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Walking, pulling?


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So my 7 month old male Newf is starting to become EXTREMELY hard to walk. I have had a female Great Dane so I am familiar with large breeds, but recently I have grown very frustrated. I have had a trainer, I work on it diligently BUT the issue is first thing in the morning(full of energy and has to poop) and if he gets spooked it becomes a big issue. Last night he was spooked and I slipped in the mud and was pulled while on the ground while using a Duo Harness( he can't back out of it and escape). I have used a buckle collar high up so he can feel the tension when he pulls. I stop and wait for him to turn back. I also had him get spooked while walking with only a collar and he ran so fast I almost fell down.

 

No matter what I use or do I feel like waiting till he's matured and calm its going to cause me to not want to walk him. I do not want to use a prong collar, but I am at my wits end. He is very strong and has a LOT of energy. I walk him 3-4 times a day and have him run around on a long lead in our back yard.

 

Any suggestions???

 

~Nora

 

 

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I worked with Newfy for a few yrs at a big kennel. The young dogs were out in 1/4 acre grass runs with another juvenile to grow up. The only real structured exercise they got was show training. 
Newfy are giant furry wrecking balls when young! 
personally at that age I’d be dialling down the leash walking and ramping up Basic obedience training , trick training, structured play sessions. 
Also try hard to find somewhere to swim your dog. It’s excellent non weight baring exercise and Newfy love it! Keep you dog on a long line until you can trust him not to keep swimming to China! 
Newfy were bred to pull. Their job was to jump into water, often treacherous ocean, and drag the weight of a human through the water to safety. 
Look into structured sports like weight pull, dock diving etc where your dog can learn to focus his natural instincts and ability. 

 

Edited by Scratch
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Scratch,

Yes he loves to swim. Problem is he refuses to get in the car! I wish I could take him swimming again. I did everything I was supposed to, socialized him, trainer etc.. all of a sudden he's AWFUL! I mean he can't even walk past anyone and if they have a dog, forget it.

 

We managed to get him in today, took him out in town around other people etc and he was unruly. Then sat down and would not get back in car. Ive tried ramps, stairs even jumping in the car.

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I agree with Scratch. I’d also add leash-free backyard games and independent exploration of the backyard if possible. Leash-free exploration lets him choose his own pace and direction, which is good for development of muscle and coordination. Games are good for mental and physical development and will make him more attuned to you. Hide and seek games are excellent. Hide a toy or part of his dinner in the backyard and send him to “go find”. Substitute backyard activities for much of his formal walks until you have addressed the pulling issue. He shouldn’t be given too many opportunities to rehearse problematic behaviour.

 

Teaching a dog to heel does not teach it not to pull (when not heeling). I know, because my successful obedience competition dog is naturally a puller. To stop her pulling, I needed to make the tightening leash a cue for stopping or turning back to me. I stopped as soon as the lead tightened and gradually backed up until she turned towards me. Then we went forward again. If she lunged or pulled too hard, we went straight home with her in formal heel position.

 

That’s probably impractical for a dog as large as a Newfie, so I’d suggest working on it as an exercise indoors. Tighten the lead and at the same time use a treat to lure him back towards towards you. As soon as he loosens the lead by stepping towards you, say “Yes!” and give him the treat. Gradually fade the use of the lure until he’s turning towards you when the lead tightens without the lure. Then practice loose-lead walking around the house and yard, firstly without distractions and temptations, and later with increasing distractions and temptations. Don’t forget to practice with differing lead lengths before testing this training on walks.

 

Edited by DogsAndTheMob
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You say you have tried everything?  Have you tried a head halter or a specially designed front attached harness. I always have good success with the SENSE-ible one http://www.softouchconcepts.com/product/sense-ible-harness.  Plus what the others have said above.  Do lots & lots of training in your own back yard with yummy treats.  ALWAYS take yummy treats with you & give generously for good behaviour when out walking...even if it is only a couple of seconds of good behaviour.  Just make sure you are marking (clicker or voice) the exact moment the good behaviour happens. The treat comes second to the marker.

I have a young border collie who is reluctant to get back in the car, probably because he sees it as the end of the fun.  What used to take ten minutes now only takes about a minute & he jumps in.  I throw lots of treats in, or sometimes make a treat trail & if that doesn't work, then I get someone to open the opposite door & call him in a very excited manner...this he can't resist.   Good luck.  It sounds like your boy is going through the teenage stage where he conveniently forgets all his training 

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10 hours ago, MaxMom said:

Scratch,

Yes he loves to swim. Problem is he refuses to get in the car! I wish I could take him swimming again. I did everything I was supposed to, socialized him, trainer etc.. all of a sudden he's AWFUL! I mean he can't even walk past anyone and if they have a dog, forget it.

 

We managed to get him in today, took him out in town around other people etc and he was unruly. Then sat down and would not get back in car. Ive tried ramps, stairs even jumping in the car.

Actually one off the biggest issues is some people do way too much off everything without paying attention to the stress signs the dog is displaying .A trainer is only as good as the trainer & too many cant read a dog .
It sounds like you had the expectations that if i did YTV then all would be good but it sounds like the dog has been pushed way out off its comfort zone & walking out the front door is overwhelming & it has no idea how to behave,react or process the outside world .
Keep in mind your frustration is nothing compared to how the dog feels .
Sounds like you need a behavioural trainer who is actually good to get you back on track .
Whilst young maybe consider a thyroid test

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1 hour ago, Dogsfevr said:

Keep in mind your frustration is nothing compared to how the dog feels .
Sounds like you need a behavioural trainer who is actually good to get you back on track .

Yes. I second this. 

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Thank you everyone, such amazing advice here! I will use all of it and work on his back yard play/training. Yes, definitely need to walk away when frustrated and I completely agree he is testing/teenage phase. I'v been told it will pass, to keep working with him. My female Great Dane was so incredibly docile and easy to work with(she was a leash puller but other than that not problems) she was quick to obey and did not need as much energy release as I have seen with this male Newf.  You all are so helpful! Thank you!!!

 

~Nora

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Does anyone have any ideas on land training I could do that would help him with water rescue/training? He likes me to swim with him and the water is cold here till summer comes back, and I do not own a wet suit, took him to beach yesterday and he won't really swim alone. Are their websites, videos, ideas on land training I could use that would help harness his mental and physical energy?

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On 03/12/2020 at 11:51 PM, MaxMom said:

Does anyone have any ideas on land training I could do that would help him with water rescue/training? He likes me to swim with him and the water is cold here till summer comes back, and I do not own a wet suit, took him to beach yesterday and he won't really swim alone. Are their websites, videos, ideas on land training I could use that would help harness his mental and physical energy?

Contact the Newfoundland club in your state or the main club they will most likely have all the details you need

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