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Troy

Poodle (miniature)

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Troy   

Miniature Poodle

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=195 )

Group: Group 7 (Non Sporting)

General Appearance: The Poodle (Miniature) should be in every respect a replica, in miniature, of the Poodle (Standard). Height at shoulder should be under 38 cm (15 ins) but not under 28 cm (11 ins).

Tail: Docked: Set on rather high, carried at slight angle away from the body, never curled or carried over back, thick at root.

Undocked: Thick at root, set on rather high, carried away from the body and as straight as possible.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Long time owner (nearly 12 years), one time exhibitor and big fan. :laugh: I have dog sports titles on my dogs also.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Poodle origins are not clearly established. The best site on the history of all three poodle breeds is The Poodle History Project which catalogues the history of the breed from its use as a water retriever onwards. Curly coated water dogs appear to have been in use in quite a few European countries although Germany does appear to be commonly regarded as the Poodle's country of origin. From the larger water dog, smaller dogs were bred for companionship and as truffle dogs and circus dogs. It is generally believed that the Standard Poodle is the origin of the two other breeds and the Miniature was the second to be recognised. Various European countries claim credit for the development of colours with the blacks linked to Germany, the browns to Russia (where they remain a popular pet) and the whites to France. Most poodles, regardless of size, retain their love of water.

3. How common is it in Australia?

The Miniature Poodle is the least common of the three varieties with about 300 pups registered with the ANKC in 2008. The breed's popularity has been declining steadily since the mid 1980's when about 1,000 pups a year were registered.

4. What is the average lifespan?

About 12-15 years but older dogs are not uncommon.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

I regard the Mini Poodle as the most sensitive of the three sizes. They are intelligent, affectionate and lively. A well bred, well trained poodle is not hyperactive nor neurotic although timidity can be an issue in some lines. These dogs do very well at dog sports.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Mini Poodles will take as much exercise as you are willing to give them. They are athletic dogs capable of considerable endurance and most will walk the legs off their owners given half a chance. An underexercised Mini Poodle may well be a barker. They need stimulation - both mental and physical, to be at their best. This is not a lap dog although they will be on your lap whenever you sit down, given half a chance. :thumbsup: A good one hour walk a day is recommended.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Yes. Provided the owner is willing to put effort into grooming and training the dog, Mini Poodles make rewarding first pets for novices. My first dog was a Mini Poodle.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Provided the owner makes an effort to give the dog company and exercise when at home, then yes. This however, is not a dog that will thrive confined to a backyard, watching family life through a window. They are extremely people focussed.

9. How much grooming is required?

A dog in pet clip (eg. lamb trim) should be brushed a couple of times a week, bathed and groomed at least 6 weekly. They may not shed but lost hair is trapped in their coats and forms mats if not removed. Ears also require regular attention.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

No, a pup is probably at more risk from children than vice versa. They are a relatively light dog for their size (6-7kg average) so are too small to knock children around. They could however, be tripped over as they tend to stay very close to their people.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Yes. Progressive retinal atrophy is in the breed and a DNA test exists to test for the most common type. Any responsible breeder will test their breeding dogs for this. Epilepsy and slipping patellas are not unknown in the breed. The breed can be prone to spinal disc issues but this is not common.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

For a pet puppy (indeed any puppy) DNA test results for PRA should be asked about. There are other threads here about that but any mating that has the possiblity of producing affected pups should be avoided unless every pup is tested. A "C' result will be an affected pup that will go blind.

Temperament of the parents is important. Avoid dogs that display timidity. A poodle pup should be inquisitive and friendly.

A responsible breeder will put effort into ensuring that only quality dogs are bred from. Avoid any breeder that advertises pups as "rare" colours or markings. If possible visit the breeder but if not, a recommendation from a happy pet owner is always a good start.

Edited by poodlefan

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espinay2   

No other questions here so I will ask one. I must admit that the toy is my favourite size of the poodles (odd coming from a giant breed person :D ).

I was surprised at the small number of dogs you quoted as being bred. What factors have led to this, and what influences people to choose the larger sizes over the toy?

One more question - has anyone ever chorded a toy poodle coat :laugh:

Edited by espinay2

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No other questions here so I will ask one. I must admit that the toy is my favourite size of the poodles (odd coming from a giant breed person :rofl: ).

I was surprised at the small number of dogs you quoted as being bred. What factors have led to this, and what influences people to choose the larger sizes over the toy?

One more question - has anyone ever chorded a toy poodle coat :rofl:

Toys are far and away the most popular size Tracey - by a factor of about 4 times the other sizes. Its minis that have the low numbers.

I have a photo somewhere of a corded Toy. Its possible to do it with a correct coat but I've no idea why you'd want to - its a heap of work to maintain. :rofl:

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espinay2   

Oops! I should not try to write stuff in a hurry - I did mean Mini :rofl: - OK then, why is it that Minis are less popular?

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Why minis are less popluar is a mystery to me, too.

My first dogs as a kid was a mini.

Had a mini for 8 years- he's oversized (pet only, so no problem) and very easy size to handle- curls up and fits easily on a lounge cushion.

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Oops! I should not try to write stuff in a hurry - I did mean Mini :rofl: - OK then, why is it that Minis are less popular?

I honestly have no idea. :rofl:

I suppose a very small poodle has a lot of charm for many people but personally I think the slightly larger minis are a better all round family pet. Maybe people don't realise there is a middle sized one? :rofl:

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espinay2   

They do seem the better 'family sized' dog (more robust than a toy but still small enough for those wanting the smaller size) - I believe that under FCI there are four sizes? Why only 3 here?

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They do seem the better 'family sized' dog (more robust than a toy but still small enough for those wanting the smaller size) - I believe that under FCI there are four sizes? Why only 3 here?

I think we follow the English system of categorizing them.

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quoll   

Love the post Poodlefan, very thorough and well described. And the badger :laugh::o:o , just love them and otters and hedgehogs.

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Lady H   

Hi there miniature poodle ppl!

we are currently looking for a puppy and the mini poodle is high on our list of breeds, I was just hoping you may be able to help with a few queries...

I am familiar with this breed, my grandmother has always had them, however I was a little turned off by the temperament of her last poodle. He was very aggressive and highly strung in that if you were doing something he didn't like he would growl/attack at you! He was also very protective of her, in the same manner. No one in our entire extended family liked this dog and he has turned everyone off the breed.

I am wondering what the Miniature Poodle temperament traits generally are, my grandmother I beleive was the cause of her dogs behaviour. My mother has told me that growing up with poodles, whichever was closest to my GM was always like this, the others would be playful fun loving dogs... I have grown up with German Shorthaired Pointers who's personality I LOVE however this is not a suitable breed for our situation. (my parents still have one who I consider mine too so hopefully best of both worlds!)

Our situation is no children, I work from home and only part time, hubby (to be) has quite bad asthma, we do want a no-low shedding dog (don't want fur through the house either), I want a dog who can join me on regular walks/jogs (and hopefully whereever else I go!!)... I am also fine with regular grooming.

Also, love the size of the miniature poodle - not too big, not too small...

I (and especially my partner) are not fond of the poodle show cuts and would prefer to let ours be shaggy if we do decide on this breed...

I am also curious as to the price I could expect to pay.

Thank you so much! I just can't wait to get a pup there is nothing I want more right now! :rofl:

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Hi,

Thanks for the great information in this thread. :heart:

I have a couple of other question for any owners/breeders/enthusiasts.

The grooming - is it relatively easy to learn how to do this properly as long as you have the desire and commitment to do so? I would use a groomer regularly, even if it was just to get the dog used to the groomers and attend every now and again, but I would love to be able to do it myself. Other than the six weekly big groom, maintenance seems relatively minimal, which surprised me to be honest.

Is there any special puppy coat care?

I know it has been mentioned to avoid breeders who advertise 'rare' colours. Are there any colours (and I am sure it is due to lines, rather than colour itself) that a prospective buyer should be extra careful about in terms of health and temperament. Personally I am a fan of the blacks and the whites.

PF, you were saying that there aren't as many miniatures as there are other poodle sizes. Would you consider them in high demand and hard to find? If I were to get a miniature poodle I would be looking at a puppy or a young mature dog as I want to participate in dog sports. Do you often come across young mature dogs in this breed?

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Emm:

The grooming - is it relatively easy to learn how to do this properly as long as you have the desire and commitment to do so? I would use a groomer regularly, even if it was just to get the dog used to the groomers and attend every now and again, but I would love to be able to do it myself. Other than the six weekly big groom, maintenance seems relatively minimal, which surprised me to be honest.

Emm, if I can do it, anyone can. You've identified the key ingredients.. motivation. The other is practice. Get a couple of lessons, buy Shirley Kalstones book and away you go. I'd recommend you have your puppy done by a professional as it sets up a good routine with someone who can be quick on a wriggly pup. But go ahead and buy all the gear and you can at least be bathing and drying (that takes time to do well) in between visits.

Is there any special puppy coat care?

No.

I know it has been mentioned to avoid breeders who advertise 'rare' colours. Are there any colours (and I am sure it is due to lines, rather than colour itself) that a prospective buyer should be extra careful about in terms of health and temperament. Personally I am a fan of the blacks and the whites.

Black is the most common colour, followed by brown. Silvers and whites are less common in the mini and apricot and red the least common. Personally I'd recommend you find a breeder you like and take whatever comes. I like the blacks myself - far less work than a white, that's for sure.

PF, you were saying that there aren't as many miniatures as there are other poodle sizes. Would you consider them in high demand and hard to find? If I were to get a miniature poodle I would be looking at a puppy or a young mature dog as I want to participate in dog sports. Do you often come across young mature dogs in this breed?

Not, not particularly high demand - just far less popular than the toys - check the numbers of breeders and litters listed here as an example of that. However, finding a good breeder may take a bit of effort, depending on where you live. I think the minis make a better family dog than the toys as they are more robust physically but toys are tough little critters.

Sometimes breeders will run a pup on that doesn't develop into a dog they want to show. These are usually sold on as older pups to homes. Personally, if you are wanting a pup for dog sports, I'd suggest you get a baby puppy and do all the raising and socialising yourself. Those early weeks really matter in terms of the level of focus and confidence you'll get in an older dog.

Edited by poodlefan

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LadyH:

I am familiar with this breed, my grandmother has always had them, however I was a little turned off by the temperament of her last poodle. He was very aggressive and highly strung in that if you were doing something he didn't like he would growl/attack at you! He was also very protective of her, in the same manner. No one in our entire extended family liked this dog and he has turned everyone off the breed.

Any dog is a product of its genes, its environment and its training. On the genes/temperament side, if you are asking whether some poodles can be dominant or aggressive or highly strung, then the answer is yes.

On the environment/training side did your Grandmother's poodle think he was the boss of her household - it sure sounds like it. Poodles are smart dogs. They need boundaries. Fail to give them and some can become little monsters.

Careful selection AND raising of a pup is so important. But that goes for any breed.

If your family knew nice poodles, its a pity that one nasty one has soured them for the breed. You'll find good and poor examples in EVERY breed though.

Edited by poodlefan

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Thank you PF. :hug:

So you would say that there are little differences between the colours. It is more the case of finding a good breeder. :hug:

I have no deep-seated preference for colour, there is just something extra eye-catching about the blacks, and the whites. I can understand why a black dog would less work than a white!

I had a look at the DOL breed pages, and I see what you mean regarding numbers. Toys are the most popular by far, but the miniatures are certainly there.

That is heartening about the grooming. I am all thumbs but when I put my mind to learning something new, I will do it. I will check out that author you mentioned.

I think my main concern is finding a good breeder, like you said.

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Thank you PF. :hug:

So you would say that there are little differences between the colours. It is more the case of finding a good breeder. :hug:

I have no deep-seated preference for colour, there is just something extra eye-catching about the blacks, and the whites. I can understand why a black dog would less work than a white!

I had a look at the DOL breed pages, and I see what you mean regarding numbers. Toys are the most popular by far, but the miniatures are certainly there.

That is heartening about the grooming. I am all thumbs but when I put my mind to learning something new, I will do it. I will check out that author you mentioned.

I think my main concern is finding a good breeder, like you said.

Your pup may have to wear a paper bag on its head after the first few 'home grooms' but the good thing about hair is that mistakes grow out.

Where are you? There are good breeders in all States and some breeders have a record of producing good sports dogs. :)

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Your pup may have to wear a paper bag on its head after the first few 'home grooms' but the good thing about hair is that mistakes grow out.

:hug: Yep, that'll be my poor mite.

I'm in Qld.

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Your pup may have to wear a paper bag on its head after the first few 'home grooms' but the good thing about hair is that mistakes grow out.

:hug: Yep, that'll be my poor mite.

I'm in Qld.

I don't know anyone in minis up there. :hug: Perhaps you could ask in the poodle thread for recommendations for a breeder for a dog sports dog. In NSW, I'd be talking to Elire.

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Your pup may have to wear a paper bag on its head after the first few 'home grooms' but the good thing about hair is that mistakes grow out.

:hug: Yep, that'll be my poor mite.

I'm in Qld.

I don't know anyone in minis up there. :hug: Perhaps you could ask in the poodle thread for recommendations for a breeder for a dog sports dog. In NSW, I'd be talking to Elire.

Thanks PF, I will ask in the poodle thread. :)

Although I'd prefer as close as possible, I'd certainly not rule out interstate breeders.

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Thanks PF, I will ask in the poodle thread. :hug:

Although I'd prefer as close as possible, I'd certainly not rule out interstate breeders.

Its always great if you can go and see the pups and meet the breeder in person. That said, two of my dogs came from interstate.

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