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unicorn_magic

New Dane Adoption Behaviour Advice

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Guest crazydoglady99   
Guest crazydoglady99

No one is perfect. I have made some pretty ridiculous impulsive decisions too.

Problem is - now you are stuck with her. And you might need to consider giving her her wings before anything goes horribly wrong.

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OSoSwift   

Sadly you may have to make the decision to euthanase her.

That fact her previous owners won't take her back or at the very least help to rehome her AND have rehomed a dog with serious issues speaks volumes.

Personally due to her intense fear and size I would not have her anywhere near my children or animals. I would also not expect rescue to take her.

I would be the one stepping up to make the tough decision.

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Good luck, what a shitty situation. Did you pay cash? I would consider cancelling the payment if it was digital. Those people should not have lied to you about this dog's temperament and they should not get to keep your $ for misleading you into this purchase.

I'm sure she is a lovely dog but from the sounds of it I don't think she is suitable for your (or many others) home environment... :(

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what I don't understand is:

you have another dog, you have 3 kids etc....wouldn't you take your kids and your dog on a walk with the other dog you envisage to adopt, allow for some play and socialisation time to see how they get along or whether there are some issues recognizable?...even a car you would take for a test drive before you buy it... it is not a substitution for the socialisation with the new home, but it will give valuable clues whether to proceed with the adoption or not.

...I also would give a new dog a little bit more time to settle in and adjust to the new environment before I would allow myself a final verdict.

Eta: I worte 'what I understand' ....forgot the 'don't'...

ideally yes, but she was a fair drive away from us, I was too keen and did not want to miss the chance to adopt her and took the owner saying she is ok with kids, cats, dogs and birds without knowing there would be so much timidness.

...but you knew it was a Great Dane and not a toy poodle?...my sympathy for acting like that is pretty limited - that is just irresponsible.

thanks for your help with what to do now. already feeling like crap!

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Whichever trainer you ask tell them you need an honest assessment .if that means this dog will only get her peace when she gets her wings - then so be it . She is definitely NOT a dog for rehoming - you know that . See what qualifications the trainer has -

do NOT be sucked in by someone who offers to fix ANY problem

do NOT be sucked in by impressive websites

do NOT be sucked in by the promise of One session fixes ..Stay WELL AWAY from people like this - what they offer is impossible

Depending on where you are .. I will suggest you phone the folks at K9 PRO - there are none better for honest and down to earth and practical advice/training . CLICK HERE >

No - not Dane specialist - but with so much knowledge...that it hurts my brain imagining it all!!

Edited by persephone

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Danois   

No - you don't make the issue one for rescue as you did not get her through them. Sas has already given advice at the start of this thread and you will be hard pressed to find anyone more experienced in dane rescue than her.

Call in a behaviorist but one experienced with danes. Where are you located?

OK, the owner just rang back and said they will not/can not take her back since they were about to be evicted for having her there in a rental that would not allow a big dog. So... what are we to do? We are on the central coast NSW, I have already sent a message to one dog trainer (John Gatt that I know of here on the coast) but have no reply. Is there another behaviorist anyone can recommend?

The advice so far seems to be I should not keep this dog around my children and pets because of the fear she has shown. I'm worried, but I want the best for the dog. :confused:

You want to call Craig Murray at Premier Dog Training in Sydney - he is the main behaviorist dane rescue uses and he knows his stuff.

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Willem   

what I don't understand is:

you have another dog, you have 3 kids etc....wouldn't you take your kids and your dog on a walk with the other dog you envisage to adopt, allow for some play and socialisation time to see how they get along or whether there are some issues recognizable?...even a car you would take for a test drive before you buy it... it is not a substitution for the socialisation with the new home, but it will give valuable clues whether to proceed with the adoption or not.

...I also would give a new dog a little bit more time to settle in and adjust to the new environment before I would allow myself a final verdict.

Eta: I worte 'what I understand' ....forgot the 'don't'...

ideally yes, but she was a fair drive away from us, I was too keen and did not want to miss the chance to adopt her and took the owner saying she is ok with kids, cats, dogs and birds without knowing there would be so much timidness.

...but you knew it was a Great Dane and not a toy poodle?...my sympathy for acting like that is pretty limited - that is just irresponsible.

thanks for your help with what to do now. already feeling like crap!

I like to call a spade a spade - for you the ship is sailed, but others reading this thread hopefully think twice before they embark on such a journey, and if my comments spare only 1 dog a similar fate they already fulfilled their purpose...

Edited by Willem

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Mrs Niv   

Hi, Im so sorry to hear what has happened xxx

I am current president of Great Dane Rescue NSW. This is prime example of people lying and re-homing a dog that is not suitable. It was probably one that I refused and told the owners to deal with the situation themselves (as in euth it). They think we are wrong and rehome anyway. As a rescue point of view, we cannot take it in for rehab. I only have 2 special needs carers and the other carer recently had a dog like this and it bit her. I am the other special needs carer and at present I am full.

There are a couple of concerning points, number 1 the fear reaction, this is such a hard habit to train them out of. It sounds like the dog was not socialised. I would suggest getting a behaviourist in to see what are the areas that need working on, but to be blunt I have seen this before, I would euthanize it. I am a special needs carer and the ones that actually react on the fear do not make it. You will also going forward have to accommodate for her all the time, like keeping the kids away, making sure that you don't put her in situations where she can react and quiet frankly it is so hard and you can't control everything. I know they are beautiful dogs but when you are dealing with a big dog like this you can't take chances. My hubby has been bitten twice. I am actually sick to death of having people move on problem dogs and us having to hold their paw to pts. It takes a piece of you everytime.

At the end of the day the people should not have rehomed this dog. We have policies in place that stop this with our forms (which we get abused for all the time as they are lengthy), we also have 2 week trials and I personally drive hours, like 12 hour round trips on my weekends to do meet and greets to make sure the dog is a perfect fit. I am sorry you were dealt this. I have contacts for behaviourists if you would like to go that path but it is very hard work, a LOT of money and you have to be prepared that it will not always work out. I emailed you xxx

Kylie

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Danois   

Pet Behaviour Vet may still be up north if you're lucky:

Awesome that a name has been provided but please OP, stick to the names you are given from experienced dane owners. We know who is experienced and good with our breed.

First stop is Craig Murray then K9 Pro.

Don't waste time and money with others.

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No - you don't make the issue one for rescue as you did not get her through them. Sas has already given advice at the start of this thread and you will be hard pressed to find anyone more experienced in dane rescue than her.

Call in a behaviorist but one experienced with danes. Where are you located?

OK, the owner just rang back and said they will not/can not take her back since they were about to be evicted for having her there in a rental that would not allow a big dog. So... what are we to do? We are on the central coast NSW, I have already sent a message to one dog trainer (John Gatt that I know of here on the coast) but have no reply. Is there another behaviorist anyone can recommend?

The advice so far seems to be I should not keep this dog around my children and pets because of the fear she has shown. I'm worried, but I want the best for the dog. :confused:

You want to call Craig Murray at Premier Dog Training in Sydney - he is the main behaviorist dane rescue uses and he knows his stuff.

Taken from the Dane rescue site:

Steve Courtney Steve Courtney

K9 Pro

http://k9pro.com.au

Craig B. Murray

Premier Dog Training

Great Dane Rescue & Re-homing NSW

M: 0408 113 874

www.facebook.com/pages/Premier-DogTraining/210224060991

Nathan Williams Nathan Williams

Dog Behaviour Specialist

www.dogbehaviourspecialist.com.au

http://www.greatdanerescue.com.au/Docs/behaviourist_list.pdf

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Hi, Im so sorry to hear what has happened xxx

I am current president of Great Dane Rescue NSW. This is prime example of people lying and re-homing a dog that is not suitable. It was probably one that I refused and told the owners to deal with the situation themselves (as in euth it). They think we are wrong and rehome anyway. As a rescue point of view, we cannot take it in for rehab. I only have 2 special needs carers and the other carer recently had a dog like this and it bit her. I am the other special needs carer and at present I am full.

There are a couple of concerning points, number 1 the fear reaction, this is such a hard habit to train them out of. It sounds like the dog was not socialised. I would suggest getting a behaviourist in to see what are the areas that need working on, but to be blunt I have seen this before, I would euthanize it. I am a special needs carer and the ones that actually react on the fear do not make it. You will also going forward have to accommodate for her all the time, like keeping the kids away, making sure that you don't put her in situations where she can react and quiet frankly it is so hard and you can't control everything. I know they are beautiful dogs but when you are dealing with a big dog like this you can't take chances. My hubby has been bitten twice. I am actually sick to death of having people move on problem dogs and us having to hold their paw to pts. It takes a piece of you everytime.

At the end of the day the people should not have rehomed this dog. We have policies in place that stop this with our forms (which we get abused for all the time as they are lengthy), we also have 2 week trials and I personally drive hours, like 12 hour round trips on my weekends to do meet and greets to make sure the dog is a perfect fit. I am sorry you were dealt this. I have contacts for behaviourists if you would like to go that path but it is very hard work, a LOT of money and you have to be prepared that it will not always work out. I emailed you xxx

Kylie

By the way - just saw this.

Thanks for such a brutally honest response Kylie!

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Scratch   

I'm sorry you have found yourself in this terrible situation

A large powerful dog with weak nerve and an unstable temperament is never something that should mix with children.

You must take care of your family first. And also your other dog. Please take into consideration the stress this situation will be causing to your existing dog, and the enormous stress that any sort of 'rehabilitation' will have on this adopted dog. And please consider that rehab will be expensive and stressful on you, your family, your dog, and the adopted dog.....and may not ultimately be successful.

It may seem to some as an easy cop out, but I would not hesitate to take the dog off to the vet and free it from it stressful existence.

It will be very hard and you may well second guess yourself. But it is infinitely better than to put your child or your other dog, or dog forbid, some unsuspecting member of the public, back together after the dog lashes out in fear.

None of this is your fault. The dog has been failed in breeding, rearing, and homing well before you stepped in. But love and money and training simply aren't enough in some situations. You, your family and the dogs do not deserve to live on eggshells and have to implement separation strategies. That is not what pet ownership should ever be about.

If you need to for peace of mind, get a professional to assess the dog, but personally I don't think I could ever relax with a dog like this around children, both yours, and others.

Best wishes.

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Pet Behaviour Vet may still be up north if you're lucky:

Awesome that a name has been provided but please OP, stick to the names you are given from experienced dane owners. We know who is experienced and good with our breed.

First stop is Craig Murray then K9 Pro.

Don't waste time and money with others.

With all due respect, I provided some contact details of experienced vet behaviourists who work with all breeds. Craig Murray and K9 Pro may be good with Danes in their capacity as trainers, but they aren't vet behaviourists should one be needed.

Speaking of vets, have you taken the dog to a GP vet, Unicorn Magic? It is worthwhile getting a full physical in case something else may be contributing. Wishing you all the best with your dog. Sounds like a dreadfully tough position to be in. :(

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gillbear   

No - you don't make the issue one for rescue as you did not get her through them. Sas has already given advice at the start of this thread and you will be hard pressed to find anyone more experienced in dane rescue than her.

Call in a behaviorist but one experienced with danes. Where are you located?

OK, the owner just rang back and said they will not/can not take her back since they were about to be evicted for having her there in a rental that would not allow a big dog. So... what are we to do? We are on the central coast NSW, I have already sent a message to one dog trainer (John Gatt that I know of here on the coast) but have no reply. Is there another behaviorist anyone can recommend?

The advice so far seems to be I should not keep this dog around my children and pets because of the fear she has shown. I'm worried, but I want the best for the dog. :confused:

You want to call Craig Murray at Premier Dog Training in Sydney - he is the main behaviorist dane rescue uses and he knows his stuff.

Taken from the Dane rescue site:

Steve Courtney Steve Courtney

K9 Pro

http://k9pro.com.au

Craig B. Murray

Premier Dog Training

Great Dane Rescue & Re-homing NSW

M: 0408 113 874

www.facebook.com/pages/Premier-DogTraining/210224060991

Nathan Williams Nathan Williams

Dog Behaviour Specialist

www.dogbehaviourspecialist.com.au

http://www.greatdanerescue.com.au/Docs/behaviourist_list.pdf

These :thumbsup:

Do not go with John Gatt!! I know he is local but I have seen some of his work :eek:

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*kirty*   

You have been given some great advice from people with a lot of knowledge. I will just say that our first Dane was very timid when we got her at 15mths. She turned out to be the best dog.

If you have the ability to work with her, I would give it a go. As others have said, keep her away from the kiss and dog for now and just let her find her feet. Get her assessed by a professional and take it from there. Best of luck!

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sas   

Pet Behaviour Vet may still be up north if you're lucky: https://www.facebook...553281864854092

Awesome that a name has been provided but please OP, stick to the names you are given from experienced dane owners. We know who is experienced and good with our breed.

First stop is Craig Murray then K9 Pro.

Don't waste time and money with others.

With all due respect, I provided some contact details of experienced vet behaviourists who work with all breeds. Craig Murray and K9 Pro may be good with Danes in their capacity as trainers, but they aren't vet behaviourists should one be needed.

Speaking of vets, have you taken the dog to a GP vet, Unicorn Magic? It is worthwhile getting a full physical in case something else may be contributing. Wishing you all the best with your dog. Sounds like a dreadfully tough position to be in. :(

As past President of Great Dane Rescue, I have worked with Craig Murray for over 10 years, he is not simply an obedience trainer and is where we sent all out problem dogs for rehab when he had the property to facilitate this. Craig often works alongside Vet Behaviourists post consult where medication is often prescribed.

Regardless...this isn't a Chihuahua, this is a giant breed and is potentially dangerous.

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Pet Behaviour Vet may still be up north if you're lucky: https://www.facebook...553281864854092

Awesome that a name has been provided but please OP, stick to the names you are given from experienced dane owners. We know who is experienced and good with our breed.

First stop is Craig Murray then K9 Pro.

Don't waste time and money with others.

With all due respect, I provided some contact details of experienced vet behaviourists who work with all breeds. Craig Murray and K9 Pro may be good with Danes in their capacity as trainers, but they aren't vet behaviourists should one be needed.

Speaking of vets, have you taken the dog to a GP vet, Unicorn Magic? It is worthwhile getting a full physical in case something else may be contributing. Wishing you all the best with your dog. Sounds like a dreadfully tough position to be in. :(

As past President of Great Dane Rescue, I have worked with Craig Murray for over 10 years, he is not simply an obedience trainer and is where we sent all out problem dogs for rehab when he had the property to facilitate this. Craig often works alongside Vet Behaviourists post consult where medication is often prescribed.

Regardless...this isn't a Chihuahua, this is a giant breed and is potentially dangerous.

That's great! My point is that whether you call them a dog trainer or a behavioural trainer or whatever, this field is different to a vet behaviourist. Sometimes training alone is not enough.

I am disheartened by your last statement which suggests to me that you don't think dogs deserve comprehensive treatment unless they are tiny and have less powerful bites. I hope that's a misunderstanding.

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As past President of Great Dane Rescue, I have worked with Craig Murray for over 10 years, he is not simply an obedience trainer and is where we sent all out problem dogs for rehab when he had the property to facilitate this. Craig often works alongside Vet Behaviourists post consult where medication is often prescribed.

Regardless...this isn't a Chihuahua, this is a giant breed and is potentially dangerous.

That's great! My point is that whether you call them a dog trainer or a behavioural trainer or whatever, this field is different to a vet behaviourist. Sometimes training alone is not enough.

I am disheartened by your last statement which suggests to me that you don't think dogs deserve comprehensive treatment unless they are tiny and have less powerful bites. I hope that's a misunderstanding.

I'm pretty sure Sas was just reminding us how giant Danes are. I've only met three in my life - the most recent being one we've got in at the doggy day care at the moment and every time I meet a new one - I'm shocked (all over again) at their size.

"R" - the one at the day care can stand on his back legs and kind of crook his arm / front leg over the fence like he's up there having a chat. When the entire male Golden Retriever does the same thing his front paws barely reach the top of the fence. "R" towers over the picket fence in the holding area too.

Sadly the other day one of the other dogs was picking on the dane and I had to keep the dane separate just because he was the biggest dog there - didn't need to be tyring to pull him off anything if something stated & everyone else was getting along well :( He actually rushed me at the gate on the same day and I hurt myself (not badly) trying to stop him.

I often, half jokingly, say the best thing about owning foxies is that you can pick them up and carry them off when they're being right shits.

Anyhow - not sure how big Unicorns girl is but my point is it's really really easy to forget just how much space they need and take up. When R falls asleep across the gate into the pen you can't get in for love nor money - but have to try and wake him up or use the other gate into the yard :D Add to this crates or runs, beds, other equipment, heck -I don't think you'd fit a dane in the consult room of my last two vets - or even their waiting rooms. And I for one wouldn't like to know what kind of damage they'd do if they turned - I think in this case recommending someone who knows the breed very well and can cater to their sheer size is super important.

But that's just my take on Sas's comment :)

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