking it myself but wasn't sure if it was just a fad, so to speak.

Thanks for the heads up on garlic and kelp :laugh:

#9 User is offline   peigirl 

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 04:51 PM

View Posttrifecta, on 11th Feb 2011 - 02:38 PM, said:

View Postenglish.ivy, on 11th Feb 2011 - 11:58 AM, said:

What goodness does it give the dogs?

I'm going to start making my dogs food so looking into what I can add which they will get goodness from.

I've got garlic, kelp and puree veg so far ..


Be very careful with garlic & kelp, english ivy. Garlic is a member of the Allium family, the onion genus, so potentially poisonous in large amounts. I used to feed garlic now & again, but one of my dogs who has an auto-immune disorder is unable to stomach it, so I have ceased feeding it.

Kelp should be fed only two or three times per week to avoid excess iodine uptake which is harmful.

Chia seed is rich in omega 3 fatty acids. I would imagine it would have similar nutritional characteristics to flax seed (linseed). If the seed is fed, then it would double as a source of fibre. I am going to look into chia seed myself, as the dog I referred to above is unable to process fats in the liver & is consequently unable to digest flaxseed or fish oil, no matter how small the amount.


Unfortunately you will most likely exacerbate the problem then. I worked for the company who introduced chia seed to Australia for 5 years and have experimented with the whole seed, crushed, ground, straight oil products etc on and off over the years. The high oil content will give dogs with sensitive tummies the squirts.

Add to food as required and dont grind in advance as once the seed is broken the oil will begin to oxidise.

#10 User is offline   Danois 

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 07:23 PM

Hey sas - can I grab the chia seed? I must owe you some more sizzlers now :laugh:

#11 User is offline   sas 

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 08:20 PM

View Postpeigirl, on 11th Feb 2011 - 05:51 PM, said:

Unfortunately you will most likely exacerbate the problem then. I worked for the company who introduced chia seed to Australia for 5 years and have experimented with the whole seed, crushed, ground, straight oil products etc on and off over the years. The high oil content will give dogs with sensitive tummies the squirts.

Add to food as required and dont grind in advance as once the seed is broken the oil will begin to oxidise.


We have great stools whilst on Chia Seed, no issues at all.

For a dog with issues you would have to start at a low dose and work up and would be a good idea to consult a holistic Vet who is familar with Chia Seed.

This post has been edited by MEH: 11 February 2011 - 08:21 PM


#12 User is offline   sas 

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 08:20 PM

View PostDanois, on 11th Feb 2011 - 08:23 PM, said:

Hey sas - can I grab the chia seed? I must owe you some more sizzlers now :)


:D Sure!

#13 User is offline   Stolzseinrotts 

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 09:27 PM

View PostTapua, on 11th Feb 2011 - 09:11 AM, said:

View PostStolzseinrotts, on 10th Feb 2011 - 10:50 PM, said:

Tapua,

I believe from memory you need to add as required, cracking it as you say or placing it in moisture will activate the seed but its properties once activated only last for certain period, hence adding it to food as required is the best way to administer it. We have been using it for some time and the dogs coats are looking great. A little goes a long way!


OK I was wondering about that - we will go with soaking before we use it - I was wondering how often per week do you add to their feed?


I add when I remember to add it, maybe three to four times a week and sometimes it may be over a week before I add it. It really depends on what the dogs are getting fed. We do a BARF style diet with our guys, so we can feed meaty bones for days and miss meals as such for a few more.

I have been taking it as well as the OH, I don't have it everyday it depends on what I have for breakfast, but I do find in very high in fibre for the humans and the dogs, you only need to use no more than a teaspoon at a time for both, we have Rottweilers so a large dog. I think it is a super product and it gives a nutty type flavour so it is very tasty as well as extremely benificial.

ETA; I have a dog that does not do well with flaxseed oil, he gets itchy when I use it with him. I use Chia with him and have swapped all of ours over to Chia, all are doing very well on it!

This post has been edited by Stolzseinrotts: 11 February 2011 - 09:31 PM


#14 User is offline   trifecta 

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 10:57 AM

View Postpeigirl, on 11th Feb 2011 - 05:51 PM, said:

View Posttrifecta, on 11th Feb 2011 - 02:38 PM, said:

View Postenglish.ivy, on 11th Feb 2011 - 11:58 AM, said:

What goodness does it give the dogs?

I'm going to start making my dogs food so looking into what I can add which they will get goodness from.

I've got garlic, kelp and puree veg so far ..


Be very careful with garlic & kelp, english ivy. Garlic is a member of the Allium family, the onion genus, so potentially poisonous in large amounts. I used to feed garlic now & again, but one of my dogs who has an auto-immune disorder is unable to stomach it, so I have ceased feeding it.

Kelp should be fed only two or three times per week to avoid excess iodine uptake which is harmful.

Chia seed is rich in omega 3 fatty acids. I would imagine it would have similar nutritional characteristics to flax seed (linseed). If the seed is fed, then it would double as a source of fibre. I am going to look into chia seed myself, as the dog I referred to above is unable to process fats in the liver & is consequently unable to digest flaxseed or fish oil, no matter how small the amount.


Unfortunately you will most likely exacerbate the problem then. I worked for the company who introduced chia seed to Australia for 5 years and have experimented with the whole seed, crushed, ground, straight oil products etc on and off over the years. The high oil content will give dogs with sensitive tummies the squirts.

Add to food as required and dont grind in advance as once the seed is broken the oil will begin to oxidise.


Thanks for the tip, peigirl, although he doesn't get the squirts, but needs to rush out outside, eat copious amounts of grass & vomit about 10 minutes later :) . Fish oil is the worst, I am up & down all night letting him in & out...... we just don't get any sleep at all as he yips to go out & then barks if he is left outside!


I actually feed very few supplements, just a tsp of granulated rose hips every couple of days for vitamin C. The dogs get a varied BARF diet so get all the nutrients they need from their food.

#15 User is offline   oakway 

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 12:01 PM

View Posttrifecta, on 11th Feb 2011 - 04:38 PM, said:

View Postenglish.ivy, on 11th Feb 2011 - 11:58 AM, said:

What goodness does it give the dogs?

I'm going to start making my dogs food so looking into what I can add which they will get goodness from.

I've got garlic, kelp and puree veg so far ..


Be very careful with garlic & kelp, english ivy. Garlic is a member of the Allium family, the onion genus, so potentially poisonous in large amounts. I used to feed garlic now & again, but one of my dogs who has an auto-immune disorder is unable to stomach it, so I have ceased feeding it.

Kelp should be fed only two or three times per week to avoid excess iodine uptake which is harmful.

Chia seed is rich in omega 3 fatty acids. I would imagine it would have similar nutritional characteristics to flax seed (linseed). If the seed is fed, then it would double as a source of fibre. I am going to look into chia seed myself, as the dog I referred to above is unable to process fats in the liver & is consequently unable to digest flaxseed or fish oil, no matter how small the amount.



:)

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