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Troy

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

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Troy   

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/Breed_Details.aspx?bid=96 )

Group: Group 3 (Gundogs)

General Appearance: The Toller is a medium-sized, powerful, compact, balanced, well-muscled dog; medium to heavy in bone, with a high degree of agility, alertness and determination. Many Tollers have a slightly sad expression until they go to work, when their aspect changes to intense concentration and excitement. At work, the dog has a speeding, rushing action, with the head carried out almost level with the back and heavily feathered tail in constant motion.

Characteristics: A strong and able swimmer, he is a natural and tenacious retriever on land and from water, setting himself for springy action the moment the slightest indication is given that retrieving is required. His strong retrieving desire and playfulness are qualities essential to his tolling ability.

Temperament: The Toller is highly intelligent, easy to train and has great endurance. Loving and playful to his family, he can be reserved with strangers, without being aggressive or overly shy. Aggression is not to be tolerated.

Head And Skull: Skull- The head, which should be in proportion to the body size, is clean-cut and slightly wedge-shaped when viewed from above. The broad skull is only slightly rounded, the occiput not prominent and the cheeks flat. Length from occiput to stop should roughly equal that of stop to tip of nose. The stop is moderate.

Muzzle, Tapers in a clean line from stop to nose, with the lower jaw strong but not prominent. The underline of the muzzle runs almost in a straight line from the corner of the lip to the corner of the jawbone, with depth at the stop being greater than at the nose. Hair on the muzzle is short and fine. Whiskers are not removed.

Nose, Tapers from bridge to tip with nostrils well open. Colour should blend with that of the coat or be black.

Lips, Fit fairly tightly forming a gentle curve in profile, with no heaviness in flews.

Eyes: Set well apart, almond shaped, medium sized. Colour, amber to brown. Expression is friendly, alert and intelligent. Flesh around the eyes should be the same colour as the lips.

Ears: Triangular; rounded at the tips, medium-sized and carried in a dropped fashion. They are set high and well back on the skull, with the base held very slightly erect so that the edge of the ear is carried to the side of the head. They are well feathered at and behind the fold, with short hair at the tips.

Mouth: The correct bite is tight scissors, full dentition is required. Overshot by more than 3 mm (1/8 inch), undershot and wry mouth are highly undesirable.

Jaws, Are strong enough to carry a sizeable bird, and softness in mouth is essential.

Neck: Slightly arched, strongly muscled and well set-on, of medium length, with no indication of throatiness.

Forequarters: Should be muscular, with the blade well laid back and well laid on, giving good withers sloping into the short back. The blade and upper arm are roughly equal in length with the upper arm well angled back under the body. Elbows should be close to the body, turning neither in nor out, working cleanly and evenly. The forelegs should appear as parallel columns, straight and strong in bone. The pasterns are strong and slightly sloping.

Body: Deep-chested with good spring of rib, brisket reaching to the elbow. The back is short and straight, the topline level, the loins strong and muscular.

The ribs are well-sprung, neither barrel-shaped nor flat. Tuck-up is moderate.

Hindquarters: Muscular, broad and square in appearance. Rear and front angulation should be in balance. Thighs are very muscular, upper and lower sections being moderately equal in length. Stifles are well bent and hocks well let down, turning neither in nor out. Dewclaws must not be present.

Feet: The strongly-webbed feet are tight and round with well arched toes, thick pads and strong nails, and are in proportion to the size of the dog. Dewclaws may be removed.

Tail: Following the natural, very slight slope of the croup, broad at the base, luxuriant and heavily feathered, with the last vertebra reaching at least to the hock joint. The tail may be carried below the level of the back except when the dog is alert when it curves high over, though not touching the back.

Gait/Movement: The Toller combines an impression of power with a springy, jaunty gait, showing good reach in front and a strong driving rear. Feet should turn neither in nor out and the legs travel in a straight line. As speed increases, the dog should single-track, topline remaining level, and covering ground with economy of movement.

Coat: The Toller was bred to retrieve from icy waters and must have a water-repellent, double coat of medium length and softness, with a softer, dense undercoat. The coat may have a slight wave on the back, but is otherwise straight. Some winter coats may form a long, loose curl at the throat.

Featherings are soft at the throat, behind the ears and at the back of the thighs, and forelegs are moderately feathered. While neatening of the ears and feet is permitted, the Toller should always appear natural.

Colour: Various shades of red or orange with lighter featherings and underside of tail, and usually at least one of the following white markings , tip of tail, feet (not exceeding beyond the pasterns), chest, and blaze.

A dog of otherwise high quality is not to be penalised for lack of white. The pigment of the nose, lips and eye rims should match, and be flesh-coloured blending with coat, or be black.

Sizes: Ideal height

for males over 18 months is 48-51 cms (19-20 ins);

for females over 18 months 45-48 cms (18-19 ins)

3 cms (1 ins) over or under ideal height is allowed.

Weight should be in proportion to the height and bone of the dog.

Guidelines: 20-23 kgs (45-51 lbs) for adult males

17-20 kgs (37-43 lbs) for adult bitches.

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog, and on the dog�s ability to perform its traditional work.

1. Dogs more than 3 cm (one inch) over or under ideal height.

2. Lack of substance in adult dog.

3. Dish or down-faced.

4. Abrupt stop.

5. Nose, eye rims and eyes not of prescribed colour.

6. Bright pink nose.

7. Large, round eyes.

8. Overshot bite.

9. Roached, sway back, slack loins.

10. Splayed or paper feet, down in pasterns.

11. Tail too short, kinked or curled over touching the back.

12. Tail carried below level of back when dog gaiting.

13. Open coat

DISQUALIFICATIONS

1. Undershot bite, wry mouth.

2. Overshot by more than 3 mm [1/8 inch]

3. Butterfly nose.

4. Lack of webbing.

5. Any colour other than red or orange shades.

6. White on shoulders, around ears, on back of neck, across back or flanks.

7. Silvery coat, grey in coat, black areas in coat.

8. In Adult classes, any shyness.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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Sayreovi   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Owner x 2 males, 1 entire 4 years old, 1 desexed who thinks he is still entire 6 years old, competitor and future breeder.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

The Toller was developed around the Little River area in Nova Scotia, Canada. Hence it's other name Little River Duck Dog. Bred as a versatile retriever, Tollers "tolled" (lured) ducks in closer to shore and gunshot range, once shot the Toller then procedes to retrieve the fallen bird. Only one other breed does this job, the Kooikerhondji which is speculated to have a similar history.

A mix of breeds went into the development though what breeds and what percentage is largely unknown, the common theory is Goldens, Irish Setters, Spaniels and some Collie.

3. How common is it in Australia?

Not very, while numerically still fairly small they are becoming quite well known especially in the dog sporting rings. There is a fair wait for a puppy due to the small amount of breeders and infrequent breeding.

4. What is the average lifespan?

12-14 years

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Active, driven, owner orientated, too damn intelligent for their own good. Prey driven, unless extensively socialised and raised with other animals then I wouldn't trust them with anything small and furry.

Most of the Tollers I know and have met are pretty reserved around strangers, not timid but more like they don't care about anyone outside 'their' family.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

At least an hour walk preferably with off lead running is about minimum, though they don't bounce off the walls if you miss a day or two as long as they are then mentally stimulated.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Depends on the lines and dog. My two are completely different, and Nova I would say no, Darcy yes. Nova is confident, cocky, dominant and has the "whats in it for me?" attitude. Darcy is calm, submissive, eager to please and just generally a really good and easy dog to own.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Well, they will occupy themselves but the result isn't exactly pleasant!

So no, they are very much a pack dog and require either human or canine company.

9. How much grooming is required?

Tollers have a thick double coated body of fur especially evident during winter, given the history of them being developed to retrieve in icy cold water.

A full brush out once a week during summer, winter months every 2-3 days. A quick brush when required for the easily matted areas. The only trimming required is the feet and around the ears.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

As a general rule I would say yes until they at least grow some brains. Young Tollers are full on and fairly over the top.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Tollers are a fairly hardy breed, I haven't had any problems with either of mine but given the small gene pool, things do crop up every now and again. Things to watch out for:

PRA

Hip dysplasia

Addisons Disease

Allergies

Immune related problems

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

All the above problems should be asked about and dogs should be clear of the last three.

Hip dysplasia - the lower the better obviously, Tollers aren't greatly affected by this so most scores will be fairly low. I think our maximum is a combined 12 score.

PRA - dogs should be genetically tested so they are either a clear, carrier or affected. Not many breeders do it and nor should they but if the breeding is carrier x carrier ALL puppies should then be DNA tested to find out it's status. Unless for breeding clear x carrier puppies don't need to be tested.

All Tollers should have their hearts checked for heart murmurs by a specialist.

Sorry about the shortness of answers I can't think tonight!

Edited by tollersowned

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kiesha09   
6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

At least an hour walk preferably with off lead running is about minimum, though they don't bounce off the walls if you miss a day or two as long as they are then mentally stimulated.

Just wondering about the exercise requirements. On the Dogzonline Breed Page they are listed as only 3 paws out of 5 which I would assume is moderate. Would you say they actually require more?

Does anyone else have anything to add? Its a breed I'm very interested in for the future so would be good to get some more information from current owners.

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Sayreovi   
6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

At least an hour walk preferably with off lead running is about minimum, though they don't bounce off the walls if you miss a day or two as long as they are then mentally stimulated.

Just wondering about the exercise requirements. On the Dogzonline Breed Page they are listed as only 3 paws out of 5 which I would assume is moderate. Would you say they actually require more?

The breed page needs to be changed a bit. Tollers are a very active breed and I personally wouldn't recommend any less for an adult dog. However if you could provide mental stimulation instead of physical exercise every so often, that shouldn't be a problem but it really does depend on the dog.

I have one boy that needs to be exhausted pretty much every day otherwise he is very vocal. Barks at the smallest things :thumbsup: My youngest boy though is a quiet boy and adjusts to the amount he is given, but would run all day if he could.

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6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

At least an hour walk preferably with off lead running is about minimum, though they don't bounce off the walls if you miss a day or two as long as they are then mentally stimulated.

Just wondering about the exercise requirements. On the Dogzonline Breed Page they are listed as only 3 paws out of 5 which I would assume is moderate. Would you say they actually require more?

The breed page needs to be changed a bit. Tollers are a very active breed and I personally wouldn't recommend any less for an adult dog. However if you could provide mental stimulation instead of physical exercise every so often, that shouldn't be a problem but it really does depend on the dog.

I have one boy that needs to be exhausted pretty much every day otherwise he is very vocal. Barks at the smallest things :grouphug: My youngest boy though is a quiet boy and adjusts to the amount he is given, but would run all day if he could.

Yeah, London is the same as your youngest. He doesn't have the scream and very quiet, but man when it's time to work or play he def has the drive. He's ok with an hour a day but he can easily work all day.

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I was just curious as to round about how much toller puppies cost? I'm still a student so not on a large income and would like to know how long I'll be saving...

Also wondering about those of you toller owners, how affectionate are your dogs?

Cheers

Edited by cpmonaghan

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Sayreovi   

You would be looking about $1000-$2000 for a Toller pup and a wait of 1-2 years.

They are pretty affectionate with their owners and people they like, my little girl gets so excited and happy to see me that she does the whole bum near face body wag and growls in excitement.

Two of mine will snob most people off so they can be pretty reserved (not shy, more like indifferent) with 'outsiders' and the other thinks everyone was put on this earth to say hello to him but they are definately affectionate.

Have you met many Tollers Cpmonaghan? I am also in Victoria so if you would like too meet some (or more!) I can let you know where I will be in the future :)

Edited by tollersowned

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No I've never met any! And whoever I have told that I want one has never heard of them. I'm moreso going off of what I have read on the internet, not so much the basic information but what owners of tollers have to say about them. I really want an affectionate dog that wants to be around me, sleep on my bed/sit with me on the couch. But also a very active one to maybe to go jogging with as I'm a very active person, I walk everywhere and love jogging and it'd be nice to have a companion some of the time! What are your thoughts?

Where abouts in Victoria are you from? I'm about 15 mins from Melbourne CBD and I have never seen one that I can remember, which I'm sure I would. I'm so jealous of your multiple tollers, where abouts did you get them all from?

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Sayreovi   

Sounds good, One of my boys would love doing that, he is very active and loves running but has an off switch at home and loves nothing more than sleeping on the couch next to you :) His daughter is very similar but is actually more affectionate than the boys!

I am south east, in Pakenham. I am going to an agility trial in Croydon on the 26th and will have all three with me and there will be Sharne from Skyesong with at least 2 Tollers as well. So if you are free pop down and say hello!

I got mine from 3 different breeders, my 9 year old boy Nova from Ximinez, 7 year old boy Darcy from Magpielane (no longer breeds Tollers) and Jovi who is 20 months and from Sherbrooke in South Australia.

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ooh, I'd actually really enjoy that. I'll see what I can do about attending.

Can I ask what made you decide on your first toller? And did you have competitive dogs before that?

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Sayreovi   

I wanted a medium, longish fur, intelligent, trainable dog with a natural build. My choices were Tollers, Aussies and BCs. I went with Tollers as I liked the look of them and I didn't want something as common as a BC :) I wanted a dog with a tail as well and as I wanted to show finding a show potential Aussie puppy with a tail nearly 10 years ago I had no chance.

Nope these guys are my first competition dogs, I got my first Toller when I was 14 I think :)

Edited by tollersowned

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I decided to get a toller about 10 years ago-we had one stay in a kennel I worked out for a few days and I kept hoping his owner wouldn't come back for him :laugh: 7 years later we got our Kodiak Bear from Ximimez.

My toller is a total snugglebunny who is at her happiest curled up in the arms of me or my husband. She is fairly indifferent towards everyone else and takes a while to warm to them. She's is surprisingly not the most energetic dog I've ever owned-last year I was on bedrest for quite a while and she didn't give a damn about missed walks, so long as she got her cuddles! She's a total piglet-around here she is known as the seagull, does get a little manic about food!

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Ptolomy   

I decided to get a toller about 10 years ago-we had one stay in a kennel I worked out for a few days and I kept hoping his owner wouldn't come back for him :laugh: 7 years later we got our Kodiak Bear from Ximimez.

My toller is a total snugglebunny who is at her happiest curled up in the arms of me or my husband. She is fairly indifferent towards everyone else and takes a while to warm to them. She's is surprisingly not the most energetic dog I've ever owned-last year I was on bedrest for quite a while and she didn't give a damn about missed walks, so long as she got her cuddles! She's a total piglet-around here she is known as the seagull, does get a little manic about food!

Puddleduck - can I ask how old you girl is please and who her mum and dad are :)

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Ohhhhh that's testing me ptolomy!!! Bear is 4 in June :eek: and she is from cozzie's (tollwest's Ximimez B C'Oz) first litter in Australia (she was mated in the US before Denise and Di imported her). Her sire is pinnokka beach bonfire.

If anyone knows the litter-she's the one with all the white :laugh:

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Sayreovi   

Ohhhhh that's testing me ptolomy!!! Bear is 4 in June :eek: and she is from cozzie's (tollwest's Ximimez B C'Oz) first litter in Australia (she was mated in the US before Denise and Di imported her). Her sire is pinnokka beach bonfire.

If anyone knows the litter-she's the one with all the white :laugh:

Glenmave posts on here occasionally and she owns Fly, who is a boy from that litter.

A girl from the same litter went to Skyesong, I haven't seen her post here recently though.

Would love to see some updated photos of her PD, if she is anything like her siblings but with white (I love white on them) then I am in love :p

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I'm a sucker for the white ones too...I saw a photo of her tubby little self at around 3 weeks I think and just screamed 'HER! MINE!' (awkward as i was at work at the time!) and thank god Di and Denise agreed!!!

I mainly post on here on my phone cos the girlchild monopolises my ability to go near a computer so I cant post anything very recent but there are shots from our 2009 and 2010 snow trips with the doggles here if you want to see her as an adult:

http://community.webshots.com/user/puddleducknsdtr

She hasn't changed much-possibly a bit rounder after my bedrest etc over the last 12 months :o And the cheeky bugger with the pointy ears is my Doofus :)

Di's daughter Nic has her brother Morgan and I know the lady who has her sister Shadow. And I got to meet them all when they were 6 weeks old and I convinced hubby that 'no, albury is absolutely on the way home to Sydney from thredbo!' (for the record it added 8 hours to the trip :laugh: ) It's been an amazing experience for me-she is my first purebred and the first one I've had since puppyhood. I've had dogs all my life but they've always come from the pound as adults. I love it when she does something and I can just look at her and say 'oh that is just SO toller of you!!' :laugh: she's also proven herself remarkably happy with apartment living (lucky cos we can't afford to move!!!)

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I knew nothing about the breed until my wife did a quiz that matched dogs to your life style. The Toller came up as one of five. After a bit of convincing from my wife I went out to Skyesong kennels near Ballarat to have a look at the Tollers and was very impressed.

I am a first time owner and have a bitch with call name “Riva” (Pronounced River) that I got from Denise Jacoby at Ximinez.

I can honestly say that we have not regretted getting a Toller.

Being a first time owner there is nothing more I can add that has not already been mentioned in relation to the other questions tabled

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Sayreovi   

Welcome River Toller, lovely to see more Toller owners on here. That name sounds familiar, were you at the dogs big day out at KCC last year?

There is a thread in the breed sub sections where alot of us usually post and check, please come and introduce yourself and of course pictures are mandatory :D

Here is the link :) http://www.dolforums.com.au/topic/28293-toller-time/page__st__6100

Edited by tollersowned

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