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Troy

Bedlington Terrier

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Troy   

The Bedlington Terrier

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=48 )

Group: Group 2 (Terriers)

General Appearance: A graceful, lithe, muscular dog, with no signs of either weakness or coarseness. Whole head pear or wedge-shaped, and expression in repose mild and gentle.

Characteristics: Spirited and game, full of confidence. An intelligent companion with strong sporting instincts.

Temperament: Good tempered, having an affectionate nature, dignified, not shy or nervous. Mild in repose but full of courage when roused.

Head And Skull: Skull narrow, but deep and rounded; covered with profuse silky top-knot which should be nearly white. Jaw long and tapering. There must be no "stop", the line from occiput to nose end straight and unbroken. Well filled up beneath eye. Close fitting lips, without flew. Nostrils large and well defined.

Eyes: Relatively small and bright. ideal eye has appearance of being triangular. Blues a dark eye; blue and tans have lighter eye with amber lights, livers and sandies a light hazel eye.

Ears: Moderately sized, filbert shaped, set on low, and hanging flat to cheek. Thin and velvety in texture; covered with short fine hair with fringe of whitish silky hair at tip.

Mouth: Teeth large and strong. Scissor bite, i.e. upper teeth closely overlapping the lower teeth and set square to the jaws.

Neck: Long and tapering, deep base with no tendency to throatiness. Springs well up from shoulders, and head carried rather high.

Forequarters: Forelegs straight, wider apart at chest than at feet. Pasterns long and slightly sloping without weakness. Shoulders flat and sloping.

Body: Muscular and markedly flexible. Chest deep and fairly broad. Flat ribbed, deep through brisket which reaches to elbow. Back has natural arch over loin creating a definite tuck-up of underline. Body slightly greater in length than height.

Hindquarters: Muscular and moderate length, arched loin with curved topline immediately above loins. Hindlegs have appearance of being longer than forelegs. Hocks strong and well let down, turning neither in nor out. Moderate turn of stifle.

Feet: Long hare feet with thick and well closed-up pads. Pads sound and free from cracks or horny excrescences.

Tail: Moderate length, thick at root, tapering to a point and gracefully curved. Set on low, never carried over back.

Gait/Movement: Capable of galloping at high speed and have appearance of being able to do so. Action very distinctive, rather mincing, light and springy in slower paces and slight roll when in full stride.

Coat: Very distinctive. Thick and linty, standing well out from skin, but not wiry. A distinct tendency to twist, particularly on head and face.

Colour: Blue, liver, or sandy with or without tan. Darker pigment to be encouraged. Blues and blue and tans must have black noses; liver and sandies must have brown noses.

Sizes: Height: about 41 cms (16 ins) at withers.

This allows for slight variation below in the case of a bitch and above in the case of a dog.

Weight: between 8-10 kg (18-23 lbs).

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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Bob   

Hi All,

It's taken me some time to get around to this (end of year, work commitments, etc.)

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

We acquired our first Bedlington in '97. It was love at first sight. We felt that we had to share this breed with others. Commenced breeding and showing in 00.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Bedlingtons originated in the top end of England and have been named for the town of Bedlington where much of the early breed development occured.

3. How common is it in Australia?

It is not a common dog though probably on a slow increase.

4. What is the average lifespan?

We lost our first dog just short of his 8th birthday due to an hereditary illness which can now be tested for.

We currently have our original bitch (almost 11 and her oldest son, 10 in the middle of next year).

We have had a couple of people contact us for a replacement pup as they had just lost their 18 year olds. It is much more common to hear from people losing 14 - 16 year olds though.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

These dogs are very friendly and loyal. They do however have the typical terrier attitude, they have been described as "among the gamest of the terrier breeds". They are unlikely to go looking for a fight but if one comes their way they will not step aside.

When our first dog was 8 months old a neighbour with a four year old Staffordshire asked if he could bring his dog over for a play. We thought that would be a good idea from a socialisation perspective. The dogs were introduced to each other and all was good for a few minutes. The staffy then thought he should be marking the new territory. He was very quickly put on his back but that is where it stopped and the stop was not due to our intervention.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

We try to give the dogs at least 1/2 hour walk per day and allow plenty of exercise opportunities in the backyard. Having said that the dogs are just as happy to be lying quietly at our feet.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

The Bedlington was the first breed of dog that we had owned as a family. Beasley was very easy to get along with, a good solid temperament and excellent with the kids (8 & 10 at the time).

They do however require a significant amount of time for grooming/maintenance.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Our dogs often spend long periods of time inside the house in small groups, apparently they rest quietly when no-one is at home. We have lost a few books to young pups over the years when we haven't put them (the books) away properly.

9. How much grooming is required?

As mentioned earlier they do require some grooming and this is especially so if you wish to keep them in the typical Bedlington "Show Clip". Grooming requirements are much reduced if you just wish to give them an all over clip, which many people do.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

We have sold pups on to families with very small children and to older people. We have no doubt that some pups may be too much for these people and it is more a matter of selecting a pup with an appropriate temperament for these families. Of course sometimes this means that while a breeder has a litter it may be that there is no pup within the litter that is suitable for such a family. We feel that it is imperative that we get the best fit between family requirements and pups temperament as possible.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

In the late 90's a declaration was made by the ANKC that all Bedlingtons in Australia were affected by Copper Toxicosis (CT) unless tested clear either by liver biopsy, test mating or DNA marker tests. Since that time breeders have developed breeding practices and followed guidelines that SHOULD ensure no further registered Bedlington terrier pups will develop this disease.

There are some other diseases that have been indicated as affecting the breed by PETA however we have not heard any evidence of these problems within Australian bred dogs and only very rarely overseas.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

All Bedlingtons that are used in breeding programs must have been tested for CT, depending on the test used the results should be 1,1, clear or normal. Some breeders use a variety of tests to try to ensure that their breeding dogs are clear of this disease.

Apart from CT the Bedlington terrier seems to be a very healthy breed and we have seen no evidence of HD, ED or Lucating patellas among our dogs.

Our old girl (almost 11) is starting to develop cataracts and we did have one of her mammaries stripped when she was neutered as it was producing mild and blocking up every time she came into season.

We are aware of some dogs that have mild allergies. Some dogs have a tendency to develop hot spots and yeast infections if not properly groomed (ears plucked, hair trimmed from between pads, etc.)

If you would like any further information regarding the Bedlington terrier please visit our website here; http://www.dogs.net.au/wurroit or contact us by e-mail, pm or phone.

Regards,

Edited by Bob

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What is the historic basis for their distinctive clip?

I asked a lady who shows Beddies and she didn't know :laugh: . Their clip really intrigues me and, as it is so unique (akin to the poodle in that way IMO) I figure there must be some reason to it - particularly the pompoms on the ears.

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Koemi   

Are these dogs quite rare in Australia? I've been asking a few breeders about them and no one has emailed me back :laugh: I used to see a trio of them when I was grooming in Western Australia, but have seen one the whole time I've been living in Victoria, and that was at a pet expo with a grooming competition.

Also, I was reading that they are prone to fight with other dogs - but are they alright if you socialise them as a pup? I'm very keen to get one in the next couple of years but would need to take it to work with me and I work with a lot of doggies. (Perhaps not -need- but -want- is the operative word here.)

How hard is it to get one as a pet if you don't intend on showing? Are the breeders worried that they are going to be used in oodle breeding or something? (I would like to show but perhaps not starting with a Beddie LOL... unless I could find a mentor or something.)

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Bob   

Hi Trisven,

Ken Bounden in his book the Bedlington Terrier states;

"The reason, then, for trimming is to present the dog in a smart, business-like manner, minimising the faults and accentuating the virtues. The judge, if he knows his job, will find the faults anyway and not be deceived but no dog is perfect and a well turned out exhibit is boung to create a good impression."

Early preparation of the Bedlington for show was merely a "tidying up process witht eh finger adn thumb plucking out the odd, untidy dead hair."

In the 1880's a Mr A N Dodd "sarcastically registered one of his dogs as Hairdresser" and shortly thereafter "gave up showing his dogs as he was so disgusted with the faking".

Bounden also quotes from Mr Harding Cox (Dogs of Today) who described the dogs of the day as "grotesque fakements" with the head trimming as being "deplorably ugly".

My feelings are that the traditional Bedlington trim was developed for the purposes bolded in the initial quote. This trim would certainly not assist the Bedlington in his working capacity working in heavy undergrowth in frequently inclement weather.

Hi Koemi,

We have sold a number of pups to people in Victoria in the Melbourne and surrounding area though none of them are in show homes. The dog you saw is probably a Piperdene dog (Robyn Bates, Tasmania) which is beautifully prepared and shown by Sarah Hills.

I don't think that breeders are particularly worried about "oodle" or designer breeding though we do know of an "accidental" mating involving a Maltese with the resultant litter advertised as "Bedtesers". We don't know what the outcome for any of those pups has been.

Most Bedlingtons that we know are no more prone to fighting with other dogs than other breeds. A Bedlington should be confident and friendly. He won't look for a fight but neither will he back down from one. Our first Bedlington (at 8 months) took exception to a four year old Staffordshire marking in his territory and had him on his back in very short order, the conflict went no futher than that though. No intervention was needed on our part. We have taken a number of Bedlingtons to obedience and there seems to be a tendency to "buddy" up with the bigger dogs. One young bitch was particularly taken with the Anatolian Shepherd that was going to obedience at the same time. A number of our pups/dogs are happily living with other breeds including Boxers, Border Collies, as well as some smaller breeds.

If there is any futher information you would like don't hesitate to contact me either by PM or e-mail. You might also want to visit our website here, http://www.dogs.net.au/wurroit/ or access by going to the Bedlington terrier breed page on Dogzonline.

Regards,

Edited by Bob

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Hi Trisven,

Ken Bounden in his book the Bedlington Terrier states;

"The reason, then, for trimming is to present the dog in a smart, business-like manner, minimising the faults and accentuating the virtues. The judge, if he knows his job, will find the faults anyway and not be deceived but no dog is perfect and a well turned out exhibit is boung to create a good impression."

Early preparation of the Bedlington for show was merely a "tidying up process witht eh finger adn thumb plucking out the odd, untidy dead hair."

In the 1880's a Mr A N Dodd "sarcastically registered one of his dogs as Hairdresser" and shortly thereafter "gave up showing his dogs as he was so disgusted with the faking".

Bounden also quotes from Mr Harding Cox (Dogs of Today) who described the dogs of the day as "grotesque fakements" with the head trimming as being "deplorably ugly".

My feelings are that the traditional Bedlington trim was developed for the purposes bolded in the initial quote. This trim would certainly not assist the Bedlington in his working capacity working in heavy undergrowth in frequently inclement weather.

So no reason for the ear pom-pom's then? I'm disappointed. I was hoping they would have some unique purpose, like protecting the ear tips from frostbite or something :thumbsup:

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felix   

I have no idea if this is correct, but I found this peace of information: 'The ears are filbert-shaped and have a cartilage at the back which, when pressed upon, push the ear upward until the tip covers the eye (protecting it from dirt and debris when backing out of a hole or burrow)'.

So, it seems that ear poms protect the eyes.

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Bob   

I have heard a couple of similar "ideas". Just tried the cartilage one on three of the girls, it just doesn't seem to be working for me (or the girls).

Regards,

Edited by Bob

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Bob   

Hi All

Just thought that I would add some information on colour and colour inheritance for those interested.

Colours are blue, liver and sandy, with or without tan markings. Dogs with tan markings are known as bi-colour dogs.

Though many of todays Bedlingtons are "white" in appearance "white" is not a Bedlington colour. Indeed the standard states that "darker pigmentation is encouraged".

In regards to inheritance patterns, blue is the dominant colour, then liver, then sandy. A liver or sandy dog cannot carry "blue lines" despite the claims of some breeders. If a dog has the "blue" gene then it will be "blue".

The genetic colour coding for blue dogs may be blue/blue, blue/liver or blue/sandy.

The genetic colour coding for liver dogs may be liver/liver or liver/sandy.

Sandy dogs will be sandy/sandy.

Bi-colour dogs have the genetic coding for tan markings on both strands of DNA.

Regards,

Edited by Bob

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I have to say that the more I see of this breed, the more I like them. :rofl:

How fiery are they these days? I note what you've said about them not necessarily being the instigators of anything Bob but do you tend to have problems with Bedlingtons in a multi dog household or is it more with strange dogs?

How 'trainable' are they?

Edited by poodlefan

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Bob   

Hi Poodlefan,

As with all breeds you do get variation in temperament across the breed and even to some extent within litters. Some dogs today are still quite fiery though many breeders now seem to be breeding for a quieter temperament.

The biggest problems we have had with our pack are when the bitches are in season and competing for a dog. You can get quite nasty bitch fights and you do need to step in and separate in this situation. Generally they are fine again with each other within a short time and it doesn't seem to carry over into "out of season" fights.

In regards to trainability, as with temperament you do have variation in "independence". Even a dog that is generally reliable on recall may "have other things to do right at this time". We have found them to be quite good at basic obedience, we have had one girl complete the normally 8 week obedience course in just over 4. They also enjoy agility and jumps. The girl that was enrolled unexpectedly came into season about half way through the course. It is strongly recommended that they are not allowed off lead unless in a safe, confined area. They are way too quick to catch should something take their attention and require investigation.

Regards,

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Fordogs   

I have always been a lover of this breed since 1961 as a teenager living in the North of England, I used to show Cockers and there were a few Bedlingtons around I loved their grace as they trotted around the ring, their very unique look and of course their beautiful BLUE colour.

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Hi all, not sure if this is appropriate to post here, but there surely can't be many Bedlington breeders out there, and I'm hoping this girl's breeder would want her back -

http://vic.gumtree.com.au/c-Pets-dogs-puppies-Bedlington-Terrier-Pure-Bred-Microchip-Number-90000600005-W0QQAdIdZ347946351

The person who placed the ad may actually be the breeder.

The dog is desexed, up to date with everything & obviously well cared for so maybe it was run on & is now available for a pet home. Phone & check if you are concerned but its the not desexed, matted, filthy, neglected looking ones that state pedigree & make good breeder that are the worrying ads.

This looks a beautiful dog for someone. I love this breed.

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Hi all, not sure if this is appropriate to post here, but there surely can't be many Bedlington breeders out there, and I'm hoping this girl's breeder would want her back -

http://vic.gumtree.com.au/c-Pets-dogs-puppies-Bedlington-Terrier-Pure-Bred-Microchip-Number-90000600005-W0QQAdIdZ347946351

The person who placed the ad may actually be the breeder.

The dog is desexed, up to date with everything & obviously well cared for so maybe it was run on & is now available for a pet home. Phone & check if you are concerned but its the not desexed, matted, filthy, neglected looking ones that state pedigree & make good breeder that are the worrying ads.

This looks a beautiful dog for someone. I love this breed.

Generally if the ad is placed by a breeder it states breeder not owner, but yes, I suppose it's possible. Clearly the dog has been well cared for, I just thought the breeder might want to know she's being on-sold.

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angelsun   

I have two of these that I groom regularly and although I'm not a bad groomer of this breed, because it's not MY breed I probably don't know the finer points...am curious to know if people cheat and use clippers, and if so, what size (I hand scissor the body/legs) and use a #30 on the shaved parts.

Have always struggled a bit with landmarks on the face...angle of the shaving of the cheek and how far down into the neck...any tips would be great cause I seriously get a headache everytime I do one, wanting to be sure it's done correctly and keeps the traditional look in place.

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Couldn't see and not post! Here is my input.

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc) owner of 20 years, got into them through family member who is well respected breeder. Have shown and bred in my younger years.

3. How common is it in Australia? Very uncommon, if I saw one on the street I would definitely stop and ask questions.

4. What is the average lifespan? I would say from my experience 10-15 years.

5. What is the general temperament/personality? Lovely. Males can be a bit more standoffish to other dogs, females tend to be more accepting. Great with kids, very friendly, not yappy.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult? I have found that with an ample yard a walk 3-5 times a week is sufficient.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with? Yes, If taught how to maintain the coat.

9. How much grooming is required? An extensive amount, full brush every day, trimming monthly.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)? Fine with both groups though needs to be taught not to jump up.

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