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Troy

Dutch Shepherd

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Troy   

The Dutch Shepherd

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/Breed_Details.aspx?bid=233 )

Group: Group 5 (Working Dogs)

History: Originally the main function of the Dutch Shepherd Dog was that of a shepherd’s dog in the countryside. From early times, the Dutch had an arable culture that was, among other things, maintained by flocks of sheep. The dogs had to keep the flocks away from crops, which they did by patrolling the borders of the road and the fields. They also accompanied the flocks on their way to the common meadows, markets and ports.

At the farm, they kept the hens from the kitchen garden; they herded the cows together for milking and pulled the milk carts. They also alerted the farmers if strangers entered the farmyard. Around 1900, sheep flocks had for the greater part disappeared in the Netherlands. The versatile skills of the Dutch Shepherd Dog made him suitable for dog training, which was then starting to become popular. Thus he started on a new career as a police dog, as a search and tracking dog and as a guide dog for the blind. He is however, still capable of herding sheep. The breed’s first standard dates from 12 June 1898.

General Appearance: A medium sized, middle weighted, well-muscled dog of powerful and well-balanced structure. A dog with lots of endurance, a lively temperament and an intelligent expression. Depending on the coat the breed is distinguished in the following varieties; short, long and wire haired.

Important proportions: The length of the body (from point of shoulder to point of buttock) exceeds the height at the withers at a ratio of 10.9 as suits a trotting dog.

The proportion of the length of the skull to the muzzle is 1.1

Temperament: Very loyal and reliable, always alert, watchful, active, independent, with persistence, intelligence, prepared to be obedient and gifted with true shepherding temperament, The Dutch Shepherd Dog works willingly together with its owner and deals independently with any task which is assigned to him.

When herding larger flocks he must have the capacity to work together with several other dogs.

Head And Skull: In good proportion to the body. Seen from above and in profile it is wedge-shaped. Its shape is rather elongated, without wrinkles; dry, with flat cheeks and no pronounced cheekbones. Because of the coat, the head of the wirehaired variety appears to be more square, but this is an illusion.

Skull: Flat.

Stop: Slight, though clearly present.

Nose: Black.

Muzzle: Slightly longer than the flat forehead. Bridge of the muzzle straight and parallel to the top line of the cranial region.

Lips: Tight and well pigmented.

Eyes: Dark coloured and medium sized. The eyes are almond shaped and slightly oblique. The eyes should not be set too wide and should not protrude.

Ears: Medium sized. When the dog is alert, the ears are carried high and erect.

Mouth: Scissor bite, strong, regular and complete.

Neck: Not too short, dry, without folds and gradually flowing into the body.

Forequarters: The forelegs are powerful, of good length, well muscled. The bone is solid but not heavy. Always generally showing a straight line, but with sufficient suppleness of pastern.

Shoulders: Shoulder-blades well joined to the body and well sloping.

Upper arm: Approximately equal length to the shoulder blades and well angulated with the connecting bones.

Elbow: Well attached.

Body: Firm but not coarse.

Top line: There is a smooth, gentle transition from the neck to the top line of the body, in which head and neck are carried in natural pose.

Back: Straight and firm.

Loin: Firm, neither long nor narrow.

Croup: Slightly sloping, not short.

Underline and belly: Slight tuck up.

Chest: Deep and long enough, not narrow, ribs slightly sprung.

Fore chest: Fairly well developed.

Hindquarters: The hind legs are powerful and well muscled. The bone is solid but never heavy. Not excessively angulated.

Thigh and lower thigh: Of approximately equal length.

Hock: Perpendicular below the point of buttock.

Dewclaws: None present

Feet: Oval. Well knit, toes arched. Black nails and elastic dark pads.

Tail: At rest, hanging straight down or with a slight curve. Reaches to the hock. In action, carried gracefully upwards, never curled or carried sideways.

Gait/Movement: The Dutch Shepherd Dog is a trotter with free, smooth and supple movement, without exaggerated drive or stride.

Coat: Short Hair: All over the body, quite hard, close-fitting, not too short coat, with woolly undercoat. Ruff, breeches and feathered tail plume must be clearly visible.

Long Hair: All over the body, long, straight well fitting, harsh to touch, without curl or waves and with a woolly undercoat. Distinct ruff and breeches. Tail abundantly coated. Head, ears and feet and also the hind legs below the hocks are short and densely coated. The backsides of the forelegs show a strongly developed coat, shortening in length towards the feet, the so called feathering. No fringes at the ears.

Wire Hair: Dense, harsh tousled coat and a woolly, dense undercoat all over the body except for the head.

The coat should be close.

Upper and lower lip should be well-covered with hair, the whiskers and beard, and two well defined, coarse rough eyebrows that are distinct but not exaggerated.

Furnishings are not soft. The hair on the skull and on the cheeks is less strongly developed. In profile it seems as if the head has a more square appearance. Strongly developed breeches are desirable. Tail is covered all round with hair. The brindle colour may be less pronounced because of the tousled coat. The wire hair coat should be hand plucked on an average twice a year.

Colour: Brindle: The basic colour is golden or silver. Golden can vary from light sand-coloured to chestnut red, The brindle is clearly present all over the body, in the ruff, breeches and tail. Too much black is undesirable. A black mask is preferable.

Heavy white markings on chest or feet is not desirable.

Sizes: Height at the withers;

Dogs: 57-62 cm

Bitches: 55-60 cm

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the functional health and welfare of the dog.

DISQUALIFYING FAULTS:

• Aggressive or overly shy.

• Lack of breed type

• Any dog clearly showing physical or behavioural abnormalities shall be disqualified

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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Can I ask some questions (before anyone has answered, sorry!)

How does the FCI dutchie temperament compare to that of a FCI working line mally?

How different are the FCI and KNPV dutchie temperaments?

Are the sizes quoted in the standard typical of dutchies? I've seen some photos of huge ones, definitely over 55 - 60cm.

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artur   
[

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Ausczylwik Kennel in Queensland (Artur) has imported the first Dutch Shepherds to Australia. Ausczylwik kennels imported three boys and two females. We rallied to get the breed recognised with the AKNC.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

As stated in the history of Dutch Shepherd above.

3. How common is it in Australia?

Dutch Shepherd is not a common dog in Australia and there are around 4000 registered world wide.

4. What is the average lifespan?

Average lifespan is between 10 and 12 years.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

The dog is confident, loyal and happy to please its owner.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Half hour walk.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Probably not suitable for a first time dog owner as the dog is energetic and quick.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Yes.

9. How much grooming is required?

The ones in Australia a short coat verity and do not require much grooming.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

The dog adapts well to the family as it is very handler focus. It is energetic dog (especially when it is young), it might be little overwhelming for young children.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

There are no known or documented hereditary problems in the breed.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Same as any other puppy. Make sure you have the breeders support etc. Make sure it is a Dutch Shepherd you are buying.

Artur

Edited by artur

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Kavik   
Can I ask some questions (before anyone has answered, sorry!)

How does the FCI dutchie temperament compare to that of a FCI working line mally?

How different are the FCI and KNPV dutchie temperaments?

Are the sizes quoted in the standard typical of dutchies? I've seen some photos of huge ones, definitely over 55 - 60cm.

Very good questions. The second one re FCI and KNPV is complicated and messy :D If you go to www.specialistcanines.com you will get plenty on that subject.

The size question also baffles me - the pics I've seen and conversations I've had with Dutchie people suggest they are much bigger than this. Kaos is 57cms, I seriously doubt a Dutchie would be that small!

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artur   

Pictures of Dutch Shepherds can be seen on our website www.ausczylwik.com.au :D

Artur

Edited by artur

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artur   

The Origination Of The Dutch Shepherd

In the last century you could find many shepherd dogs all over Europe working with the shepherds and the sheep. The shepherds were not very interested in the exterior of the dogs, just their working capacity was important. In times gone by, shepherds and farmers needed a versatile dog.

Let us now take you back to The Netherlands, some time before the 20th century. In order to fertilize the land, the farmers kept sheep, which grazed on the moors. Early morning could see a shepherd collect sheep from the various farms that employed him. Each farm would turn out its own flock, to be added to the collective.

The shepherd was entrusted with their care during the day and returned the sheep to their respective owners in the evening. In order to do this work properly, good dogs, which were versatile, accompanied the shepherd. The dogs needed to be able to herd, goad and guard, and even if necessary defend the flock from predators. They needed to be sturdy, hardy, obedient yet independent and most of all; they needed to be reliable.

A medium sized dog, fiercely loyal to its pack, highly intelligent and independent, yet totally trustworthy and reliable. It's coat is black with streaks of grey or gold, big enough to ward off any predators, yet light enough to be carried on the shepherd's shoulders if necessary. Hardy and weatherproof, erect ears, intelligent, alert eyes. This was a true working dog, on which the shepherd relied for his livelihood, his safety and companionship.

Artur

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Very good questions. The second one re FCI and KNPV is complicated and messy :D If you go to www.specialistcanines.com you will get plenty on that subject.

The size question also baffles me - the pics I've seen and conversations I've had with Dutchie people suggest they are much bigger than this. Kaos is 57cms, I seriously doubt a Dutchie would be that small!

Yeah, I understand the KNPV vs FCI thing is a bit of a contentious subject! And I'm honestly not interested in the debate about which is the "real" dutchie or which is "better" or whether a dog "should" have FCI papers. But was just hoping to get some answers on the typical differences in temperament between the two types, and which type of jobs the types are typically better suited to. Is either type typically more social with strange dogs & people? Is either type typically higher in prey drive? Do either type typically have stronger nerves? Better hips or elbows? Sharper temperament? etc etc.

Still interested in the size question too!

And am also still very interested in the different in temperament between the FCI mally and dutchie. From Artur's description his dutchies sound far calmer and less prey driven than my girl (a FCI/KNPV line mally) - since she would not cope very happily with merely a half hour walk per day? And probably wouldn't be ideal for a house with little kids, either?

Edited by Staranais

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Nekhbet   

from what I hear they're more civil then prey but similar to mals ... some say better :) would like a dutchie to try out one day

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from what I hear they're more civil then prey but similar to mals ... some say better :) would like a dutchie to try out one day

Do you mean "more civil" as in less social & not overly trustworthy around strangers, or as in the dog is social/friendly to neutral with strangers but can bring real aggression to the table when required to do so?

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cramet   

when talking about civil work it normaly means the fight the dog brings

then there is different forms of civil depending on what drives the dog mainly works in

i hope some of the working guys/gals can chime in and take this further for you

because i suck at discribing a dogs behaviors

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when talking about civil work it normaly means the fight the dog brings

then there is different forms of civil depending on what drives the dog mainly works in

i hope some of the working guys/gals can chime in and take this further for you

because i suck at discribing a dogs behaviors

Thanks Nath. It is hard to talk behaviour, I find that different people will often use the same terms to mean different things! But am I understanding it right that you are meaning, dutchies tend to be just as stable & friendly in public as a nice mally would be, but are lower prey drive & more "serious" when they do bite work?

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cramet   

dutchies are like any dog there drives could be any balance but it also depends on what u pick and how u bring them up and what there lines are is to how serious they are like the malis pick the right lines and bingo

i found the fci ones are like a stronge mali except calmer in the head when they work

not sure about there home life

but i would liked to have had more time with them to make a proper opinion

i havnt worked a KNPV dutchie yet so its hard to judge the 2 yet

but its on my to do list

once i get some more time up with both types i will be able to tell u more

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Artur has some great Youtube clips of his dogs on a thread here on DOL, what a great breed, he has done a very good job with his especially. I would be a convert but they have hair! :)

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Look forward to hearing what you find out! Not that I'm looking at getting one anytime soon - my hands are quite full enough right now - just nice to learn more.

I do think the mallies are a nicer size, though (my girl is fun size!) :)

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Nekhbet   

I'll just have to buy one and let everyone know how it goes ... oh damn :laugh:

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nickojoy   
How different are the FCI and KNPV dutchie temperaments?

I don't think they would have the stats for the FCI and KNVP only because in 2009 there still was only a hand full competing in Belguim and France. There is still so much work to be done with these breed and ensure it doesn't end up in the wrong hands to RUIN and ensure quality is achieved.

There is no quality ones here 'yet' in Australia, and still there is the problem of importing with 'fake' pedigree's behind them. People can pay in Belguim for their titles so you if anyone is thinking of getting one, ensure you know someone over in Europe that has been around the rings for many years to ensure there is no 'fake pedigree'.

We have working Mals in Oz that have either been imported or their Semen has been that have alot of fakes, this has occured in the last 24 months, this is experienced people not doing thier research with the correct breeders :laugh:

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i havnt worked a KNPV dutchie yet so its hard to judge the 2 yet

I have found the KNPV line dutchies and malinois to be a lot more civil than there FCI line counterparts.

'fake pedigree'.

It is impossible to get a Belgian Malinois or Dutch Shepherd with FCI pedigree papers which aren't fake.

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Red Fox   
i havnt worked a KNPV dutchie yet so its hard to judge the 2 yet

I have found the KNPV line dutchies and malinois to be a lot more civil than there FCI line counterparts.

'fake pedigree'.

It is impossible to get a Belgian Malinois or Dutch Shepherd with FCI pedigree papers which aren't fake.

Can you elaborate on this please?

nickojoy- why do you say:

There is no quality ones here 'yet' in Australia

Just curious..

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SK maybe PM Artur he has the Dutch Sheps and I believe he was heavily involved in their recognition here in Australia.

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