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Basset Fauve De Bretagne

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Troy   

The Basset Fauve De Bretagne

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=105 )

Group: Group 4 (Hounds)

History: This little basset has the same qualities as the breed from which it is derived, the Griffon Fauve de Bretagne. Very popular in its region of origin in the nineteenth century, it earned a national reputation in the course of the last 30 years of the twentieth century.

Its exceptional aptitude for hunting has allowed it to win the French Cup hunting trophy on rabbit a number of times and it has become very popular.

General Appearance: The Basset Fauve de Bretagne, is a small, stocky hound, lively, rapid for its size. It benefits from enormous energy coupled with excellent hardiness.

Characteristics: He is a scent hound used for hunting rabbit, hare, fox, roe deer and wild boar.

Temperament: The Basset Fauve de Bretagne are impassioned hunters but are also excellent companions of man, sociable, affectionate and equable. They adapt themselves easily to all terrains, even the most difficult, and to all quarry. When hunting they reveal themselves to be courageous, wily, and obstinate, which makes them very successful.

Head And Skull: Skull: Rather long with marked occipital protuberance. Seen from the front, the cranium has the form of a flattened arch and diminishes in width from the rear to the superciliary arches, which are not very prominent.

Stop: A little more marked than with the Griffon Fauve de Bretange.

Nose: Black or dark brown. Well open nostrils.

Muzzle: Slightly tapering rather than being perfectly rectangular.

Lips: Covering well the lower jaw but without excess. Moustaches only slightly furnished.

Eyes: Neither bulging nor set too deeply in the orbits. Dark brown in colour. The conjunctiva is not apparent. The expression is lively.

Ears: Finely attached, in line with the eye, just reaching the end of the nose when drawn forward, ending in a point, turned inwards and covered by finer and shorter hair than on the rest of the body.

Mouth: The jaws and teeth are strong, meeting in a perfect even scissor bite. The upper incisors cover the lower in close contact. The incisors are set square to the jaws. Absence of first premolars is not penalised.

Neck: Rather short and wellmusculed. Absence of dewlap.

Forequarters: Overview: The limbs have good bone.

Shoulder: Oblique and well set on the thorax.

Elbow: In the line with the body.

Forearm: Vertical or curving slightly in (which is not to be sought after).

Metacarpus (Pastern): Seen in profile, somewhat oblique. Seen from the front, in the axis of the body or slanting slightly out (which is not to be sought after).

Body: Back: Short for a basset and broad. Never swaybacked.

Loin: Broad and muscular

Chest: Deep and broad.

Ribs: Rather rounded

Abdomen: The underline rises only slightly towards the rear.

Hindquarters: Overview: Well muscled. The limbs are well poised. Seen from behind, the rear limbs are parallel, neither close nor wide.

Thigh: Long and well muscled.

Hock: Well let down and moderately bent.

Metatarsus (rear pastern): Vertical.

Feet: Compact with the toes tight together, arched and with solid nails. The pads are hard.

Tail: Carried slightly sickle-fashioned, of medium length, large at the base, often bristly and well tapered at the end. In action, the tail is carried above the top line and makes regular movements from side to side.

Gait/Movement: Lively.

Coat: Skin: Rather thick, supple.

Coat: Very rough, harsh, rather short, never woolly or curly. The face shouldn't be too bushy.

Colour: Fawn coloured, from golden wheaten to red brick in hue. A few black hairs dispersed on the back and ears are tolerated. Occasionally the presence of a small white star on the chest, something not sought after.

Sizes: Height: 32cm (12.6 ins) minimum to 38cm (15.5 ins) maximum with a tolerance of 2cm (0.8 ins) for exceptional specimens.

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

SEVERE FAULTS

Behaviour:

- Timid

Head:

- Wide, flat skull. Superciliary arches too prominent.

- Short or pointed muzzle. Heavy and pendulous upper lips.

Eyes

- Light

Ears

- Flat and large

Body

- Frail in appearance. Top line not level enough. Too tucked up.

Tail

- Out of line.

Limbs

- Poor bone. Splayed feet.

Coat

- Sparse, smooth, fine, soft.

ELIMINATING FAULTS

Temperament

- Aggressive or overly shy

Lack of type

- Insufficient breed characteristics, which means the animal on the whole doesn�t resemble other samples of the breed.

Jaws/Teeth.

- Overshot or undershot.

Eyes

- Overly light

Pigmentation

- Totally or partially unpigmented areas on the nose or the edges of eyelids or lips.

Tail

- Kinked

Forequarters

- Excessive crook

Dewclaws

- Presence of dewclaws (This breed is always free from dewclaws)

Coat

- Long woolly coat. Any coat other than that defined by the standard.

Height

- Outside the limits defined by the standard.

Defects

- Noticeable invalidating defect. Anatomical malformation

Any dog clearly showing physical or behavioural abnormalities shall be disqualified.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I have 3 Fauves currently living with me and another possibly (temporarily) arriving in the next couple of months. I met my first Fauve just over 2 years ago at the Murray Valley International and have been besotted ever since. That day I met Marie who I picked up 2 weeks later. About fourteen months later Daphne joined us and six months after that Marie's brother General arrived for a holiday.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

The breed was developed in Brittany in France to hunt in packs as a scenthound. They hunted small game from rabbits through to Roe Deer. They were (and still are) generally owned by farmers in France who have a small pack for hunting. ETA - 2012 will mark the 30th anniversary of the first Fauve, Naika Des Vieilles Combes being imported into the UK. At this point all Fauves in Australia are from English lines which is why this point is so relevant.

3. How common is it in Australia?

There are only 20 in Australia (and 7 of those are only seven weeks old :thanks: ) so they are probably one of the rarer breeds in Australia.

4. What is the average lifespan?

Apparently the average lifespan is 12 years though it is hard to say for sure as the oldest Fauve in Australia is coming up for 5 years.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Fauves rock :):eek: . Running an all breeds rescue it was vital that I found a breed who would get on with other dogs. It was also important that they be kid and cat social. The Fauves haven't let me down one iota, even General who arrived aged 2 years never having lived with either kids or cats. My Fauves love children - so much so that at last year's Melbourne Royal Marie spent most of General Specials lying in the walkway so that people, particularly children had to stop. She loves children and is very gentle with them. Daphne is a little more enthusiastic but loves them just the same. Daphne's brother is best friends to a 10 year old boy in Melbourne and sleeps on his bed every night :eek: .

Happy dogs but also able to be calm and quiet I'm amazed at what great little dogs they are.

ETA - I have met and spent time with 9 of the 20 Fauves currently in Australia and they all have spectacular temperaments - bombproof is how I would best describe them. I can only imagine that the other 11 are the same, particularly given that 7 of them are only babies.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Mine get a real mix of exercise - its either a feast or a famine sadly. When I was researching the breed I read that they will take as much or as little exercise as you can give and I have to say that I have found this to be true. If they don't go for a walk for a few days they are fine. If you only go for half an hour a day six days a week and then three hours once a week they will be fine, if you only go for an hour walk 3 times a week they will be fine - provided they get to spend time with you as part of the family. They are diggers (chasing insects etc) and they are worse if they haven't been for a good walk.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I think so - they would be particularly good for families with kids.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Probably not though I don't know how much this has been explored in Australia. I think that there is currently only one Fauve living as an only dog in Australia and as she is in a pet home I haven't heard much about how she is doing. Fauves are an animal that has historically run in packs - they love the company of other dogs and whinge like no bodies business if left alone - well mine do anyway. Provided they have another dog for company they are quiet and well behaved - as a result my Fauves share a giant crate unless the girls are in season. They also seem to really love their breed - Marie has really blossomed since Daphne & General came to live with us. I know on the Fauve Yahoo Group there are people in the UK with only one Fauve and they seem to have no trouble - mine are quite possibly used to having lots of company.

9. How much grooming is required?

A brush every couple of weeks and a bath every couple of months. Marie's breeder calls them Teflon dogs and I must say this is a very apt description - the mud dries on their harsh coat and just brushes out easily.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

No, not at all. I actually think they would be a fabulous dog for families with disabled children as they are very gentle, love kids and aren't too small or too big.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

No. There are some issues with epilepsy in some lines in the UK and I've heard about a few dogs with allergies but nothing here in Australia that we are currently aware of. There is a register being kept in the UK of any health problems that crop up but so far they are looking to be a very disease free breed.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

No health tests necessary. At the moment there is only one breeder in Australia though I hope to be having a litter within the next twelve months.

Edited by Trisven13

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Gayle.   

They sound like a really good breed for a child who wants a dog of their own. Would they be easy for a child (older child, late primary or young teen) to train in obedience?

Would they make a good performance prospect? ie, agility, flyball etc.

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Hmmmm - good questions.

I'm currently working on training Marie so that she can be the first dual-titled Fauve in Australia - not having got there yet it is hard to say. They train like most scenthounds..... some days good, some days not so good :( . My guys are really, really food focussed so food rewards work very, very well. I think that they would train very well and they seem to respond really well to kids so I would think that they would be a good option but as it has never been explored yet in Australia it is hard to say definitively.

They definitely show well for kids BUT are quite heavy to lift on the table so would need a late primary/young teen to show them. My girls are the most animated when the kids are on the end of the lead.

Flyball - not so sure but I'd love for someone to try :p . Mine don't fetch balls but I've never taught them to. I think they'd really enjoy agility - I think they'd find it great fun and it is another thing I'd love to do with my Fauves.

Fauves love fun - they love when their owner is happy and they are a part of it but they do seem to pick up very easily on your nerves so they would do really well with someone who didn't put too much pressure on themselves as that would communicate down the lead. I learnt this the hard way with showing my Fauves :love: and with obedience training - the more nervous I get the less fun they have, the more relaxed I am the better they do. I think that is why they love kids - they're so uncomplicated by comparison to us adults :eek:

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becks   

You said grooming was just a good brush every couple of weeks, but what else needs doing with the coat eg. stripping them??

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Hey Becks :laugh: .

To be perfectly honest you would quite possibly be able to provide as much information on this as me, if not more as you have probably had the benefit of seeing more variety in lines than I have.

The Fauves we have in Australia are from lines with less coat than some of the other lines and so grooming really is as minimal as described. I HAVE however seen photos of lots of pet Fauves that look vastly different to those we have here and I believe that there is a great variance between the different lines - well so I have been told.

Some Fauves such as this girl have enormous coat - I've been told by Judges who've gone over her that she possibly has the best structure of any bitch in England but she has so much coat it is hard to see. This is her quite stripped out.

Brevelay Maid in England

Marie has very little coat. The texture of her coat is fabulous - really coarse and harsh - but there just is never enough of it :rofl: . Everytime I get excited about her coat she comes into season and wham - its gone again :eek: .

Daphne has more than Marie. General has more than Daphne. Chrissy has more than General. :)

General needed a really good stripping out when he arrived with me but so far no Fauves in Australia need regular stripping. I strip mine out more than Neil does as I like to keep their coats nice and neat - he is happy to let me strip his out though so I don't think he minds ;) .

It is difficult as I'm going so completely on photos and on-line discussions but there really appears to be a huge variance between the Fauves - some lines have more leg under them, some lines have more coat, some lines have deeper colour. Australia has the leggier, less coated lines so far.

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mooduf.   

I have a question, although probably a bit of a silly one.

How do you pronounce the fauve in the name? Is it fORve, or fOWve?

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fOWve :thumbsup:

Trust me it is not a silly question as lots of people have difficulty with the name. Fauve is the diminutive used for the breed.

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corvus   

Can I just say that I met a Fauve at Morisset show last year and she was insanely tolerant. She let my then 5 month old Finnish Lapphund puppy lie on top of her and just lay down and maintained this saint-like patience. Lappies have a pretty awesomely sweet temperament, but from what I saw of that one Fauve, I think they are even sweeter!

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AmandaS   
fOWve :rofl:

Trust me it is not a silly question as lots of people have difficulty with the name. Fauve is the diminutive used for the breed.

The French pronounce the word as fOHve (rhymes with ROVE). Why wouldn't we use the same pronunciation?

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becks   
Hey Becks :) .

To be perfectly honest you would quite possibly be able to provide as much information on this as me, if not more as you have probably had the benefit of seeing more variety in lines than I have.

The Fauves we have in Australia are from lines with less coat than some of the other lines and so grooming really is as minimal as described. I HAVE however seen photos of lots of pet Fauves that look vastly different to those we have here and I believe that there is a great variance between the different lines - well so I have been told.

Some Fauves such as this girl have enormous coat - I've been told by Judges who've gone over her that she possibly has the best structure of any bitch in England but she has so much coat it is hard to see. This is her quite stripped out.

Brevelay Maid in England

Marie has very little coat. The texture of her coat is fabulous - really coarse and harsh - but there just is never enough of it :( . Everytime I get excited about her coat she comes into season and wham - its gone again :) .

Daphne has more than Marie. General has more than Daphne. Chrissy has more than General. :rofl:

General needed a really good stripping out when he arrived with me but so far no Fauves in Australia need regular stripping. I strip mine out more than Neil does as I like to keep their coats nice and neat - he is happy to let me strip his out though so I don't think he minds :mad .

It is difficult as I'm going so completely on photos and on-line discussions but there really appears to be a huge variance between the Fauves - some lines have more leg under them, some lines have more coat, some lines have deeper colour. Australia has the leggier, less coated lines so far.

Looking at some of those photos from your link, I wonder if the owners have scissored the heads, throat and legs of some of these dogs and that is why they have such a profuse and pale colour in these areas?

I've been grooming a Fauve (bit of a blind leading the blind as her breeder doesn't groom her own dogs, but takes them to her breeder for show grooms, so I am trying to do my best to look at her dogs when groomed, so see what I'm aiming for). Now the dog I do seems to have an average coat, so easy to strip just with fingers. She comes in every 3 or 4 months, sometimes for a tidy and others for the full coat to come out (as it is dropping out anyway) but even long, the coat still looks quite tidy. I would say it is similar to a Border Terrier coat. The Fauve coat seems to be one you can't roll as there just isn't the number of hairs per area to make it thick enough to be able to roll, so owners should be used to a variety of looks with their dogs coat.

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fOWve :thumbsup:

Trust me it is not a silly question as lots of people have difficulty with the name. Fauve is the diminutive used for the breed.

The French pronounce the word as fOHve (rhymes with ROVE). Why wouldn't we use the same pronunciation?

Sorry - I read that wrongly the first time - yes it is pronounced Fauve to rhyme with Rove. :champagne:

Becks - it is interesting you say that it is not a coat you can roll as I have found that myself. My girls definitely lose more coat after a season than normally - as I spend more time with more Fauves from different lines I will be able to see if that is true of all Fauves. As the standard says the coat should be "Very rough, harsh, rather short, never woolly or curly" - to me some of the coats on the UK dogs wouldn't fit the "rather short" part but that may be because I'm used to the lines we have here.

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becks   

in our breed standard is says of the coat 'Very harsh, dense and flat. Never long or woolly.' no mention of 'rather short' so perhaps that is why the dogs don't fit that part of the standard! It may also reflect the way our champ shows fall throughout the year and an onwer pprefering to show a dog in longer coat then miss a couple of shows or them wanting to delay taking to coat out, so they have a good coat in time for a particular show.

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Interesting that your standard doesn't contain that. That is the new FCI Standard that we now follow.

Wish I could get over to the UK and Europe to see some of these dogs in the flesh.

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Yeah I saw that. I know that her breeder is aware of her and I believe other PBGV people are referring over to the rescue group. She sounds like a character :laugh:

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