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melzawelza

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Everything posted by melzawelza

  1. The USA has only five states left where greyhound racing is legal and operational. There's no real issue with illegal racing. Imagine the logistics of trying to manage a greyhound track without coming to the attention of the authorities. Much more difficult than setting up a pit in someone's basement.
  2. "Adopt rescue dog" - Petrescue first two links followed by RSPCA "Adopt a dog'- RS first, Petrescue next two "Adopt rescue cat" Petrescue first two links followed by RS "Adopt a cat" - Petrescue is 4th, after RS and CatRescue901 "Rescue dog" first two are Petrescue "Rescue cat" - first two are Petrescue
  3. Interesting! I hear it a lot in the workplace and just dealing with 'the general public' in a pet related role. Many, many people saying they searched Petrescue once deciding they wanted a rescue pet. Not rescue people by any stretch, just ordinary people looking for a new pet. But everyone's experience is different. I'd love to see the study and research you mention! Win the lottery already! :laugh:
  4. I think it's a negative for rescue pets in the overall. Having one, central, Australia-wide listing service that is extremely well known within the general public due to really effective promotion and branding and long standing goes a long way to getting pets adopted. Fractioning off listings in to two separate services and locations doesn't seem to me to be an effective way to get pets seen. Of course people can list with both, but that's just twice the time suck for already resource-thin organisations and I don't really know what the point would be.
  5. All dogs are individuals, so I don't see any reason why two entire breeds of dogs, and all the varied personalities those umbrellas encompass, would be mutually exclusive. It's more a case of finding the right dog within a breed you're after, rather than knocking out whole breeds as unsuitable. Because you're considering adopting as an adult, that makes the process much easier. If you want a Greyhound, seek out a Greyhound with the temperament you need, and just be prepared to be a little patient if needed (or not at all, the first dog you see might be perfect!). Best of luck :)
  6. Totally agree there's always room for improvement, but until TNR is legal and able to be performed by councils and facilities like SDCH, it's almost impossible to achieve the same live release rate as dogs. The vast majority of cats that are killed at SDCH are not able to be rehomed as pets. Without TNR as an option for them, they're limited in their options. I don't think rescues are willing to take a completely unsocialised cat in to their homes, so rescue isn't really a solution.
  7. Yep :) It's always a good idea regardless of the dog.
  8. All dogs are individuals, there is no entire breed that all behaves the same way. Prey drive is a natural and normal instinct in dogs as a species. Some individuals will have very high prey drive, some low to non existent, and some that will come out only when left unsupervised and situations escalate. Your dogs must be separated from your cats when you aren't home, or you are likely to end up with a dead cat one day, given what you have described. I have a dog that is excellent with my cats, but she has a high prey drive. She's never given me cause for concern that she would hurt my cats,
  9. If we're talking about the same place, there was photographs posted last night of a Neapolitan Mastiff that has been kennelled for EIGHT YEARS. She is nine years old. This is *completely* unacceptable and an absolute disgrace. A 1yo purebred dog (of a fairly uncommon breed!) should have been able to be adopted no problems at all in a matter of months. If the dog has significant issues, then behaviour assessment and rehab should have been sought, and if the dog is not adoptable despite that it should have been euthanised. It's horrifying and it's not the only 'shelter' in Sydney that kennel
  10. Yikes, that's scary. Thanks for letting us know. Glad they're all okay.
  11. They don't do much work with rescue because they don't need to - they do the job they are paid to do and don't palm it off to unpaid volunteers in order to keep pets alive. They do both health and behavioral rehab, their live release rate is very high, and their length of stay is short. Rescue is reserved for those few pets who truly need it.
  12. Steve I'd recommend checking out Sydney Dogs and Cats Home in Sydney as far as pounds doing an excellent job. They have very high live release rates, do not place time restrictions on adoptable animals, treat medical and behavioural issues, have a foster care program, run playgroups (despite not having play yards - no excuses!), trial periods on adoptions, well resourced volunteer program and an average length of stay of about 3 or 4 weeks last time I checked. They don't rely on rescue for their stats - they contact rescue when needed for dogs that are truly not coping, but given they do s
  13. If rescues get no benefit from using PetRescue, why do they list with them?
  14. Im not interested in the adjective ethical but I would consider taking a pound dog at around the same level as taking one from a puppy farmer. Both are looking for homes for dogs already here and both could care less about the dogs they have or where they go and both carry higher risks for the new owner. This is not true of *many* pounds.
  15. If I have to engage a trainer or radically change how I live and how my family lives I want to know BEFORE I decide to take the dog and I dont want to take a dog in that needs thousands in health bills or nursing .Sounds terrible I know but that the way it is for me and I dont think Im in the minority. There could be enough good rescuers with good resources its just that this is the focus on how to fix the problem there are other alternatives including the one that Mita just referenced. This entire program came about because it has been decided that private rescue cant double what their con
  16. As I said earlier in the thread, Petrescue are unlikely to be eligible for 99% of animal welfare grants, which require your organisation to be directly caring for animals. It is you, the rescues, who are eligible for such grants. I'm sorry but the idea of PetRescue paying rescue groups for each pet listing is absurd. You are provided a well designed and frequented website that gives major exposure to the pets in your care for free. The cost involved in running that website is huge, and not once has PetRescue ever attempted to charge rescues to use it. You speak as if rescues are doing PetRes
  17. I'm all for it and agree with them 100% that there will never be enough foster homes to ensure all adoptable animals are adopted. The pounds and shelters should be the ones doing the brunt of the work and adoptions, with support from rescue to meet that goal. There's plenty of shoddy rescues out there that will happily palm off a dog with known issues without disclosing. In addition, and the thing that so many don't want to talk about, is there's plenty of rescues with a 'dealbreaker' list as long as my arm that will see them refusing the vast majority of good homes that come their way, lea
  18. So many welfare issues arise when making profit from dogs. This is just one more amongst a myriad of issues in Greyhound racing.
  19. Pretty disgusting that this has been known about for six years with no action taken.
  20. Would you continue to have volunteers doing the heavy lifting while you spend money on lawyers trying to get back something done by another volunteer? I agree that it's nice if people working for charities got paid. But it does start to cause conflicts of interest. Some charities are better at managing the perceived conflicts and actual ones than others. That's when you start to look at the percentage of income (donations) that go to caring for and placing dogs vs that which goes on admin and lawyers. Shel was paid just like everyone else while at PetRescue (barring the start up years
  21. Would you continue to have volunteers doing the heavy lifting while you spend money on lawyers trying to get back something done by another volunteer? I agree that it's nice if people working for charities got paid. But it does start to cause conflicts of interest. Some charities are better at managing the perceived conflicts and actual ones than others. That's when you start to look at the percentage of income (donations) that go to caring for and placing dogs vs that which goes on admin and lawyers. Shel was paid just like everyone else while at PetRescue (barring the start up years
  22. Pet Rescue is not now 'for profit'. Paying staff is not only completely acceptable within a not for profit model, it should be the ultimate goal of the vast majority of charities and not for profits, including animal-related ones. Our work is valuable as all hell and we deserve to be remunerated for it as much as any other job (if not more so). On top of that, if we were all able to dedicate 38 hours per week to it, rather than burning ourselves out trying to fit it in around a full time job that pays our bills, imagine what we could actually achieve.
  23. I've just started the dog behaviour questions and the issue I have is that I can't answer as there's not enough context. Punishing for ignoring recall - depends on context. If I've got an e-collar on a dog that knows what the command means and has had heavy repetition of it in the past, and I'm using it at a low stimulus - yes I would absolutely (assuming legal use in a state that permits it). No e-collar and the dog is far away from me? Nope, because there's no way to effectively punish, and I'm certainly not punishing when the dog comes back to me as that's just going to get the opposite
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