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Troy

Welsh Corgi ( Cardigan)

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Troy   

The Welsh Corgi (Cardigan)

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=154 )

Group: Group 5 (Working Dogs)

General Appearance: Sturdy, tough, mobile, capable of endurance. Long in proportion to height, terminating in fox-like brush, set in line with body.

Characteristics: Alert, active and intelligent.

Temperament: Alert, intelligent, steady, not shy or aggressive.

Head And Skull: Head foxy in shape and appearance, skull wide and flat between ears tapering towards eyes above which it is slightly domed. Moderate stop. Length of foreface in proportion to head 3 to 5, muzzle tapering moderately towards nose which projects slightly and in no sense blunt. Underjaw clean cut. Strong but without prominence. Nose black.

Eyes: Medium size, clear, giving kindly, alert but watchful expression. Rather widely set with corners clearly defined. Preferably dark, or to blend with coat, rims dark. One or both eyes pale blue, blue or blue flecked, permissible only in blue merles.

Ears: Erect, proportionately rather large to size of dog. Tips slightly rounded, moderately wide at base and set about 9 cms (3 &1/2; ins) apart. Carried so that tips are slightly wide of straight line drawn from tip of nose through centre of eyes, and set well back so that they can be laid flat along neck.

Mouth: Teeth strong, with scissor bite, i.e. Upper teeth closely overlapping the lower teeth and set square to the jaws.

Neck: Muscular, well developed, in proportion to dog's build, fitting into well sloping shoulders.

Forequarters: Shoulders well laid, angulated at approximately 90 degrees to upper arm; muscular, elbows close to sides. Strong bone carried down to feet. Legs short but body well clear of the ground, forearms slightly bowed to mould round the chest. Feet turned slightly outwards.

Body: Chest moderately broad with prominent breast bone. Body fairly long and strong, with deep brisket, well sprung ribs, clearly defined waist. Topline level.

Hindquarters: Strong, well angulated and aligned with muscular thighs and second thighs, strong bone carried down to feet, legs short; when standing, hocks vertical, viewed from side and rear.

Feet: Round, tight, rather large and well padded. All dewclaws to be removed.

Tail: Like a fox's brush set in line with the body and moderately long (to touch or nearly touch ground). Carried low when standing but may be lifted a little above body when moving, not curled over back.

Gait/Movement: Free and active, elbows fitting close to sides, neither loose nor tied. Forelegs reaching well forward without too much lift, in unison with thrusting action of hindlegs.

Coat: Short or medium of hard texture. Weatherproof, with good undercoat. Preferably straight.

Colour: Any colour, with or without white markings, but white should not predominate.

Sizes: Ideal Height: 30 cms (12 ins) at shoulders.

Weight in proportion to size with overall balance the prime consideration.

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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Peter13   

1. What is my relationship with the breed?

Owner of two Cardigans - 14 years

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Corgis were used as cattle drivers, vermin hunters and farm guards. They drove cattle by barking and nipping at the cattle's heels rather than just herding them. The dog's low stature helped him role out of the way of kicking cows

3. How common is it in Australia?

Not so common

4. What is the average lifespan?

12-15 years

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

I've had two Corgis for 14 years, and both have different personalities. One (Jessie) loves to get out, go for walks and explore. The other (James) is lazy and will do anything to get out of going for a walk. Both are great with kids and will take any kind of torment. They do like to bark whenever someone walks near the house, which can be a good or bad thing, as James doesn't like to stop barking until they are well out of sight. James, the lazy one, loves to come inside and cuddle up, while Jessie has only just started to like this as she gets on in her years.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Jessie could go for walks all day if you let her, while James tries to get out of going for walks. I would suggest a 15-30min walk in adult years in order to keep their weight down. I know that Jess would struggle with her weight and would probably have caused a bit of trouble if she got bored. This is one reason why we bought two dogs at once, so they can keep each other company and run around together in the backyard.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I think so. They are easy to look after.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Again it depends on the dog. James could easily lie down all day, yet Jessie would go crazy and destroy things. Give them plenty of toys and things to keep them occupied. Or buy two, it may be a tiny bit more expensive, but it is well worth it. And we didn't need to train James (purchased a year after Jess) as he learnt from Jessie.

9. How much grooming is required?

A quick 10min brush each week would be good, otherwise their hair gets into clumps and knots and takes hours to brush them if it gets out of hand.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Jessie was only basics trained, but I think their temperament allows for anything a child can dish out. In saying that, adult supervision should always be present, not only for the childs safety but also the dog.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Can gain weight easily. No other problems that I'm aware of.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Unsure, sorry.

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mita   

What is/was my relationship with the breed?

My family owned a pet Cardigan Corgi, named Biddy, when we were children. She was a wonderful, adaptable family dog. Equally happy in the house following my mother around, or in the garden playing very sensibly with the children, or out on my father's boat in Moreton Bay. She was so intelligent that she'd figure out what activity was now on, & would change her behaviour accordingly.

Like, every morning she'd check what my father was wearing. If he was in his clothes for work, Biddy would ignore him & go off to become my mother's house shadow for the day. But if he has wearing clothes for going out on his boat, Biddy would streak down to his car and sit there waiting to go, too. She was quite famous out on the bay, with charter boat skippers yelling, 'Gidday, Biddy!' as they went by.

My father couldn't even say the words 'boat' or 'fishing' on the phone, the night before. Otherwise, Biddy would go down to his car and sit waiting all night. He used to spell the words.... But, after a while, Biddy started to cotton on to that, too.

Biddy taught me that Cardigan Corgis are a perfect family dog.

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