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German Shepherd Dog

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Bartok   

We lost our beloved GSD 7wks ago

He was my husbands heart dog and his second GSD to pass

We currently have a 10yr old Lab and a 7yr old Rottie and

we also have foster pups on and off

I was hesitant at first about bringing a new dog into our home

How hearts were heavy etc, but I have found a darling 5mth old male

with a Breeder and am really interested in giving him a home or

another dog

We arent after a 8wk old puppy, something 6-12mths would be good

The dog would be desexed as it would be a family pet and he would go to the park daily etc

I am in Western Sydney

Can anyone offer me suggestions of a good breeder who may be able to help us

Edited by Bartok

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Bringing in another adult dog when you already have two older dogs may not necessarily be a good idea, especially when you will have three dogs - that is, two older dogs to gang up on a younger one. Not a great scenario. Consider a younger puppy.

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Bartok   

Bringing in another adult dog when you already have two older dogs may not necessarily be a good idea, especially when you will have three dogs - that is, two older dogs to gang up on a younger one. Not a great scenario. Consider a younger puppy.

I disagree, I have been doing rescue for 8yrs and had 3 adult male dogs of my owner and a female

My dogs are better with something that is about 5-6mths old. Not tiny pups and I dont want to go through

8wk old puppy stage again.

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I disagree, I have been doing rescue for 8yrs and had 3 adult male dogs of my owner and a female

My dogs are better with something that is about 5-6mths old. Not tiny pups and I dont want to go through

8wk old puppy stage again.

5 to 6 months old may be OK, but I'd be more wary about bringing in an adult dog (more towards the 12 months end of the scale), especially if that dog you bring in has come from a kennel where it is used to competing. The worst scenario for dog fights is when you bring in an adult dog (particularly a female when you have other females) to a pack when it has not grown up in the pack. Depending on personality it may work but it also may not.

If you read many other threads about dog fights on DOL you will see there are many who would agree with me.

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Bartok   

I disagree, I have been doing rescue for 8yrs and had 3 adult male dogs of my owner and a female

My dogs are better with something that is about 5-6mths old. Not tiny pups and I dont want to go through

8wk old puppy stage again.

5 to 6 months old may be OK, but I'd be more wary about bringing in an adult dog (more towards the 12 months end of the scale), especially if that dog you bring in has come from a kennel where it is used to competing. The worst scenario for dog fights is when you bring in an adult dog (particularly a female when you have other females) to a pack when it has not grown up in the pack. Depending on personality it may work but it also may not.

If you read many other threads about dog fights on DOL you will see there are many who would agree with me.

We currently have 2 x foster dogs

6mths and 9mth

So I know what age dog I am after

Once again, i know my pack

I have had hundreds of dogs in my yard over the past 10yrs

I dont need info on dog fights

I was after suggestions for a good GSD breeder

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Bartok, have a look at the GSDL website, www.gsdl.info to see if there are any older pups being advertised. Also contact the League and let them know that you are looking for an older pup, word gets around.

There are a few older animals advertised here on DOL too. If you want any additional info, just PM me.

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NaShAd   

Hi,

I'm after some advise regarding German Shepherds.

I've always owned only labrador and golden retrievers. My dogs have been raised with my kids. The kids are used to dogs also. Kids are 12, 9 and 4.

My ex is now going to get himself a German Shepherd; a four month old puppy apparently. My kids will be visiting him weekly. As I have never owned a German Shepherd, I'm not sure what I can educate the kids about it. What can I teach them regarding behaving with the puppy? I know German Shepherds are guard dogs. Is the puppy likely to view my kids as intruders/strangers?

I have to add, I have no confidence in my ex's skills; with or wihout dogs.

Please advise. I'm worried for the kids.

Thanks.

Edited by NaShAd

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Flaves   

Hi,

I'm after some advise regarding German Shepherds.

I've always owned only labrador and golden retrievers. My dogs have been raised with my kids. The kids are used to dogs also. Kids are 12, 9 and 4.

My ex is now going to get himself a German Shepherd; a four month old puppy apparently. My kids will be visiting him weekly. As I have never owned a German Shepherd, I'm not sure what I can educate the kids about it. What can I teach them regarding behaving with the puppy? I know German Shepherds are guard dogs. Is the puppy likely to view my kids as intruders/strangers?

I have to add, I have no confidence in my ex's skills; with or wihout dogs.

Please advise. I'm worried for the kids.

Thanks.

Why would you feel the need to change how you educate your kids regarding dogs because it is a GSD? :confused: :confused:

If your kids have been raised with dogs, the same thing applies.

The pup will learn that the kids are family so that shouldnt be an issue.

It seems from what you have said maybe it is your ex that needs the educating...not your kids

Yes a GSD can be a guard dog, mine are protective of me and the house, but they welcome friends and family, and have bonded with those they know well.

If you are that worried set some clear rules for your kids and the ex, however i think that if your kids have some knowledge about dogs, and they use that knowledge and the pup has some rules from your ex, they wil probably have a long and happy frienship

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Hi,

I'm after some advise regarding German Shepherds.

I've always owned only labrador and golden retrievers. My dogs have been raised with my kids. The kids are used to dogs also. Kids are 12, 9 and 4.

My ex is now going to get himself a German Shepherd; a four month old puppy apparently. My kids will be visiting him weekly. As I have never owned a German Shepherd, I'm not sure what I can educate the kids about it. What can I teach them regarding behaving with the puppy? I know German Shepherds are guard dogs. Is the puppy likely to view my kids as intruders/strangers?

I have to add, I have no confidence in my ex's skills; with or wihout dogs.

Please advise. I'm worried for the kids.

Thanks.

I too owned Golden Retrievers for many years prior to my first GSD and still Have a Golden and two GSD's. GSD's are NOT a pack aggressive animal, they are great with kids and friends within their pack, they have a high tolorance for rough play and they don't spook easily having a high threshold against reactivity being ideally a hard nerved dog. GSD's are the last breed to snap at a kid for accidentially treading on their tail for example, personally I would trust a GSD with child play and interaction more than other breeds of less stable character.

Some GSD's can be aloof and intolorant of strangers where the guarding aspect surfaces unlike Golden's who are traditionally outgoingly friendly with everyone and love meeting new people, GSD's can be aloof and reserved intitially with people outside of their family and friend pack and wary until they trust them, but befriending a GSD, they don't forget you easily. Your kids raised on a weekly visting basis will be fine with a GSD and the dog will more than likely be anticipating their arrival for some play time with the kids.

They are a big dog and play hard, jumping, chasing and mouthing and need like any dog, adult supervision and training to mould behavioral standards into the dog with child play, but as a guardian breed, their instinct is to guard their own, not turn against them. A GSD would be the last breed I would anticipate turning on a kid or person they have befriended in aggression, their loyality and trustworthiness is generally impeccable in a well bred GSD :)

Edited by PetSitters

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Hey GSD folks,

Firstly I am absolutely smitten with this breed. :o

I've been waiting for it to come along here in breeds 101... I was hoping to troll through and learn a bunch... But no one has said anything yet!.. I'm keen to hear your stories!

Eliminating Faults

"Long outercoat (long, soft, not flat lying top coat with undercoat, feathers on ears and legs, bushy trousers and bushy tail with plume underneath (Langstockhaar).

Long coat (long, soft top coat without undercoat, most parted in middle of back, feathers on ears, legs and tail (Langhaar)"

Really? I had no idea. I love the look of long hair on GSD's and have seen a few pics here and there...

Do they just pop up here and there and go to pet homes?

Or do some breed them purposefully?

I'm sorry if this sounds a ridiculous question... bear with me, I'm new :D

Okami, I might be a bit behind as this may have already been written in someones post (I haven't read all seven/eight pages as yet) but longcoats are now accepted and can be shown and breed surveyed as of 2012 here in Australia. (The longcoat has been accepted in Europe since 2011)

So isn't that GREAT news !!! I can't wait and am trying to teach my boy how to 'show' so as to get him ready for next year.

:D

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Flaves   

http://www.workingdogs.com/lshaw1.htm

this was sent to me by a friend in Canada who owns/breeds shepherds. I find this quite interesting and would be interested in what others think about the written opinions given based on the photos.

They are all great articles - there are a number of them

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angelsun   

Long coats aren't bred for, they just happen. The parents must each carry the gene and then it's a crap shoot. Two years ago, we had a litter with 10 pups and 4 of them were longcoats. It's hard to see them til they are about 6 weeks of age or so, so people sit back and wait to see if they will get one. I giggle at the orders we get..."Long coated sable bitch please, with a good kind nature that is good with kids" .....yup...we can do that! :rofl:

Tilly...great shot....nice topline and good colour! ;)

As for the trotting arguement...there are many trotting breeds out there, but only the GSD is stacked three points. You can however stack a GSD four square like ALL the other breeds and still show the angulation that is required, however many of the dogs fall over because they can't use their own back legs to hold them up like is often the case with the pivot point stand.

As for 'winning where it counts'....that's up to interpretation.....we have far too many so called breed specialist judges in this country. It seems to be labeled as that, you only need to have owned or shown the breed once....(yes, I can list a few with those criteria) It's no different to me than having someone claim to be a 'working dog specialist'.....did they own/breed and successfully show ALL the breeds in group five? if not...they are not a working dog specialist.

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Angelsun,

however many of the dogs fall over because they can't use their own back legs to hold them up

What a devisive statement that is and it is clearly untrue.

Edited by Scales of Justice

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Flaves   
Angelsun,

however many of the dogs fall over because they can't use their own back legs to hold them up

What a devisive statement that is and it is clearly untrue.

I have seem some hocks that make me cringe but i am yet to see a GSD fall over because their back legs cant hold them up

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I have seem some hocks that make me cringe but i am yet to see a GSD fall over because their back legs cant hold them up

After looking at the website Angelsun has advertised on her avatar it seems that her expertise is with German Pinschers.

Edited by Scales of Justice

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Flaves   

As for the trotting arguement...there are many trotting breeds out there, but only the GSD is stacked three points. You can however stack a GSD four square like ALL the other breeds and still show the angulation that is required, however many of the dogs fall over because they can't use their own back legs to hold them up like is often the case with the pivot point stand.

hmm will have to try it out at GSD club and see if i can make some fall over....i mean see some fall over because they cant hold their own weight ;)

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