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RuralPug

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About RuralPug

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    Totally Puggered Willbooker DD
  • Birthday 06/01/1959

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  1. Tibbie hair loss

    Did the blood tests include thyroid tests? How old is she? Are there any other symptoms apart from the hair loss? Does she have any history of illness or allergic reactions? What is her diet? What sort of exercise does she have on a daily basis? As far as I am aware, alopecia due to ovarian cysts is extremely rare indeed.
  2. DNA testing for mixed breed dogs

    Bull Arab types like your dog often superficially resemble Great Danes, for much the same reason that a dolphin resembles a shark, without any direct familial connection. It is the ideal shape for their purpose (boar hunting). Some Bull Arab types do have Great Dane in their mix and some do not and you will often find that they look very much alike whether or not they have GD ancestry. I would not stress about his mix You love him and you have come to love a breed that he resembles. I'm assuming that your stated age of 13 years is a typo, very large breeds do not often live that long as their hearts wear out earlier. So he is 3yo approximately? I second the embark test, not so much for breed ID, but because it will pick up on any future health problems and because very large dogs cost more to medicate etc. it is wise to be forewarned.The expense of the embark test is worth it.
  3. Children's probiotics for my dog

    Does he have a loose stool if you walk him elsewhere than the beach for a few days? It might be as simple as him ingesting seawater or kelp. Worth a try.
  4. Did insincts to chase and kill

    This would probably happen again if your dog was put in the same circumstances. Now that you know, it is your job to never put that dog in such a position again. Don't take the dog to visit places where small furry animals live. It might be a nice gesture if you were to offer to buy a suitable replacement guinea pig for your sister.
  5. shetland sheepdog ears

    With my breed we use surgical tape to keep growing ears in position. I believe that this is also used (in a different way) by Collie and possibly Sheltie breeders to help "tip" the ear. If you are having problems with the glue, perhaps you could try taping. There are videos on the internet demonstrating how to tape Collie and Sheltie ears.
  6. I am sorry, you won't want to hear this, but good fencing is the only way to keep him safe. That way he will not have access to cars in the first place, except for a safe wreck that you have placed in his yard for him to crawl under when he is anxious. Take him out on a lead for daily walks and the rest of the time keep him safe behind good fences.
  7. Please don't take this the wrong way, but I find it quite concerning that you are choosing between two breeds with completely different temperaments and activity levels which suit completely different lifestyles. I'm not sure what you have based your choices on, but it really should be based on your family lifestyle and how much time you can devote to your dog and how much and what type of responsiveness you require from them. If you are giving a high priority to low shedding, bear in mind that the lowest shedding breeds have the highest grooming needs which will take a LOT more time to keep the coat in shape than high shedding breeds which, generally speaking, you can minimise shedding by a 10 minute grooming session every other day for a small breed. The Furminator is designed to remove loose undercoat so is best used on double coated breeds. The other thing to remember about low shedding is that allergy to actual dog hair is rare, the common allergy is to dog dander (skin flakes) so amount of shedding won't affect the allergy. Poodles - What size poodle are you looking at? In Australia, my experience has been that the three sizes of poodle have different temperaments. They are all very intelligent, however it seems to me that most of the Toy Poodles and some of the Miniature Poodles do tend toward neurotic behaviour, which I have never observed in Standard Poodles. If you want a Toy or Mini I would recommend finding a breeder who has had a great deal of success in gaining obedience and/or dog sport titles with their stock. Poodles are a lot of dog, so unless you are willing to dedicate your life to dog sports, obedience work or similar activities to keep their brains busy, please don't get one. Just my opinion. Poodles do shed, but due to their coat structure the shed hair remains in the coat and does not drop onto your carpets or furniture, which is why they need an enormous amount of grooming compared with most other breeds. You need to cost in the time needed for at home grooming to keep them free of matted coat plus the expense of regular six weekly professional grooming. You can call around the grooming salons near you to get an idea of pricing. It is recommended that you choose a poodle breeder who uses sires and dams that have (a) passed the x-rays for Hip Dysplasia (and Legg-Perthes Disease in Minis and Toys), (b) are clear of Patella Luxation, (c) have been passed clear of the myriad eye diseases (including PRA and cataracts) to which poodles are prone , (d) have been DNA tested as clear of Von Willebrand's Disease and (e) have tested clear of any thyroid malfunction. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel - this is ,generally speaking, a much more laid back dog than the poodle. However, they are a companion breed and can get anxious if left too much to themselves. They have a single coat and a Furminator is not needed. A simple comb or pin brush used thoroughly every second or third day will minimise shedding and is also required to keep the silky coat from tangling. They are perhaps not quite as intelligent as the poodle but more than make up for that with their devotion which makes them eager to please - which is why cavs are often prize winners in obedience. It is recommended that you choose a Cavalier breeder who uses sires and dams that have (a) screened as clear of any heart murmur (b) have been screened clear of the several types of eye diseases that were once common in this breed, (c) are clear of Patella Luxation, and (d) have been DNA tested clear (or are clear by parentage) of Curly Coat Syndrome. Sorry, this has turned into War and Peace lengthwise! But I suppose the point I am trying to make is that before you ask for recommendations of breeders, you should more thoroughly research to establish the breed that will suit you best.
  8. Buying a puppy

    Yes, remember that the best ANKC breeders are not just producing puppies for the cash, and won't consider you a customer as such - they are looking to place their babies in the right homes with people who will treasure them for life and can give them the best things in life too. Look on this as a major life decision rather than a buying choice - after all, this pup or older dog will be a member of your family for possibly fifteen years or more. Not something to rush headlong into - better to build a rapport with breeders than to expect them to act like used car salesmen eager to make a sale LOL. Even when breeders do have a pup available, there is no guarantee that they will think they have a pup exactly suitable for you. Especially in the less common breeds (and certainly with quality breeders of the really popular breeds) you may have to court the breeder - sell yourself to them as someone worthy to own one of their precious pups. LOL it is almost the opposite of buying from a puppy farm or pet shop!
  9. Very odd that article doesn't show any pics of an adult Dandie in show trim - one of those breeds where most people either love them or think they are ugly! A relative of mine, seeing a pair at a dog show once, said they looked like a SWF designed by a committee, which cracked me up
  10. Walkies!! please help a newbie out!

    I love that you are so keen to ensure that your boy has every opportunity to excel! Once he is six months old and doesn't need as much sleep, then is probably the time to look into regular classes and sports etc. In the meantime - keep doing what you are doing, join FB groups like Canine Enrichment to keep his brain busy at home, take him out and about each day for short times to different nearby places where he is going to experience lots of different stuff - construction sites, outdoor shopping malls, beaches/pools, markets, sit and watch the kids at the local BMX/skateboard park - yeah, you will have to work to make sure he isn't mobbed by passerbys wanting to pet the cute baby BUT meeting lots of people one or two at a time for a half- hour or so several times a week is excellent socialisation. As for learning to play with/get along with other dogs, this is best done only with dogs you already know and trust and you can arrange short playdates with them. Avoid areas where uncontrolled dogs might be loose ( I'm pretty sure you know that already anyway). And why not advertise for Eskimos - you never know until you ask LOL
  11. Walkies!! please help a newbie out!

    LOL I suspect that a 6 hours puppy school course means six one hourly sessions, probably once a week? Or maybe twelve half hourly sessions.
  12. What Breed Is My Dog?

    DNA testing for breed type was really useless in the early stages when the DNA markers for only the most common US breeds were held! So if you had a known kelpie/ACD cross for example it might come back as a border collie cross OES or something LOL It has improved since but only if you use one of the better labs.
  13. Japanese Spitz Breeds

    Congrats. This is the first I have heard of the Hokkaido, but a little bit of googling and I see he is also known as the Ainu dog, which I have heard of as being popular in hunting circles. Glad you have found a pet to cherish!
  14. socializing pups at shows

    Baby puppies can actually be shown from 12 weeks of age - obviously the breeder will be choosing the vaccination routine that allows this. Puppies younger than that may be at risk, but perhaps these breeders consider that the risk at a dog show is a lot less than the risk in a dog park or random area where unvaccinated dogs wander. I've seen it too, not often, but occasionally.
  15. What Breed Is My Dog?

    Smooth coated border collies are very common in Australia. You girl looks reasonably pure to me, so I would assume that the father was a smooth coat. The rough coat gene is actually a simple recessive, which means that a puppy must get a rough coat gene from BOTH parents before it will have a long (called rough) coat. Therefore if you mate two rough coats together, they cannot produce any smooth coat puppies. Two smooth coats border collies mated together however, MIGHT produce a rough coat if both parents carried one smooth and one rough gene and the puppy got the rough gene from each parent. The genetics of ear set on the border collie is not so simple, however. Whether the ears will be erect or semi erect seems to be due to a combination of genes and not just one - in fact, it can happen they they will have one erect ear and the other semi- erect!
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