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Boxer

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Humbolt   

I am in Qld.

Thank you for your kind words and advice.

I am sure no matter what we do we will have a wonderful pup!

We will raise her like she should be, whoever she may be :laugh:

I will let you know how we go.

Thanks again!

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Jed   
I am in Qld.

Thank you for your kind words and advice.

I am sure no matter what we do we will have a wonderful pup!

We will raise her like she should be, whoever she may be :thumbsup:

I will let you know how we go.

Thanks again!

Yep, keep us in the loop. There aren't too many reg boxer pups in Qld at the moment.

Remember to find out what she has been eating, so you can continue with that diet to avoid tummy upsets. Remember not to razz her as a baby,do the training first. Sit, No, and don't let her get too excited. That nice little pup will soon be a humongous teenager, and if you haven't built in an off button, she will be a pain in the neck. Really important not to stir boxer pups up all the time Teach her to sit or lie down, and give her a lot of quiet stroking, so she understands "quiet is good".

I have a 19 month old loony here who runs in circles around me when she is happy, jumping as high as my head, and spinning. No probs, but I had a friend here the other day, who nearly had a heart attack "that dog will knock you over". She wont, she was kept quietish as a babe, and knows what "no" means. We both enjoy a bit of nonsense, but if you don't make your pup understand that "looney" is not a way of life, she will be out of control. They behave exactly as you let them and if you laugh and are happy when a baby puppy is nutso, it will be hard to stop when she is older. They are a very active agile enthusiastic breed, and with children, it is important that they have manners, or they will knock the kids over. You need to teach them what quiet means! So make sure there are plenty of quiet times, and lots of affection. And they should be inside, and you don't want them breaking anything in the house.

Great breed with children. They are devoted to their family. My chidren grew up with a few, and there were never any problems.

But a lot are dumped because they are over the top and out of control at 12 - 18 months, so early training and not too much stirring up is very important.

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Melbomb, I saw the questions, and kept meaning to get back to them, and thought what a great job Nala Cleo had done, but I see what you mean about a few opinions.

I reckon stonebridge should answer them. How about it, stonebridge? Anyone who has obedienced a boxer is a hero (but only if it passed ;) One of mine got couple of big fat 0, the judge just didn't understand boxers :D )

Hell no I didnt compete in any obedience classes. I was only 11 or 12 at the time.

I trained Carlos myself(the big goof ball he was).

He could heel on lead, off lead, sit, down, stay, retrieve. Didnt like the dumbell though. Climb obstacles.

I then taught him hand comands.

He was a bloody intelligent dog. We would walk to the shops. A good few kms return trip. He would hold the paper all the way back. I could even give him my bag of lollies LOL to hold and apart from the bag being wet he wouldnt even attempt to munch them.

Didnt trial him though.

Gosh that was a long time ago. Brings back lots of memories.

Have never obedience trained any other dog. It was a one off with him but I thoroughly enjoyed it even though I was very young.

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Jed   

Sounds as if you had fun, stonebridge.

A very intelligent breed, with excellent reasoning powers, although sometimes they would like us to think otherwise!

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What are the main physical differences between German, English, Dutch and American type boxers?

Also do the different type boxers have different type personalities ( more confidence in some, faster to mature in others etc) not taking into account the individual natures of dogs but as a group.

Edited by GeckoTree

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NalaCleo   
What are the main physical differences between German, English, Dutch and American type boxers?

Also do the different type boxers have different type personalities ( more confidence in some, faster to mature in others etc) not taking into account the individual natures of dogs but as a group.

I have found European lines to be generally "taller" than the American lines

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Jed   

I think the dogs are different, as different lines are different - all should come within the standard. So the temperment and personalities would vary within lines as much as within countries. But the dogs from different countries have different attributes.

I think Dutch ones might be generally a bit heavier in bone - but that is just the ones I've seen. Most American lines mature later than English.

I have a video link somewhere for the boxer judging at Westminster (USA) which may interest you. Ditto one on UK judging. See if I can find them, and if I do, will post them here for you.

I personally haven't seen enough from each country to really be able to accurately answer. Most of the boxers in Aus are mainly English lines, although there are some American lines, and some German and Dutch imports.We based much of our breeding, from early days on our UK imports, Panfield, Witherford, Winawuk, Gremlin, and some USA, Dutch and German imports, although fewer of them than the UK dogs.

Breeders in Aust have found that crossing the lines from various countries has, over the years, produced some very good dogs.

This site has some comparisons of dogs from various countries, with photos.

http://www.worldwideboxer.com/style.html

Sjecoin is an Australian kennel with mostly American dogs

www.sjecoin.com

Miles and Liz Gunter have imported dogs from several countries - Italy, Canada, and there are pictures of them on their website.

http://www.guntopboxers.com/

Hope this helps :laugh:

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What are the main physical differences between German, English, Dutch and American type boxers?

Also do the different type boxers have different type personalities ( more confidence in some, faster to mature in others etc) not taking into account the individual natures of dogs but as a group.

Here is an excellent site that shows many comparisons

www.worldwideboxer.com/

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According to my Boxer books, the original Boxers were in fact mainly white with patches of colour. They are just as good as their more coloured litter mates. They aren't albinos as they do have pigmentation, but like any white dog care needs to be taken with regard to sunburn etc. They are not prone to more cancers or health issues than the coloured Boxers and they make just as good a pet.

One of my Boxer books had an interesting section on why the white Boxer were not allowed in the accepted colours in the stud book. It stems back to the 2nd World War when they were used by the German army to carry messages along the trenches. Due to the bright colouration they were easily seen by snipers and taken out, thus the messages didn't get through. Then the army said they wanted mainly solid brindle or red as they were camoflaged so the white and white markings even, became undesirable. After the war when dog shows became popular again, white/flashy markings were desired but to get the white they needed to use dogs that carried the white gene. So if you breed flashy to flashy then you will get the white puppies in the litter usually.

You see alot more whites for sale now which is great I think. I think putting an animal down because it isn't a desirable colour for the show ring is wrong, but thats just my humble opinion and I couldn't do it, but then I'm a softy :rofl: My white Boxer puppies were often the ones that found homes before the coloured pups and I know of whites that were still enjoying life at 12 years of age. :eek:

Hope that helps mumsy :)

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mumsy   

Thanks everyone, my 10 week old white boy is coming home tomorrow. Can't wait!!

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Jed   

Congratulations. I hope you will post in the Boxer sub forum about him - with photos, of course :)

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White Boxers are more genetically predisposed to deafness. Which is a big reason breeders today would not want to use them for breeding even if they could be registered.

Some backyard breeders think it's great to breed a white Boxer with a white. This just increases the risk.

White colouring in Boxers originated from a dog called Tom, a British Bulldog of old type and similar to a Boxer, not the heavy fellows people know today.

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Are Boxers a drooling breed?

edit sp.

Not usually, althought if it is hot and they've had a drink they can be wet around the mouth. Some lines also are more "wet" ie more loose skin around the mouth and these tend to be a bit more slobbery (if thats a word lol) but over all, they aren't drooly.

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Deafness is something to check for with whites but it isn't just a white Boxer problem, as other breeds also can be affected.

Whites can not be put on the Main registration, but if they are in the litter they have to be put on the Limited register. To reduce the possibility of having whites, then breeding a solid Boxer to a Flashy is the way to go. It is common for a white to be born in most litters, but many breeders used to cull them, but this is now changing and many breeders place them in pet homes, where they have very happy and long lives, just like their coloured litter mates.

Hope that helps :rofl:

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Tiara   
Are Boxers a drooling breed?

edit sp.

Not usually, althought if it is hot and they've had a drink they can be wet around the mouth. Some lines also are more "wet" ie more loose skin around the mouth and these tend to be a bit more slobbery (if thats a word lol) but over all, they aren't drooly.

Cool, thanks :eek:

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Jed   
Deafness is something to check for with whites but it isn't just a white Boxer problem, as other breeds also can be affected.

Whites can not be put on the Main registration, but if they are in the litter they have to be put on the Limited register. To reduce the possibility of having whites, then breeding a solid Boxer to a Flashy is the way to go. It is common for a white to be born in most litters, but many breeders used to cull them, but this is now changing and many breeders place them in pet homes, where they have very happy and long lives, just like their coloured litter mates.

Hope that helps :rofl:

Be aware that each state Canine Control (the registering body) has different regulations. In some states, white boxers may not be registered at all, so depending on where your white boxer came from, it may or may not be registered.

My experience is that white pups are not produced in all litters - some litters have white pups, some not. It depends on the genetics of the parents, and to some extent, how flashy the parents are.

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MsKatie   

My brother is getting a white boxer puppy from a kennel in NZ because they can still dock tails there - is this soemthing Australian breeders have noticed happening?

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