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Troy

Tibetan Mastiff

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Troy   

The Tibetan Mastiff

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/Breed_Details.aspx?bid=181 )

Group:

Group 6 (Utility)

General Appearance:

Large, powerfully built, slightly longer than high. Well boned and muscled, never light but always agile. Impressive head provides a noble, dignified look, enhanced by a mane, which is more pronounced in males, balanced by a well feathered tail carried over the back.

Characteristics:

A loyal companion and guardian. Slow to mature.

Temperament:

Independently minded, aloof and protective. Calm and patient. May be wary of strangers.

Head And Skull:

Broad, heavy and strong. Skull large, with strongly defined occiput and marked stop. Length from nose to stop equal or slightly less than length from stop to occiput. Muzzle fairly broad, well filled, blunt, and square viewed from all sides. Broad, black nose, well open nostrils. Lips well developed with moderate flews. In maturity, some wrinkling on head extending from above the eyes to thee corner of the mouth.

Eyes:

Very expressive, medium size, dark brown. Set well apart, oval and slightly slanting. Dark, close fitting eye rims.

Ears:

Medium size, triangular, pendent, not set too low, hanging close to the head. When alert, carried forward. Ear leathers covered with soft, short hair.

Mouth:

Jaws strong with perfect, regular and complete scissor bite. i.e. upper teeth closely overlapping lower teeth and set square to the jaws. Level bite acceptable. Full dentition desirable.

Neck:

Strong, well muscled, slightly arched. Not too much dewlap.

Forequarters:

Muscular, well laid shoulders. Strongly boned, straight legs with strong, slightly sloping pasterns.

Body:

From point of shoulder to point of buttock slightly longer than height at withers, as is 10 to 9. Strong and straight back. Broad, muscular loins, with very slightly sloping croup. Chest rather deep, of moderate breadth. Ribcage oval ribs well sprung but not barrelled carried well back. Brisket reaching to, or just below, elbows.

Hindquarters:

Powerful, muscular, with moderate angulation and strong, low set hocks. Hind legs, seen from behind, parallel. Single or double dewclaws may be present.

Feet:

Fairly large, strong, with thick pads, rounded and compact. Having good feathering between toes.

Tail:

Medium to long. Set on high. Loosely curled over back to one side. Well feathered.

Gait/Movement:

Powerful and free, with purpose and agility. Measured and deliberate when walking. At speed will tend to single track.

Coat:

Males carry noticeably more than females. Quality of greater importance than quantity. Densely coated, fairly long, thick, with heavy, woolly undercoat in cold weather, which becomes rather sparse in warmer months. Hair fine, hard and straight, never silky, curly, or wavy. Hair on face short. Neck and shoulders heavily coated, giving mane-like appearance. Tail heavily feathered, hind legs well feathered on upper rear parts.

Colour:

Rich black, with or without tan, slate grey, with or without tan, rich golden. The rich tan markings appear above the eyes, on muzzle, on chest, the lower part of legs and underside of tail. Spectacle markings around the eyes acceptable. White star on breast permissible. Minimal white markings on feet tolerated. Cream, white, chocolate/liver, particolour, brindle or flecked are undesirable.

Sizes:

A minimum height of 66 cms (26 ins) in dogs and 61 cms (24 ins) in bitches desirable, but on no account should type be sacrificed to size alone.

Faults:

Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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jangbu   

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

My name is Kristie bates and I am a breeder of Tibetan mastiff in Australia under the prefix Jangbu. We have imported Tms from China and Europe to help develop the breed further here in Australia. 

 

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

The Tibetan Mastiff (TM or Dokhyi, meaning tied dog) is a very ancient primitive dog originating in central asia. They were used originally as guards of villages, camps, people, monasteries and livestock. They were tied through the day and set loose to roam at night to ward off thieves and large predators such as snow leopards

 

3. How common is it in Australia?

The TM is still a relatively rare breed throughout the world but is becoming more popular. They have been locked away high in the Tibetan plateau for many years meaning they have not been available to westerners until recent years. In Australia there is currently a handful of dedicated breeders who regularly import to help introduce well needed new bloodlines into our gene pool here. There is generally a waiting list for puppies as the TM has a single estrous per year during autumn/winter

 

4. What is the average lifespan?

A relatively healthy breed that can live to 10-14 years

 

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

The Tm is a large, powerful primitive guardian breed. They are very intelligent, stubborn and excellent at problem solving. They have been bred for 1000's of years to think for themselves and can be difficult to train. In general they are not food motivated and one must earn the mutual respect and trust of a TM. The TM in general should be calm yet can be aloof and not accepting of strangers. They are first and foremost a guardian dog and even the most loving social Tm can still surprise with guardian skills when the need arises. They are nocturnal and are prone to barking at night. They can also be destructive. Once you share a bond with a TM however, they are a dog like no other. They have unconditional love for those apart of the family and are very devoted. They love being with you and keeping a watchful eye over there surroundings to ensure you are safe

 

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

The TM requires more mental stimulation than physical exercise however a good walk every day is a must

 

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

The TM is not a breed for everyone. They can be a challenging dog and require an experienced and dedicated owner who will train, socialise and care for there needs for the lifetime of the dog 

 

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

In general, the TM is not a dog to be left along for long periods. They require an interactive relationship with there owner and enjoy other canine company. The TM can however be same sex aggressive 

 

9. How much grooming is required?

The Tm is a relatively clean and odor free breed. They require a good brush at least once a week and will only ever drop coat during the warmer months. This "blow" of the coat is a very large shed where all of the undercoat will come away making the dog cooler for the warmer months. During this time the dog will need extensive grooming to remove all of the old and shedding coat. Tms also drool a very small amount

 

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

The TM in general loves children and are very calm and gentle with family members however, they are a large powerful breed that can easily knock over a child and should not be left unattended

 

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

As with all large/giant breeds, hip and elbow dysplasia is common, as can be entropian. It is important to purchase a puppy from a reputable breeder and follow all directions to ensure your puppy receives the correct diet and exercise regime as directed by your breeder. In some bloodlines low Thyroid and Epilepsy can also be a problem

 

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

When buying a TM it is very important to do as much research as possible. This is a dog for life and is a big commitment. The TM can vary in looks, coat type and temperament. It is important to speak to as many breeders and TM owners as possible about there dogs. Go to kennels and meet dogs in person. Check the official health testing of the breeding dogs (hip,elbow,thyroid), check the temperament of the parents and any offspring they have produced if possible. Decide on the "type" of Tm you would like. Do you prefer a shorter coat or a longer coat, do you prefer a guardian type temperament or a more family oriented temperament, do you prefer a more asian type look or European type look. Then once you have decided what is right for you, ask the breeder you have chosen about waiting lists, ancestors of the breeding dogs, health of the breeding dogs and also if there are any contracts or special conditions involved with the purchase of the puppy. Expect to be placed onto a waiting list and NEVER buy a TM puppy from an unregistered breeder. ALWAYS make sure that the breeder you are talking to is registered with the ANKC state governing body for there state

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mita   

So good to see comprehensive information from a breeder about the fascinating Tibetan Mastiff.  I was in a Petbarn store with my 2 Tibetan Spaniels (on leads) when we walked around a corner straight into a beautiful black Tibetan Mastiff with his owner.  The 3 dogs just paused for a few seconds, then all together their tails began to wag.  I couldn't help but wonder if they figured they spoke the same language!

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RuralPug   
7 hours ago, brownsugar said:

They grow so big

Yes they do! :)

Which is why good breeders are very very careful to make sure that puppy buyers know exactly what they are taking on with this gorgeous breed!

 

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