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Outside Puppy


sluggo
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A working breed puppy comes with its own special requirements, including lots of physical and mental stimulation, and would also not be suitable to be left to its own devices outside most of the day with nothing to do. As a child we had kelpies, but lived in a semi-rural area, my mum has also been on the Working Kelpie Council for as along as I can remember. I cannot remember the number of kelpies that we had calls about, they had been left alone in suburban backyards and then people didn't want them any more - as they become highly destructive, they don't tend to be chewers like Staffords, but will dig, bark, pull washing off the line, escape....

so Ben62W you need to think a little more and find out more about the OPs situation before recommending a working breed :thumbsup:

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Ok so go with a boarder collie then lol.

Apart from anything else, the OP says they want a SBT. Yet the OP also says that they don't want dirt, hair or mess when they get said dog.

If they don't want dirt, hair or mess, IMO getting a BORDER COLLIE would be a complete and utter disaster on so many levels. BCs are active and intelligent dogs which cannot and must not be left to languish in a back yard. Walking is not sufficient mental exercise for this breed which is why so many of them are dumped in pounds and shelters once their owners realise just how much work they are to keep stimulated and happy. I lost count of the number of working breeds and mixes which turned up in the Canberra region pounds when we lived there last. Why? I think because Canberra is surrounded by "country" so people see these beautiful breeds - working - and think they would make a great family dog. Then they neglect them by leaving them in the back yard...and wonder why the dog digs/chews/barks/fence-runs/escapes...etc. IMO if a family wishes to add a working breed to their home then they must also be willing and able to include the dog in daily activities and must commit to regular obedience work and perhaps fly-ball or agility too.

Dogs can't just be sat in the back yard...they're living creatures not garden/lawn ornaments. I have to wonder why anyone gets a dog when that dog spends virtually its entire life banished to the yard...where the family never spends much time despite their "best intentions" at the beginning.

People really need to think about what THEY have to offer a potential dog and if it doesn't match that breed's needs, then guess what? Don't get that breed of dog. And a dog isn't for everyone you know. It's not compulsory to have a dog! :thumbsup:

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We have been visited three times now by a little stafford that has been escaping her owners yard, the mans housemate is away house sitting elsewhere and is obviously the main care giver, because since he has been gone she escapes at every chance she gets.

Her owner clearly doesn't let her in the house and she has been left out in the yard alone since the housemate has been gone and she is escaping to find him. She keeps coming back to us because we have called him and then looked after her until she is picked up each time she has showed up and clearly she is craving her human companionship.

You really need to take on board that Staffords and many other breeds cannot be left out alone outside. They are not suited to that lifestyle at all.

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My 2 SBT's would be happy to be inside most of the time. And thats because that's where their family is most of the time. Having said that, they are also happy to have their play time outside. Currently l have 2 stafford blankets across my lap keeping me warm :thumbsup::laugh:

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I wonder where the OP went?

It would be good to hear from them again, just to see if their opinion of the breed has changed now that they've got some very useful and practical info, esp from registered breeders and dedicated owners. :thumbsup:

I'm still here :laugh:

I knew from the get go that SBT are very close to humans and in particular children, and this is one of the reasons it made the shortlist of breeds due to my young children. Like i've been saying all along i do appreciate more knowledgeable folk (in particular breeders) giving 'constructive' feedback and i have come to realise that SBT aren't suited for an outdoor only life. Now we just need to sit down as a family and rethink our plans.

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I wonder where the OP went?

It would be good to hear from them again, just to see if their opinion of the breed has changed now that they've got some very useful and practical info, esp from registered breeders and dedicated owners. :laugh:

I'm still here :(

I knew from the get go that SBT are very close to humans and in particular children, and this is one of the reasons it made the shortlist of breeds due to my young children. Like i've been saying all along i do appreciate more knowledgeable folk (in particular breeders) giving 'constructive' feedback and i have come to realise that SBT aren't suited for an outdoor only life. Now we just need to sit down as a family and rethink our plans.

Good to hear that you are taking comments on board. :thumbsup: I think one of the aims of this board is to educate people as to the realities of dog ownership: the joys and pitfalls. It's excellent to see people asking questions and actually listening to what's being said in response.

I love this breed but they're not for everyone. They are *great* with children which is why they're so popular as family dogs and they're very protective of kids in general. But they do need to be with their family...to put a SBT in the yard and maybe walk it once/twice daily, would upset the average stafford immensely...leading to undesirable behaviours as previously mentioned by a number of posters here.

I hope you do get a SBT and that you integrate it into your family if you are definitely wanting a dog and all that brings with it! Or perhaps wait until the kids are a bit older and can genuinely share in the care of the dog? Or get a second dog well after the first has settled into the family? I think you've got plenty of options here...and please keep asking questions! I've learnt quite a bit on DOL and also a greyhound forum that I used to frequent (don't go there much any more, too little time) by asking questions - yes, even the ones which fall into the category of "really dumb". :rofl:

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I wonder where the OP went?

It would be good to hear from them again, just to see if their opinion of the breed has changed now that they've got some very useful and practical info, esp from registered breeders and dedicated owners. :confused:

I'm still here :)

I knew from the get go that SBT are very close to humans and in particular children, and this is one of the reasons it made the shortlist of breeds due to my young children. Like i've been saying all along i do appreciate more knowledgeable folk (in particular breeders) giving 'constructive' feedback and i have come to realise that SBT aren't suited for an outdoor only life. Now we just need to sit down as a family and rethink our plans.

Fantastic, Sluggo! :rofl:

And if you choose an outdoor only dog, also consider WHAT will be the plan IF he particular puppy you end up with results in issues down the track with being outside (anxiety, destruction, barking and annoying neighbours etc etc) which COULD mean some or all indoor access.. would that be possible IF it had to be? That sorta thing

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Staffords are very human orientated, they are NOT the breed to purchase if you want a dog that lives outside in the back yard.

Staffords denied companionship ( and I include living in the yard full time as that ) quickly become bored, lonely and begin to exhibit unwanted behaviours. This includes barking, digging, fence fighting, mass destruction of your yard and garden and once they work out how to get out of your yard, you can add serial escape artist to the list.

It's not fair on a Stafford to live in a back yard. They like to be indoors with their family at night and to be involved in whatever activities you do during the day.

They are also far easier to train and set your expectations when it comes to the children, if they are in the home and interacting with them from an early age. Having them around the kids inside the home, reduces the excitement that the puppy gets when seeing the children, there will be less jumping, biting and rough play from your pup if it spends time inside with them.

Staffords are very smart and can be quickly house trained, crate trained or taught to lay on their own mat or in their own degignated area.

this is an excellent response... while Staffords are great with children, having small children and a puppy = a lot of work if you want them all to be well balanced. I'd consider a different breed, better still a different type of pet which may be more suitable.

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I love this breed but they're not for everyone. They are *great* with children which is why they're so popular as family dogs and they're very protective of kids in general. But they do need to be with their family...to put a SBT in the yard and maybe walk it once/twice daily, would upset the average stafford immensely...leading to undesirable behaviours as previously mentioned by a number of posters here.

And the saddest thing of all is that it's the dog that pays the price.

If you needed a living example of what happens when a people focussed dog is placed in the wrong home, this dog's story is one. :(

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I have been reading this thread with interest and just thought I'd add another side to the debate. Most here agree that it's not ok to have an "outside only" dog, although they seem to be talking about nights only. So what is the opinion of those particular DOLer's with regard to leaving their dogs at home alone all day (inside or out) - I know there's a few of you out there :rofl: . I exercise my dogs during the day, play games with them during the day and train them during the day. At night they sleep!!! So what's worse -

a)The owner who works full time and their dog's alone all day (inside or out). The only time they spend with their dog is when the dog is sleeping in the house while the owner watches tv or reads a book etc (not actually interacting with their dog).

b) The owner who trains/exercises and plays with their dog (because there's always someone at home) and puts it in a warm kennel/crate at night when the dog is sleeping anyway.

:cheer::laugh: :D

Edited by gsdog2
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a)The owner who works full time and their dog's alone all day (inside or out). The only time they spend with their dog is when the dog is sleeping in the house while the owner watches tv or reads a book etc (not actually interacting with their dog).

My dogs sleep during the day. How do I know? If I go home unexpectedly, I wake them up! They get to walk at 5.45am most days and then crash out after I go to work. They are awake until I go to bed and then they sleep again.

It's not as simple as inside = good and outside = bad. I think what many posters have been saying (I know I did) is that its more challenging to provide for a dog's social needs if its an outside only dog.

I think a lot of dogs enjoy just hanging out with the family. Play is important but down time counts too.

It's a matter of making space in your life for a dog however best suits you. Too many dogs spend their lives as animated garden statues IMO. They deserve better than that.

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It's not as simple as inside = good and outside = bad. I think what many posters have been saying (I know I did) is that its more challenging to provide for a dog's social needs if its an outside only dog.

It's a matter of making space in your life for a dog however best suits you. Too many dogs spend their lives as animated garden statues IMO. They deserve better than that.

I couldn't agree more with the above comments.

"It's not as simple as inside = good and outside = bad" is what I'm getting at. If the OP works at it and makes an effort to spend time with his dog during the day (not only him, but the whole family) why shouldn't it work? Wouldn't that dog have a better quality of life than the poor dog that's left on it's own all day and when the owner comes home yes, they allow the dog inside, but don't play, train or interact with it? Your dogs might sleep all day (keeping in mind they can keep each other company - not the same as an individual dog), but there are plenty that are bored and either bark, or damage property (especially the under 12mth olds) and generally have a very sad and lonely day on their own :hug:

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