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Animal House

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About Animal House

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    Overseas

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  1. Sighthounds

    Such gorgeous fluffers, Bosco has the most adorable face. And isn't Charlie cat is a handsome boy Really great pics Griz, well done.
  2. So worried about snakes!!

    Cute pooch you have there Baz!
  3. Nash, my gentle giant.

    Really sorry BJ, it's so hard, no matter their age. What a handsome old boy he was, and so comforting that he had you right there...Run free Nash.
  4. The euthanasia process

    Hi, and welcome to the forum, sorry it's not under better circumstances. Most vets have their own way of doing it, I'm sure you can ask for sedation first if you're wanting that, or if you're dog is nervous. For my old boy, I wanted him to go as peacefully as possible at home. The local vets were able to come out (lovely lady vet and a nurse) and they sat and talked with me a bit (and my other dog was on her bed in the same room, as they wanted her to be able to sniff him etc once he'd passed) . They didn't need to sedate, as he was quite old and his time had come... I had my dog snuggled on my lap, holding him and telling him what a good boy he was. They slipped the needle in while I was feeding him a piece of chicken, once he finished that he fell asleep. And I burst into tears, the nurse had tears in her eyes and so did the vet. They wrapped him in a nice warm blanket and took him ever so gently with them. It was a good ending to a long, well loved, life. Now I've got tears again remembering it. So I hope that helps somewhat, that was just my experience. I would never take my dog to the vets, I would always do it at home, where they feel safe. (not bagging others, that's just me)
  5. 4CYTE Osteoarthritis in Dogs

    Just in my own experience, I've been using this on my 13yo Staffy, as she was diagnosed with aged related joint problems in her back legs. She was on Metacam for a few weeks...the vet said to get joint guard and fish oil supplements to follow on from that. To be honest, I've not noticed any difference, and that's been nearly 3 months on it, plus another supplement. I'll be going back to the vet for more Metacam.
  6. Help with doberman breeder

    I noted the Dad "Game on Australian Dream" is up for sale, here. The breeder breeds Shar Pei though, so not sure about that. The bloodlines seem good (according to Google) but I'd want to know what the Mum/Dad are used for, have they been shown, do they breed specifically show lines or working dogs? What health testing have they had? I'm sure someone experienced with Dobes will be along soon with more info. Welcome to the forum, and great job on doing your research first.
  7. Dozens of dogs confirmed sick in investigation into popular dog food Advance Dermocare More than 70 dogs across Australia have been struck down by a debilitating and incurable illness, 7.30 can reveal, with a popular pet food being investigated as the cause. Melbourne University have confirmed 74 cases of megaesophagus, and in all cases the dogs ate Advance Dermocare. Advance Dermocare dry dog food was voluntarily recalled at the end of last month after a spike in megaesophagus cases was discovered. The rare condition causes the oesophagus to become enlarged and lose the ability to move food down to the stomach. Melbourne University said it would likely take months to determine whether there was a definitive link to the food. The manufacturer said its investigations had not revealed a root cause, but it had offered to reimburse vet bills. 7.30 has spoken to a number of owners who say their dogs have megaesophagus and were being fed Advance Dermocare. The condition can be fatal and 7.30 is aware of eight cases where the dogs have been euthanased. Link to the whole story HERE Very sad
  8. Oh isn't she just the sweetest little dog, that face
  9. Claratyne & evening primrose dosage rates

    Hi Samantha, and welcome to the forum, Did your vet advise giving him the Claratyne? They should be able to tell you the correct dosage. If not, I'd definitely get him checked by a vet, they can check out any allergies and give out the correct medication if any is needed. Self dosing of human meds for dogs is a bit of a minefield, and can be lethal because the amounts differ, much better to be safe than sorry.
  10. Lovely news, a great ending. (don't forget to post up some photos once you have all settled in)
  11. Gilly is 21 today!!!!!!

    Happy 21 Gilly, what an amazing age to get to. Raw food for the win.
  12. Mine have taught me that they don't care about a persons social status, financial wealth or lack of, their appearance or popularity. If I'm in my pj's for days, look like crap when I'm sick, dressed up to go somewhere, flat broke or have money in the bank....they don't care, they don't discriminate. It's all waggy tails and kisses, and the same for visitors. I wish there was more people like that.
  13. Kaos

    No words will ever be enough, they leave us with such huge holes in our hearts. Hugs to you and the kidlets. Run free at the bridge Kaos, Atlas will be waiting for you, lots of Dol dogs will be there to greet you. :
  14. Kaos - lymphoma

    Thinking of you Teebs, a difficult time for you guys
  15. Looking for a Dandy Dinmont breeder in aus.

    Or you could try the relevant dog associations Dandie Dinmont Terriers © 2018 CTC Productions Pty Limited. All rights reserved. The material presented on this website, may not be reproduced or distributed, in whole or in part, without the prior written permission of CTC Productions. Breed: Dandie Dinmont Temperament: Friendly, active & loyal Lifespan: 14 years Recommended for: Families The Dandie Dinmont is probably the only dog breed in the world named after a fictitious character. The original Dandie Dinmont was a farmer from the Scottish borderlands, who featured in an 1814 novel, ‘Guy Mannering’, by Sir Walter Scott. Scott wrote that the character, Mr Dinmont, had developed a particular style of terrier much admired by the local people for their fearlessness before weasels and stoats. Mr Dinmont had only two names, Pepper and Mustard, for his 20 dogs: “There’s auld Pepper and auld Mustard, and young Pepper and young Mustard, and little Pepper and little Mustard…”. The names referring to the individual’s coat colouring. The real Dandie Dinmont was probably farmer Jamie Davidson of Hindlee who bred a race of ‘mustard and pepper’ terriers. Sir Walter Scott (1771-1820) himself owned a matching pair of mustard and pepper terriers and was a great supporter of the line. Its popularity peaked during the 19th century but has since waned this century. It failed to impress well-known animal writer Gerald Durrell who, in his book ‘My Family and Other Animals’, wrote that his brother Larry Durrell proclaimed of the breed: “She looks as though she was bred to go down holes after sewage.” It is a rare breed, there are less than 100 dogs in Australia today. Appearance: The Dandie Dinmont is a dwarf, whiskery-faced dog with a lot of appeal.It has a large head, long, slightly arched body and short legs giving it a low-slung look similar to a Dachshund. It stands 20-28cm (8-10″) at the shoulder and has a double coat. The outer coat is harsh, often described as “crisp and weatherproof”. The undercoat is soft and downy. It has a soft topknot of fur, looking like fluffy Afro. Temperament: The Dandie Dinmont is said to be the most placid terrier. They are friendly, adaptable but with an independent streak. Individual dogs may bond strongly with their owner and not welcome other pets. Health: May be susceptible to back strain. Avoid stairs. Glaucoma is an eye disease causing blindness which may be corrected surgically. Cushings syndrome is a wasting disease characterised by extreme thirst and urination, due to excess cortisol produced by the adrenal gland. It can be controlled by drugs. Grooming: Exhibition dogs have their coats ‘stripped’, which means literally removing old long hair to expose the new, coloured coat. Only the first 2cm of the coat is coloured, either mustard or pepper. If the coat grows too long the dog can appear white and pet owners, who may prefer to clip the coat rather than strip it, may end up with a dog which looks similar to a well-trimmed West Highland White Terrier. A regular weekly brushing is required or the coat can matt because it doesn’t shed like most dogs. Breeders also suggest trimming the hair around the dog’s anus to minimise problems with faeces catching in the fur. Ideal owner & housepet potential: While owners say they are good family dogs, Dandie Dinmonts will often bond more closely with one person. They do not like being left alone so are best suited to an owner who is home for most of the day. Their small size and need for company makes them well suited to older people or those in flats. The coat requires a commitment to weekly brushing. Space & exercise: Dandie Dinmonts can take as much or as little regulated exercise as offered but a backyard romp each day is a recommended minimum. Longtime owners recommend sound fences as many Dandie Dinmonts are accomplished escapists. Training: Their typical independent terrier attitude means they are harder to train, requiring perseverance and patience. Basic leash training is recommended. National contacts To find up-to-date contacts for breeders, contact the following organisations. The Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC) The Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC) www.ankc.org.au Dogs NSW http://www.dogsnsw.org.au/breeders-directory Email: [email protected] Phone: 1300 728 022 (NSW only) or (02) 9834 3022 Fax: (02) 9834 3872 Dogs Victoria http://www.vca.org.au Email: [email protected] Phone: (03) 9788 2500 Fax: (03) 9788 2599 Dogs ACT http://www.actca.asn.au Email: [email protected] Phone: (02) 6241 4404 – Fax: (02) 6241 1129. Dogs West http://www.cawa.asn.au Email: [email protected] Phone: (08) 9455 1188 Fax: (08) 9455 119 Dogs SA http://dogssa.com.au Phone: (08) 8349 4797 Canine Control Council of Queensland http://www.cccq.org.au Email: [email protected] Phone: (07) 3252 2661 Fax: (07) 3252 3864 Tasmanian Canine Association http://www.tasdogs.com Email: [email protected] Phone: (03) 6272 9443 Fax: (03) 6273 0844 Dogs NT http://www.territorydogworld.com Email: [email protected] Phone: (08) 8984 3570 Fax: (08) 8984 3409 The Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC) www.ankc.org.au Dogs NSW http://www.dogsnsw.org.au/breeders-directory Email: [email protected] Phone: 1300 728 022 (NSW only) or (02) 9834 3022 Fax: (02) 9834 3872 Dogs Victoria http://www.vca.org.au Email: [email protected] Phone: (03) 9788 2500 Fax: (03) 9788 2599 Dogs ACT http://www.actca.asn.au Email: [email protected] Phone: (02) 6241 4404 – Fax: (02) 6241 1129. Dogs West http://www.cawa.asn.au Email: [email protected] Phone: (08) 9455 1188 Fax: (08) 9455 1190 Dogs SA http://dogssa.com.au Phone: (08) 8349 4797 Canine Control Council of Queensland http://www.cccq.org.au Email: [email protected] Phone: (07) 3252 2661 Fax: (07) 3252 3864 Tasmanian Canine Association http://www.tasdogs.com Email: [email protected] Phone: (03) 6272 9443 Fax: (03) 6273 0844 Dogs NT http://www.territorydogworld.com Email: [email protected] Phone: (08) 8984 3570
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