Troy

Bichon Frise

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The Bichon Frise

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=27 )

Group: Group 1 (Toys)

General Appearance: Toy dog standing less than 30cm tall. The head carriage is proud and high; the coat falling in soft, corkscrew curls.

Characteristics: Lively little dog, with eyes alert and full of expression.

Temperament: Gay and happy.

Head And Skull: The skull longer than the muzzle, the whole head in balance with the body. The muzzle should not be thick or heavy; nor should it be snipy; the cheeks flat and not very strongly muscled; the stop should be slight and the hollow between the eyebrows just visible. Skull flat when touched, although the hair tends to make it look round. The nose should be round, black, soft and shiny. The lips should be fine, fairly tight and completely black, drooping just sufficiently for the lower lips to be covered by the upper, but never heavy nor hanging. The lower lip should be neither heavy, protruding nor flabby and should never show the mucous membrane when the mouth is closed.

Eyes: Dark, with dark eye-rims, fairly round, never almond shaped not obliquely set; lively, not too big; never showing any white. Neither large nor prominent. The socket should not be pronounced.

Ears: Narrow and delicate. Hanging close to the head and well covered with tightly curled, long hair. Carried forward when the dog is alert but in such manner that the forward edge touches the skull and not carried obliquely away from the head. The leather should reach halfway along the muzzle.

Mouth: Scissor bite, that is to say, the incisors of the lower jaw should be placed immediately behind and in contact with those of the upper jaw.

Neck: Fairly long, carried high and proudly. Round and slim near the head, gradually broadening to fit smoothly into the shoulders. Length about one third the length of the body (proportions of 33cm - 11cm for a dog of 27 cm high at the withers).

Forequarters: Shoulders oblique, not prominent, and equal in length to the upper arm (approx. 10 cm). The upper arm should fit close to the body,. Legs straight when seen from the front, perpendicular and finely boned. The pastern should be short and straight when viewed from the front, very slightly sloping when viewed from the side.

Body: Chest well developed, with deep brisket. The floating ribs well rounded and not terminating abruptly. Loin broad, well-muscled, slightly arched and well tucked-up. The pelvis broad, the croup slightly rounded.

Hindquarters: Thighs broad and well-muscled, oblique. Stifles well bent and hocks well let down.

Feet: Small, rounded and well knuckled-up. Nails preferably black.

Tail: Normally carried raised and curled gracefully over the back but never tightly curled. It should not be docked and should not touch the backbone but the hair should always fall on to the back. Slightly low set.

Gait/Movement: (Not detailed)

Coat: Fine, silky, with soft corkscrew curls. Neither flat nor corded, and measuring 7-10 cm in length. The dog may be presented untrimmed or have muzzle and feet slightly tidied up. [in Australia the coat is usually trimmed to reveal the natural outline of the body. It is rounded off from any direction and never cut so short as to create an overly trimmed or squared off appearance.

Colour: Pure white. Under the white coat dark pigment is preferred. Black, blue or beige markings are often found on the skin.

Sizes: Height: Less than 30 cm, smallness being highly desirable.

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness of the fault should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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What type of show preparation is required?

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I have heard that they are "yappy" dogs - is this true in general?

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My little fella was a bit barky when he was young (up to 1 year), but very quiet as an adult dog. I would not describe his bark as yappy, though - for a small dog it's quite a mellow, medium toned bark.

He will still bark when my other dog gets barking, but I can't remember the last time he started barking at anything in his own right. If I take him walking at the beach on his own he won't utter a sound but just wag his tail and greet every other dog on the beach. Brilliant social skills!

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Hi All,

I am a Bichon owner and lover :thumbsup: They are not yappy at all - they will bark if they feel its needed but its a lower bark - a lot like a bigger dog than a toy breed.

In answer to Troy's questions..

1. What is my relationship with the breed?

I am the Owner of two Bichons, Atilla and Genghis who are both pedigree. Both were bought from breeders listed on CAWA and Dogzonline

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

The Bichon Frisé descended from the Barbet or Water Spaniel, from which came the name Barbichon, later shortened to "Bichon". The Bichons were divided into four categories: the Bichon Malteise, the Bichon Bolognaise, the Bichon Havanese and the Bichon Tenerife. All originated in the Mediterranean area.

Because of their merry disposition, they traveled much and were often used as barter by sailors as they moved from continent to continent. The dogs found early success in Spain and it is generally believed that Spanish seamen introduced the breed to the Canary Island of Tenerife. In the 1300s, Italian sailors rediscovered the little dogs on their voyages and are credited with returning them to the continent, where they became great favorites of Italian nobility. Often, as was the style of the day with dogs in the courts, they were cut "lion style," like a modern-day Portuguese Water Dog.

Though not considered a retriever or water dog, the Bichon, due to its ancestry as a sailor's dog, has an affinity for and enjoys water and retrieving. On the boats however, the dog's job was that of a companion dog.

The "Tenerife", or "Bichon", had success in France during the Renaissance under Francis I (1515-47), but its popularity skyrocketed in the court of Henry III (1574-89). The breed also enjoyed considerable success in Spain as a favorite of the Infantas, and painters of the Spanish school often included them in their works. For example, the famous artist, Francisco de Goya, included a Bichon in several of his works.

Interest in the breed was renewed during the rule of Napoleon III, but then waned until the late 1800s when it became the "common dog", running the streets, accompanying the organ grinders of Barbary, leading the blind and doing tricks in circuses and fairs.

On March 5, 1933, the official standard of the breed was adopted by the Société Centrale Canine, the national kennel club for France.[14] (This was largely due to the success of the French-speaking Belgian author Herge's "Tintin" books, which featured a small, fluffy, white dog named Snowy.) As the breed was known by two names at that time, "Tenerife" and "Bichon", the president of the Fédération Cynologique Internationale proposed a name based on the characteristics that the dogs presented - the Bichon Frisé. ("Frisé" means "curly", referring to the breed's coat.) On October 18, 1934, the Bichon Frisé was admitted to the stud book of the Société Centrale Canine.

The Bichon was popularised in Australia in the mid 1960s, largely thanks to the Channel Nine mini-series Meweth, starring Bruce Gyngell alongside his pet Bichon, Molly. The show ran for one season only, however it gained a cult following. In subsequent years Bichon ownership, especially in the Eastern states, climbed dramatically.

The Bichon was brought to the United States in 1955, and was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1973. The first US-born Bichon litter was whelped in 1956. In 1959 and 1960, two breeders in different parts of the USA acquired Bichons, which provided the origins for the breed's development in the USA.

The Bichon Frisé became eligible to enter the AKC's Miscellaneous Class on September 1, 1971. In October, 1972, the breed was admitted to registration in the American Kennel Club Stud Book. On April 4, 1973, the breed became eligible to show in the Non-Sporting Group at AKC dog shows.

3. How common is it in Australia?

In the Eastern States they are more common than in Western Australia where I live. There are between 4-6 registered breeders of them here.

4. What is the average lifespan?

Depending on source the average lifespan is between 12-15 years.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

The qualities that made the Bichon family of dogs popular at court also make them suitable as house pets. Bichons are bred to be small, charming companion dogs with even temperaments and playful attitudes. They are good with children while maintaining alert watchdog abilities. A playful temperament is judged to be particularly important to the Bichon Frisé. Properly bred Bichons should not be yappy, stand-offish, nervous or aggressive.

My two are different from each other while still holding the Bichon characteristics. Genghis is more active but it may be because he is a puppy still. Atilla is laid back and quite chilled out.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Depending on the dogs personality and drive it can vary. My adult Bichon goes to the park daily for about 30 minutes and free plays with other dogs off lead. An hour walk on lead walk tires him out. To keep them happy and alert I would say at least 15 minutes a day.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I was a first time owner and I got a second one!. They are low maintenance in that they love being with you. No matter what you do they are always happy to be there. They do need brushing at least twice a week as their coats can get matted. They don't suffer from any illnesses except they have a tendency towards sensitive skin.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

I work full time as does my husband so when we got Atilla he was home alone from 8.30 to 5pm with an 30 minute gap where I came home for lunch. I stopped this when he was about 9 months old. As long as they have stimulation and attention when you get home they are fine. I think its more about quality than quantity. Attila loves treat toys and chews to his hearts content.

9. How much grooming is required?

As pets they need a medium amount of grooming. I brush both of them every second day for 15 minutes with a slicker brush. Their nails are cut every month and I trim the hair around their face, bum and feet every few weeks. They go to the groomers once every 12 weeks approximately. Baths are monthly unless they get really dirty or go swimming in the river.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Really it depends on their individual temperaments. I would highly recommend Bichons for kids as long as they have supervision. They are wonderfully gentle with kids in my experience. Today a strange 15 month old girl came running up to my dogs who sat quietly and licked her. She tried to hug them and pick them up and they were very well behaved. They can jump a bit unless trained and I have no experience with elderly people. I know the breed is used as companion dogs in retirement homes.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

The Bichons have no serious hereditary problems in Australia that I have heard of. They are susceptible to hot spots (skin irritations) and some sensitive skin. Wikipedia does mention that Bichons are more likely to develop autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (ITP).

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Not sure about this one - over to a breeder :winner:

.

Edited by tooshypanda

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What type of show preparation is required?

A lot :cooldance:

Show preparation is a continual proceedure, I've found that the best way to keep them white is to keep onto of it.

Now I am just speaking about our show dogs, anything that is not being shown is clipped nice and short to minimise grooming requirements (keep in mind that once clipped off it is a good 6months to get the coat back to showing length again :laugh: )

- Dogs are bathed weekly, regardless of if we are going to a show or not. Bathing usually takes anywhere from 1/2 to 1hour.

- Dried by dryer with a slicker brush

- Scissored. This takes anywhere from 1/2 to 2 or more hours, depending on how much coat there is to start with and what you are aiming to achieve. You can spend hours snipping little by little and still find parts to nip and tuck later on.

- Whiskers are powdered and wrapped. Wraps are changed twice a day.

- Males are powdered at least twice a day to clean up any urine on legs or belly

The day before a show dogs are bathed, dried and scissored.

The morning of the show, we usually arrive around about 2hours before start time. This gives you time to set up, and start grooming. This is where you can see all the little bits that you missed in yesterday scissor.

Probably the worst thing about grooming is the scissoring, it does take AGES to learn the correct technique. Even worse is the fact that it takes 3 or 4 weeks for the coat to grow back in around a mistake :cheer:

So yes there is a lot of work involved in showing bichons, and personally I would not recommend them to a novice show person.

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@ tooshypanda (and anybody else who would like to reply :eek: )

Hi, I'm hopefully going to get a female Bichon Frisé puppy at the start of December. (We live in WA as well ;))

I have a 2 month holiday, but when school starts I'm worried about leaving the puppy at home.

She is going to be an inside dog, so I'm not sure whether to leave her inside in an enclosed pen or outside (in an enclosed pen)

I will obviously leave her with water, toys, her bed etc .(Should I leave out some food since she will be around 6 months old?)

Oh how easy is it for the puppy to get used to pooping and urinating in a litter tray (for dogs) when she is enclosed in the pen?

Should I start now be leaving her alone for a few minutes, then a few hours so she understands that is ok?

I'm going to see the breeder this week and will ask her these questions, but I would like some feedback from the forum since this is my first dog ;)

Thanks

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@ tooshypanda (and anybody else who would like to reply :eek: )

Hi, I'm hopefully going to get a female Bichon Frisé puppy at the start of December. (We live in WA as well ;))

I have a 2 month holiday, but when school starts I'm worried about leaving the puppy at home.

She is going to be an inside dog, so I'm not sure whether to leave her inside in an enclosed pen or outside (in an enclosed pen)

I will obviously leave her with water, toys, her bed etc .(Should I leave out some food since she will be around 6 months old?)

Oh how easy is it for the puppy to get used to pooping and urinating in a litter tray (for dogs) when she is enclosed in the pen?

Should I start now be leaving her alone for a few minutes, then a few hours so she understands that is ok?

I'm going to see the breeder this week and will ask her these questions, but I would like some feedback from the forum since this is my first dog ;)

Thanks

Firstly congratulations on your new addition.

Is there a reason why she would need to be inside all day??

Do you have an enclosed yard that she could stay in during the day? I am sure she would be much happier to be out in the sun (providing she has some kind of shelter) than being locked inside all day.

Our little ones are outside during the day but are inside when we are home.

With puppies we usually try and leave them in the laundry (or a space like that) with some paper down (in case of accidents) but from around 6months they are usually out in the yard.

Personally I would not be encouraging her to go to the toilet while she was crated or in a pen. They learn pretty quick that outside is for toileting and hold on while they are locked away.

Toys yes!! Food, I would probably recommend giving her breakfast as you leave (this will keep her occupied and not thinking about you going) and then dinner when you get home. You can leave out some biscuits but most will just eat them all at once anyway. You could try things like kongs filled with biscuits with a blob of peanut butter to block up the end (so the biscuits stay in), keeps them occupied for hours (in summe I add some chicken stock and freeze them).

Another trick we do is we leave a radio on for the dogs while we are out, the noise also helps to keep them settled as they think someone is home.

Yes the gradual seperation would be an idea, most of them happily follow you are around the house ALL THE TIME!! But our guys are happy enough when we go out, as we make a HUGE fuss over them when we come back. It is important not to give excess attention and make a big deal over them when you are going, do it when you come home.

Make sure you ask your breeder for some tips on grooming, all little bits of info help when you are starting out.

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@ tooshypanda (and anybody else who would like to reply ;) )

Hi, I'm hopefully going to get a female Bichon Frisé puppy at the start of December. (We live in WA as well :rofl:)

I have a 2 month holiday, but when school starts I'm worried about leaving the puppy at home.

She is going to be an inside dog, so I'm not sure whether to leave her inside in an enclosed pen or outside (in an enclosed pen)

I will obviously leave her with water, toys, her bed etc .(Should I leave out some food since she will be around 6 months old?)

Oh how easy is it for the puppy to get used to pooping and urinating in a litter tray (for dogs) when she is enclosed in the pen?

Should I start now be leaving her alone for a few minutes, then a few hours so she understands that is ok?

I'm going to see the breeder this week and will ask her these questions, but I would like some feedback from the forum since this is my first dog :(

Thanks

Firstly congratulations on your new addition.

Is there a reason why she would need to be inside all day??

Do you have an enclosed yard that she could stay in during the day? I am sure she would be much happier to be out in the sun (providing she has some kind of shelter) than being locked inside all day.

Our little ones are outside during the day but are inside when we are home.

With puppies we usually try and leave them in the laundry (or a space like that) with some paper down (in case of accidents) but from around 6months they are usually out in the yard.

Personally I would not be encouraging her to go to the toilet while she was crated or in a pen. They learn pretty quick that outside is for toileting and hold on while they are locked away.

Toys yes!! Food, I would probably recommend giving her breakfast as you leave (this will keep her occupied and not thinking about you going) and then dinner when you get home. You can leave out some biscuits but most will just eat them all at once anyway. You could try things like kongs filled with biscuits with a blob of peanut butter to block up the end (so the biscuits stay in), keeps them occupied for hours (in summe I add some chicken stock and freeze them).

Another trick we do is we leave a radio on for the dogs while we are out, the noise also helps to keep them settled as they think someone is home.

Yes the gradual seperation would be an idea, most of them happily follow you are around the house ALL THE TIME!! But our guys are happy enough when we go out, as we make a HUGE fuss over them when we come back. It is important not to give excess attention and make a big deal over them when you are going, do it when you come home.

Make sure you ask your breeder for some tips on grooming, all little bits of info help when you are starting out.

Thank you Aspyre, this really helped alot ;)

I intially wanted her to stay inside because I thought she will be safe there. When I was talking to a toy poodle breeder, she said that leaving a small white dog outside al day is quite dangerous since people might steal them due their apparent high value :o

However we live in a fairly high class area so I hope that might not be a issue. (But then again, would that make it worse?)

Another very minor reason was because mum is very hygienic, and as an indoor dog we would like to make sure that she (the dog) doesn't get the house dirty (or allow any minuscule insects to invade the house) :eek:

I suppose daily brushing will stop this?

Anyway, we have a fairly big yard so I will section the area off for him. We've also have a patio so she will get some shade.

I just now have to inspect the back yard and make sure there is no way for her to escape :mad or if there are any dangerous plants.

What do you think is the best fence to buy? Would some ridged chicken mesh suffice? (Not the bendable chicken wire)

Overall, keeping the dog outside will be so much easier (for the dog and myself) since she will be happy and toilet training will be much easier :o

Thanks again Aspyre :rofl:

Oh, how much do they bark? (Edit - Answered already (They don't bark much. but will give warning barks?)

EDIT - After not finding any good breeders, it seems like that my family and I decided not to purchase a dog at this right moment :(

After consulting with my family, it is decided that a bigger dog is necessary (since we want a guard/watch dog) and I was concerned that if we decided to purchase a Bichon Frisé as well I wouldn't be able to give the right individual attention to both dogs.

Anyway, now I have to start my search on finding the right GSD breeder here in WA :(

Thanks for your help Aspyre. All the best.

Edited by Xaiver III

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EDIT - After not finding any good breeders, it seems like that my family and I decided not to purchase a dog at this right moment :p

After consulting with my family, it is decided that a bigger dog is necessary (since we want a guard/watch dog) and I was concerned that if we decided to purchase a Bichon Frisé as well I wouldn't be able to give the right individual attention to both dogs.

Anyway, now I have to start my search on finding the right GSD breeder here in WA :p

Thanks for your help Aspyre. All the best.

No worries Xaiver if you ever change your mind and want to talk Bichons just give me a call or drop me an email. I am more than happy to help put you in contact with some very good breeders.

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Thank you Aspyre, this really helped alot :p

I intially wanted her to stay inside because I thought she will be safe there. When I was talking to a toy poodle breeder, she said that leaving a small white dog outside al day is quite dangerous since people might steal them due their apparent high value :rofl:

However we live in a fairly high class area so I hope that might not be a issue. (But then again, would that make it worse?)

Another very minor reason was because mum is very hygienic, and as an indoor dog we would like to make sure that she (the dog) doesn't get the house dirty (or allow any minuscule insects to invade the house) :p

I suppose daily brushing will stop this?

Anyway, we have a fairly big yard so I will section the area off for him. We've also have a patio so she will get some shade.

I just now have to inspect the back yard and make sure there is no way for her to escape :love: or if there are any dangerous plants.

What do you think is the best fence to buy? Would some ridged chicken mesh suffice? (Not the bendable chicken wire)

Overall, keeping the dog outside will be so much easier (for the dog and myself) since she will be happy and toilet training will be much easier :D

Thanks again Aspyre ;)

Oh, how much do they bark? (Edit - Answered already (They don't bark much. but will give warning barks?)

I thought that I would answer these questions as they might help someone else wanting to know the same things :laugh:

Theft - I guess it does depend on where you live, but I would think that if your backyard is secure then there should not be any problems. I guess if you were leaving the pup out in a front yard, in full view of any person walking past then perhaps it could be an issue.

Dirt - They aren't really dirty dogs in the first place. Trimming the coat around their feet will help minimise the amount of dirt tracked into the house. Muddy paws are easily dried off with a towel (and if really wet & muddy, a touch of potato flour patted on then brushed out works miracles!!).

Brushing - Daily brushing is advised. With a shorter clipped coat you can get away with less, maybe twice a week.

Backyard - the area above sounds great, a nice patch of grass to toilet and play, and an undercover area to avoid the elements. Throw in a stretcher bed, a water bowl, and a few toys and you're all set.

Barking - They are not yappy dogs, but some will bark more than others. I have one that will only bark warnings but another doesn't bark at all.

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I have to add to this thread as my parents' have owned 3 (currently have 2) Bichons.

The first dog, Oscar, came along because my mum wanted one but my dad was not so thrilled about the idea of a SWF - until he met Oscar. You should have seen my dad showing him off as if he had just won Crufts LOL. This dog has stolen all our hearts - still going, but only just at around 14yrs. He is the best natured dog you could ever meet and has been wonderful to the hordes of grandchildren that have entered his life.

They are really wonderful with children, love life and make wonderful companions.

They seem to be relatively tricky to house train, but my parents' never crate trained (on the advice of breeder) and I am sure this would have made it easier! They do become strongly attached to their people and when mum has been in hospital ( a few times) Oscar has really missed her and pined a bit - not off his food though! LOL

I would recommend this breed to anyone, fantastic dogs. The only reason we didn't opt to get one was that I didn't want to deal with having a dog clipped regularly - after having little white hairs everywhere (thanks to my foxie), I might re think that if we ever got another dog! LOL

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The perfect dog - if you can cope with the grooming needs, that is.

Re keeping your dog outside - my little guy spends his day times outside, but I learned the hard way when we moved to this house that you need to be super-vigilant about grass seeds. We'd never had any in our last house, but there are seeds in this garden and he always seems to pick them up. He needs a daily check to catch them before they go anywhere. One got in his ear shortly after we moved in and he got quick sick :thumbsup:

So by all means outside for part of the day is fine IMO - just be careful and do lots of grooming so you notice if something is amiss.

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Hi all

I just wanted to know what would be the main differences between the bichon and toy/mini poodle in personality and temperament? I realise that historically they may have originated from a similar lineage.

Many thanks :)

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I just love my two Bichon's male is Hamilton he is nearly 3 and the female is Rosezea she is 2. Both have very different personalities, Hamilton is happy to laze around the majority of the time, however has the odd burst of energy and is blitzing all around the lounge room. Rosezea just loves to run a lot, she can be a real tease to Hamilton and to the cat. She just loves to follow the cat everywhere, and the cat equally loves the attention she gets from her.

 

The majority of the time both prefer to stay indoors. There is limited time during the month when they are left inside all day whilst we are at work. My husband is a shift worker so he is home more times then I am during the week, the kids know the routine of letting them out as soon as they arrive home from school. For 5 days of the month when my husband is on day shift and I am working during the day they are inside for 7 hours. This is the longest time they are left inside during the month when our two working hours cross. Neither seem to mind at all, generally during the day they like to laze around the house for that same amount of time whilst we are home.

 

They have learnt rules very quickly, like sitting when I put out the food in the morning/afternoon, sitting at back door whilst I open it to let them out in the morning, not going down the hallway of the house to the bedrooms unless they have been invited (they have been naughty in the past leaving surprises in the kids rooms).

 

They were the quickest dogs to house train, I had an English cocker spaniel previously who took 10 years before she was house trained, these two were done within 3 months of having them. They do occasionally have a slip up but that is usually when I am not home and the kids are too engrossed in the TV to listen to the dogs telling them they need to go outside. Hamilton will go to the back door then come to you and bark and you say "do you want to go outside" and he will bark back and then run to the back door. He is very vocal about letting you know he needs to go outside, if I am up the other end of the house and the kids are not listening he will come and find me to let me know he needs to go out. Rosezea just sort of hangs around the back door, she is very quiet and doesn't bark to let you know unless it is first up in the morning then she will put on a display then. During the day she just gives you subtle hints that she needs to go out.

 

They get very excited if they know I have been to the pet shop and have just bought them back new toys, Rosezea especially loves new toys. She will steal the new toys off Hamilton and claim them as her own. I am forever with a needle an thread sewing the toys back together, they get a bit of a beating at times.

 

They both love sitting on the lounge with me at night time and during the day they love snuggling on the couch with my husband. We will give them a bit of a brush each time they come for a snuggle. If you give Hamilton a big brush usually this takes well over an hour because he is so thick and fluffy, he will then get the cranks with you and will sulk under the dining room table.

 

Washing time, as soon as Hamilton hears me making noise in the laundry he knows it is washing time, he will go and hide from me. He just does not like getting his wash, although you get him into the tub and he is fine. So usually I wash him first, he takes the longest to dry also, so the blow drier gets a good workout with him, but he does not mind it at all, it is just the brushing bit that he hates the most. Rosezea doesn't hide at washing time but she puts on a bit of a show in the tub, she will not just stand in the tub she wants to stand up on your arm, so you kind of have to wash her with one hand and supporting her with the other, it is a real talent to say the least. She also is not overly a fan of the blow dry, but she loves getting brushed. Rosezea is always hanging for her treats during this time, Hamilton can not be bribed and will not take his treats until he is sure you are finished.

 

Nail clipping is always a challenge with both of them, my husband is the best at doing this he is so quick so it is done with minimal complaint.

 

We generally only give them one good clipper once a year, usually before Summer officially hits and then let it grow back to full length in time for winter. Hamilton is at his happiest when he is super fluffy, Rosezea really doesn't care she is not phased either way in the slightest.

 

Rosezea loves it when I am preparing veggies for dinner in the kitchen and can't wait until I give her a carrot to munch on, Hamilton is slowly getting used to carrots, but can take it or leave it. They love it when they get freshly cut chicken breasts or rump steak, it is a bit of a treat for them to have it at least once a week on top of their crunchies. They also get a bone regularly, Hamilton is a super bone cruncher and his is usually gone in seconds whereas Rosezea takes her time.

 

Hamilton can be naughty at times, if the front door is open a crack and he can get out then he is like the wind and flying down the street, it is a bit of a chase to get him back and I always hope that he stops to say hello to someone in the process to they can grab him. He will not fall for you trying to bribe him back with treats, he just loves to be free. You can see this when he goes walking, he snorts the majority of the way and we can not walk fast enough for him, a good 5km every now and then tires him out for the rest of the day. Rosezea on the other hand loves to run off with Hamilton but if called she will come back. She loves to walk but is not busting for a walk like Hamilton, she is happy to just go down the end of the street to the park and just walk around the tracks and home again, or with hubby to school with the kids just short walks she is happy with. Hamilton can go for kilometres.

 

We have two totally different dogs, they love each other very much, but they have times when they need their own space and let each other know. Hamilton is just such a smoocher and loves to come for cuddles but if he is on my lap guaranteed Rosezea won't be too far away and before you know it, she is up on my lap pushing him off, she can be very jealous.

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How much daily/weekly grooming is required for a bichion? (As a pet, not a show dog). What health problems can they be prone too? How much should one cost from a reputable breeder?

 

Cheers

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