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Pip's mum

How to desensitise my puppy to other creatures or noises?

7 posts in this topic

Hello again :-)

 

Our backyard backs onto a reserve, so there're always some rustlings in the bush, possums on the tree, or wondering neighbour cat.

My 8 month old border collie (male) doesn't bark excessively, but when he's outside, he would sometimes bark at these, mostly at dusk.

He would stop if we tell him (by saying 'No'), but sometimes will start again when we go back inside.

 

It is currently not a big problem, just a bit annoying.

 

I would appreciate any idea on how to train him to ignore these noises.

 

Thank you.

 

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YouTube sound playlists :) damned near every sound imaginable is on there somewhere 

 

start it off so quiet they barely notice and reward calm behaviours. Slowly building the sound up, so the puppy never reacts more than a curious look around. 

 

Some people feed dinner whole the sounds go on. I like to play games or have a couch cuddle. 

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This could be good for Pandi,   she reacts with way too  much barking  when little kiddies come over & play, 

I have just been putting her leash on to calm her down.

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Tassie   

Worth trying the sound playlists.   given your situation next to a reserve, I think I would be treating this a little bit differently, and at least while your boy is oung, try thanking him for letting you know, investigating with him, and verbally and with your body language telling him that it's OK .. not his problem.  Then maybe doing a little bit of training with him .. sit,, stand drop, chase you .. that sort of thing .. for rewards ... then maybe giving him a frozen Kong or something to occupy him.   I have a 9 month old girl here, first major barker I've had, and it's the tactic I'm trying with her .  It's hard for dogs to understand what "No" means .. and also, there may be times when you actually want him to alert you to anything odd goin on at the fence or on the reserve.

 

If you can be out there while the noises keep going, that would be ideal, then you can reward him for making the choice of not barking.

 

Consider that if he's out in the yard, he will likely feel that it's his responsibility to deal with any possible problems.   By you paying attention and thanking him for the alert, you are then taking over that responsibility.

 

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ness   

Is he allowed inside? Maybe only supervised outside time when you can be there to actively prevent to much barking. My girls aren't outside at that time unless I go out because of wildlife. We have possums which they would bark at if given half a chance.

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JulesP   

As i walk through my local reserve every dog that lives backing on to the reserve barks its head off. Houses backing on to reserves and sporting fields (and corner blocks) are on my 'don't buy' list as iI know barking would happen and t would drive me nuts. Which doesn't really help you! Mine do come in at dusk as well so as others have suggested maybe just do that. 

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KobiD   
On 12/12/2017 at 12:37 PM, Tassie said:

Worth trying the sound playlists.   given your situation next to a reserve, I think I would be treating this a little bit differently, and at least while your boy is oung, try thanking him for letting you know, investigating with him, and verbally and with your body language telling him that it's OK .. not his problem.  Then maybe doing a little bit of training with him .. sit,, stand drop, chase you .. that sort of thing .. for rewards ... then maybe giving him a frozen Kong or something to occupy him.   I have a 9 month old girl here, first major barker I've had, and it's the tactic I'm trying with her .  It's hard for dogs to understand what "No" means .. and also, there may be times when you actually want him to alert you to anything odd goin on at the fence or on the reserve.

 

If you can be out there while the noises keep going, that would be ideal, then you can reward him for making the choice of not barking.

 

Consider that if he's out in the yard, he will likely feel that it's his responsibility to deal with any possible problems.   By you paying attention and thanking him for the alert, you are then taking over that responsibility.

 

This is the approach we have taken too. 

 

Our pup has shown a strong defence drive (of territory), where when in our yard she will alert to whatever she perceives to be a threat. It can be noises from the neighbours until she realises if she knows them or not, it can be the neighbours dogs, but more times than not she is keeping the yard safe from birds. It hasn't been trained into her, and outside of the yard on leash she'll walk past them with little fuss (this has been trained), so there is a certain amount of raw instinct at work. 

 

I've found going out to have a look sometimes she'll alert a second time at which I acknowledge. It's also a great opportunity to proof a recall in drive if you're confident that she'll return, so most times I call her back to the house and reward for the recall, and then head out again with her to see what it is. Then onto something else to keep her distracted and engaged. 

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