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Stem Cell Research

#1 User is offline   sterlingsilver 

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Posted 27 September 2011 - 11:22 PM

I have heard a lot about stem cell research in dogs and thought it was the next big thing, but recently I have been told it may not be.
Has anyone has any success with this procedure?
How expensive were the treatments?

#2 User is offline   Dju 

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 12:33 AM

More information? Treatments for what, exactly? :) Stem cell research can be applied to plenty different things. Like they're doing stem cell research at the moment to try and actually regrow skin for burn victims and I heard they just recently succeeded with regrowing a dog's pads that had been completely burnt off.

#3 User is offline   Staranais 

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 06:15 AM

Do you mean for hip dysplasia? Costs about $2500 last time I looked into it, and they haven't yet done clinic trials proving that it actually works. Can't wait for them to actually do proper robust studies on it - I hope they do.

I might take a chance on it if I owned a seriously arthritic dog and some spare cash, but couldn't recommend it yet to anyone else.

#4 User is offline   abgail 

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 11:45 AM

Went to a information night ran by a clinic in Lilydale (VIC) about 3 weeks ago. They are doing stem cell therapy on dogs,cats and horses with arthritis, hip dysplasia and other ligaments/tendon problems. They said the results so far were extremely positive and had two dogs at the night that had the procedure. I've got my lab booked in for the stem cell next month.

#5 User is offline   aussielover 

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 12:00 PM

View PostStaranais, on 28 September 2011 - 06:15 AM, said:

Do you mean for hip dysplasia? Costs about $2500 last time I looked into it, and they haven't yet done clinic trials proving that it actually works. Can't wait for them to actually do proper robust studies on it - I hope they do.

I might take a chance on it if I owned a seriously arthritic dog and some spare cash, but couldn't recommend it yet to anyone else.

+1

Totally agree with everything said.

#6 User is offline   sterlingsilver 

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 12:38 PM

I meant in general, treatment for any condition.
I heard there had been trials, but no positive outcomes.
I know of a couple vets that have taken it on board and are treating clients pets, but havent heard of anyone....yet...that had thought the cost worthwhile.
The latest I heard from another vet is that it had not proved successful overall, and there were not enough positive outcomes to say it works.

This post has been edited by sterlingsilver: 28 September 2011 - 12:39 PM


#7 Guest_Black Obsession_*

Posted 28 September 2011 - 12:50 PM

That wildlife guy who had a show on the ABC has a Newfoundland who had stem cells injected into her knee joints. She was suffering from very bad Arthritis (she may have had a Cruciate Ligament problem but they didn't say).

They never showed a follow up to her surgery so I have no idea if it was successful. I stopped watching it because I was only interested in the Newfoundland and I thought the guy was a bit of a wanker.

ETA

The show was called "Chris Humfrey's Wild Life".

This post has been edited by dogcentric: 07 October 2011 - 09:11 AM


#8 User is offline   AmandaJ 

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 04:47 PM

We had a seminar on it at SACA a few months ago. You should be able to get a copy of the DVD if you call Noahs Crossing Vet Clinic. Much cheaper alternative to a hip replacement and a successful trial has been done.

#9 User is offline   JackieW 

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 03:18 PM

A friend has just had the treatment for her dog. I mentioned this thread and she said I could pass this on - one of their vet nurses has a 4 y.o. dog (not sure what breed) that couldn't walk 400m without needing to be carried back home, couldn't climb stairs, in/out of car etc., with bad HD. They did the stem cell treatment and now do can go 4km+, in/out of car, completely normal range of movement. Also she's happy for me to pass on her email to sterlingsilver if you'd like to discuss it all with her (she's got copies of studies too) - contact me by PM if you'd like it.

#10 User is offline   Inevitablue 

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 03:36 PM

I was previously working with stem cells, assisting vets with harvesting fat, and processing in the laboratory. I have now moved on to the most scientifically advanced stem cells.



A brief overview of whats available now, but I will write up some more info if people are interested.

I now work for Monash Uni, and we have Allogeneic stem cells available. These are pure stem cells, taken from a donor and grown in culture in the laboratory. The benefits over the old method of harvesting fat are-

No need to cut and scar your dog
No need for full anesthesias
Pure mesenchymal stem cells, not stromal vascular fraction (which is what is isolated when taking your own dogs fat, which has some stem cells)
The original fat is donated by a fully health tested dog under the age of 12months. The cells are younger and work more effectively. An old dog has old stem cells.
and lastly the price is much more affordable, for example a dog under 20kg getting 2 hips treated will be around $1000 to the owner.

Have a look at our website

www.australianstemcells.com.au

Feel free to ask any questions.

If anyone is curious about this in the human world, look around on this website www.mesoblast.com

#11 User is offline   dogbesotted 

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 03:59 PM

a good friend has just had this therapy done for her two yo bitch.. we arehopeful that the outcome will result in a better and hasppier life for her dog..
she is very young and had previously has surgery for fragmented coronoid process.. nasty nasty.

H

#12 User is offline   sterlingsilver 

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 07:38 PM

View PostInevitablue, on 01 October 2011 - 03:36 PM, said:

I was previously working with stem cells, assisting vets with harvesting fat, and processing in the laboratory. I have now moved on to the most scientifically advanced stem cells.



A brief overview of whats available now, but I will write up some more info if people are interested.

I now work for Monash Uni, and we have Allogeneic stem cells available. These are pure stem cells, taken from a donor and grown in culture in the laboratory. The benefits over the old method of harvesting fat are-

No need to cut and scar your dog
No need for full anesthesias
Pure mesenchymal stem cells, not stromal vascular fraction (which is what is isolated when taking your own dogs fat, which has some stem cells)
The original fat is donated by a fully health tested dog under the age of 12months. The cells are younger and work more effectively. An old dog has old stem cells.
and lastly the price is much more affordable, for example a dog under 20kg getting 2 hips treated will be around $1000 to the owner.

Have a look at our website

www.australianstemcells.com.au

Feel free to ask any questions.

If anyone is curious about this in the human world, look around on this website www.mesoblast.com

Thankyou for this info.
Has there been a lot of success with the treatment? With long term benefit?
Where do vets get the donor cells from?Whose dogs do they use for this?

#13 User is offline   Inevitablue 

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 09:22 PM

Monash Uni have a vet who looks out for when a suitable dog comes in for a spey, the owners are offered to have the spey done for free if they allow about 1/3 specimen jar of fat to be removed.

One donation of fat grows enough cells for, on average, 2000 single doses. A single dose is equivalent to one joint being treated.

Two vets have been trialling, one in NSW and one in Victoria. More so to see what dosages (ie number of cells) work for each size dog etc.

We are partnered with Vet Stem in the US, they have completed the most trials.

The difficult thing has been that stem cells have always been borne from universities and scientific research. So the money hasn't been there to pour into trials. Unlike pharmaceutical companies where satisfying the consumer, and generating sales, is the main goal. Still, trials are very important no doubt.

Here is one of our partner's trials http://www.vet-stem....0-%20Canine.pdf

That is for autogolous treatment however, as allogeneic is the more recent development.

We can still culture your own dogs cells too. So if the thought of an allogeneic transplant is not something you want, we can take you own dogs fat, and expand it in culture. Thus returning many millions of mesenchymal stem cells into each joint, and cryofreezing the rest.

Some of our scientists are working with renal specialists to work towards repairing damaged kidneys, and our two trial vets are getting promising results from the first few congestive heart failure treatments done.

#14 User is offline   BigDaz 

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 10:37 PM

I have been told the benefits for stem cell therapy for something such as arthrits are only seen for 6 months, then the dog reverts to the way it was prior to stem cell therapy, is this true?

#15 User is offline   sandgrubber 

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Posted 02 October 2011 - 05:12 AM

Curious . . . I'd think they'd be using foetal stem cells for allogenic . . . you wouldn't have right to life opposition to using foetal tissue from bitches speyed while preggers.
Good to hear this is working and that tissue acquisition is reasonably simple.

View PostInevitablue, on 01 October 2011 - 09:22 PM, said:

Monash Uni have a vet who looks out for when a suitable dog comes in for a spey, the owners are offered to have the spey done for free if they allow about 1/3 specimen jar of fat to be removed.

One donation of fat grows enough cells for, on average, 2000 single doses. A single dose is equivalent to one joint being treated.

Two vets have been trialling, one in NSW and one in Victoria. More so to see what dosages (ie number of cells) work for each size dog etc.

We are partnered with Vet Stem in the US, they have completed the most trials.

The difficult thing has been that stem cells have always been borne from universities and scientific research. So the money hasn't been there to pour into trials. Unlike pharmaceutical companies where satisfying the consumer, and generating sales, is the main goal. Still, trials are very important no doubt.

Here is one of our partner's trials http://www.vet-stem....0-%20Canine.pdf

That is for autogolous treatment however, as allogeneic is the more recent development.

We can still culture your own dogs cells too. So if the thought of an allogeneic transplant is not something you want, we can take you own dogs fat, and expand it in culture. Thus returning many millions of mesenchymal stem cells into each joint, and cryofreezing the rest.

Some of our scientists are working with renal specialists to work towards repairing damaged kidneys, and our two trial vets are getting promising results from the first few congestive heart failure treatments done.


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