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Seanbuzz

Early Desexing Potentially Causing Health Problems

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Seanbuzz   

I'm aware there's increasing evidence to suggest that early desexing can cause a few health problems later in life including; Juvenile or underdeveloped brains, serious endocrine adrenal and thyroid problems, and it can also affect the density of bones leading to increased chances of joint problems. 

 

All of the research I can find is orientated towards desexing before an animal has fully developed, once they have fully developed it is usually best to desex them preventing other issues including cancers which can be prevented through desexing the dog. I believe the consensus is that Dogs are fully developed by the time they are 18-24 months old. 

 

Does anyone know/know of a Vet (In Victoria) who are aware of this research? Some of you may have seen the thread I posted in the General Forum, but basically, we need an exemption until she is 24 months old. This would will us enough time to move from this Council area. It will also give my submission to the Department of Agriculture a chance to be assessed (My submission is in relation to an exemption for those classified as micro-breeders, I'm asking they be exempt from requirements to desex in the Victorian Council areas who enforce it). Even if we can only get an exemption till 18 month's that would be better than nothing.

 

I'm seeking Vet recommendations Please :) Feel free to PM me if you prefer.

 

Cheers

Edited by Seanbuzz

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Kajirin   

You can also be on the lookout for vets who perform partial spays [females - removal of the uterus only] or vasectomies [males].  They will technically be 'desexed', but they keep their hormone producing bits to allow proper growth when maturing.  Whether this would be in accordance with the state's laws I'm not sure.  But something to mull over with your vet.

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Skeptvet.com blog has done a couple good literature reviews on this.  Bottom line is it's complicated.  Seems to vary between breeds.  Different results for different ailments.  I think I remember some sex difference as well... desexing has fewer positives for boys if I remember correctly.

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Here’s a bit of recent research, but it basically highlights what sandgrubber says. There’s no one size fits all. It depends on breed, age, size, gender etc. for one dog it might be linked with an increase and for another a decrease in certain illnesses. 

 

It it might be a good read through to see if the klee kai or close cousin breeds were included so you know how the surgery or lack thereof might predispose to certain things:

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/317284794_Correlation_of_neuter_status_and_expression_of_heritable_disorders

 

cant hell you on a Vet. Mine doesn’t seem to care about my dogs intact status but that doesn’t mean they’d write a letter. :( you’re in a super tricky situation. 

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Seanbuzz   

Thank you all for the info, I'll read that paper and go through skeptvet.com tonight :)

 

It is a tricky situation, I'm also looking into the compounding effect of possibly traumatic events. As she is already 1yr old, has traveled from the US, leaving her known family behind I'm afraid adding another potentially traumatic event, right as she needs to start bonding with us could cause her to relate all of those traumatic events with us. I worry this could potentially prevent her from properly bonding with us. Especially when you consider in relation to desexing we will be dropping her off and picking her up, so of all the scary events, the one that happens right as she might be starting to settle down is instigated by us. In all honesty, I hadn't thought about just how scary such a journey could be for a dog, especially when they don't get to reunite with their known family/pack at the end of it, I'm feeling like a monster. All I can do now is put my best effort in to helping her settle in, in every way I possibly can. 

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I don't think dogs (or should I say bitches) are much traumatized by being spayed.  Mine have always bounced back very quickly...the big problem has always been keeping them quiet for the 10 days the vet prescribes...and they haven't developed fear of the vet clinic either.

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JulesP   

For me early desxing would be prior to six months. Pushing it to a year. I doubt you will get a vet to say that 1 year is too young to desex and will cause health issues. 

 

To be honest whilst I do sympathise with your predicament it is also annoying me a bit that you are trying to use health as a loophole. I have a dog that I couldn't desex for health reasons and it was not a pleasant experience. No one wants a sick pet. 

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Seanbuzz   
4 hours ago, JulesP said:

For me early desxing would be prior to six months. Pushing it to a year. I doubt you will get a vet to say that 1 year is too young to desex and will cause health issues. 

 

To be honest whilst I do sympathise with your predicament it is also annoying me a bit that you are trying to use health as a loophole. I have a dog that I couldn't desex for health reasons and it was not a pleasant experience. No one wants a sick pet. 

It sounds like you've had a tough time, I really didn't mean to upset you or anyone, and I'm truly sorry to have done so.     

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