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Troy

Rottweiler

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Troy   

The Rottweiler

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=173 )

Group: Group 6 (Utility)

General Appearance: The Rottweiler is a medium to large size, stalwart dog, neither heavy nor light and neither leggy or weedy. His correctly proportioned, compact and powerful build leads to the conclusion of great strength, agility and endurance.

Important proportions: The length of the body measured from the point of the sternum (breast-bone) to the ischiatic tuberosity, should not exceed the height at the withers by, at the most, 15%.

Characteristics: Rottweiler breeders aim at a dog of abundant strength, black coated with clearly defined rich tan markings, whose powerful appearance does not lack nobility and which is exceptionally well suited to being a Companion, Service and Working dog.

Temperament: Behaviour and character. Being good natured, placid in basic disposition and fond of children, he is very devoted, obedient, biddable and eager to work. His appearance is natural and rustic, his behaviour self assured, steady and fearless. He reacts to his surroundings with great alertness.

Head And Skull:

Cranial Region:

Of medium length, the skull broad between the ears. Forehead line moderately arched as seen from the side. Occipital bone well developed without being conspicuous.

Stop: Well defined.

Facial Region:

Nose: Well developed, more broad than round with relatively large nostrils, always black.

Muzzle: The foreface should appear neither elongated nor shortened in relation to the cranial region. Straight nasal bridge, broad at base, moderately tapered.

Lips: Black, close fitting, corner of mouth not visible, gums as dark as possible.

Jaw: Upper and lower jaw strong and broad.

Cheeks: Zygomatic arches pronounced.

Skin: Skin on the head overall is tight fitting. When the dog is alert, the forehead may be slightly wrinkled.

Eyes: Of medium size, almond shaped, dark brown in colour. Eyelids close fitting.

Ears: Medium size, pendant, triangular, wide apart, set on high. With the ears laid forward close to the head, the skull appears to be broadened.

Mouth: Teeth strong, complete dentition (42 teeth) with scissor bite, the upper incisors closely overlapping the lower incisors.

Neck: Strong, of fair length, well muscled, slightly arched, clean, free from throatiness, without dewlap.

Forequarters: Seen from the front, the front legs are straight and not placed too closely to each other. The forearm seen from the side, stands straight and vertical. The slope of the shoulder blade is about 45 degrees to the horizontal.

Shoulders: Well laid back

Upper Arm: Close fitting to the body

Forearm: Strongly developed and muscular

Pasterns: Slightly springy, strong , not steep.

Body: Back: Straight, strong, firm.

Loins: Short, strong and deep

Croup: Broad, of medium length, slightly rounded. Neither flat nor falling away.

Chest: Roomy, broad and deep (approximately 50% of the shoulder height) with well developed fore-chest and well sprung ribs.

Belly: Flanks not tucked up.

Hindquarters: Seen from behind, legs straight and not too close together. When standing free, obtuse angles are formed between the dog�s upper thigh and the hip bone, the upper thigh and the lower thigh and the lower thigh and the rear pastern (metartasal).

Upper Thigh: Moderately long, broad and strongly muscled.

Lower Thigh: Long, strong, broadly muscled at top and sinewy.

Hocks: Sturdy, well angulated, not steep.

Feet: Front: Round, tight and well arched; pads hard, nails short, black and strong.

Hind: Slightly longer than the front feet. Toes strong and arched, as tight as front feet.

Tail: Docked: Docked at the first or second joint. Level in extension of the upper line (topline). At ease may be carried down.

Undocked: In natural condition, level in extension of the upper line (topline). At ease may be carried down (hanging).

Gait/Movement: The Rottweiler is a trotting dog. In movement the back remains firm and relatively stable. Movement harmonious, steady, full of energy and unrestricted, with good stride.

Coat: The coat consists of a top coat and an undercoat. The top coat is of medium length, coarse, dense and flat. The undercoat must not show through the top coat. The hair is a little longer on the hind legs.

Colour: Black with clearly defined markings of a rich tan on the cheeks, muzzle, throat, chest and legs, as well as over both eyes and under the base of the tail.

Sizes: Height at withers for males is 61-68 cm (24-26 * ins)

61-62 cm is small

63-64 cm is medium

65-66 cm is large , correct height

67-68 cm is very large

Weight approximately 50 kg (110lbs)

Height at withers for bitches is 56-63 cm (22-25 ins)

56-57 cm is small

58-59 cm is medium height

60-61 cm is large , correct height

62-63 cm is very large

Weight approximately 42 kg (95 lbs)

(Note: Imperial measurements in brackets are approximate only)

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

General Appearance: Light , weedy, leggy appearance. Light in bone and muscle.

Head: Hound type head. Narrow, light, too short, too long or coarse head. Lack of stop or too little stop.

Foreface: Long or pointed muzzle, split nose, Roman nose (convex nasal bridge) or dished faced (concave nasal bridge); aquiline nose, pale or spotted nose (butterfly nose).

Lips: Pendulous, pink or patchy, corner of the lips visible.

Jaws: Narrow lower jaw

Cheeks: Strongly protruding cheeks

Skin: Wrinkles on head.

Ears: Set on low, heavy, long, slack or turned backwards. Flying ears or ears not carried forward symmetrically.

Eyes: Light, deep set. Too full or round eyes. Loose eyelids (showing haw).

Bite: Pincer bite.

Neck: Too long, thin, lacking muscle. Showing dewlap or throat.

Forequarters: Narrow or crooked front legs. Steep shoulder placement. Loose or out at elbow. To long, too short or too straight in upper arm. Weak or steep pasterns. Splayed feet. Too flat or too arched toes. Deformed toes. Light coloured nails.

Body: Too long, too short or too narrow.

Chest: Flat ribbed or barrel shaped. Too narrow behind.

Back: Too long, weak, sway back or roach back.

Croup: Too sloping, too short, too flat or too long.

Hindquarters: Flat thighs, hocks too close, cow hocks or barrel hocks. Joints with too little or too much angulation. Dewclaws.

Tail: Set on too high or too low.

Coat: Soft, too short or long. Wavy coat, lack of undercoat.

Colour: Markings of incorrect colour, not clearly defined. Markings which are too spread out.

DISQUALIFYING FAULTS:

General: Distinct reversal of sexual type, ie. feminine dogs or masculine bitches.

Behaviour: Anxious, shy, cowardly, gun-shy, vicious, excessively suspicious, nervous animals.

Eyes: Entropian, ectropian, yellow eyes, different coloured eyes.

Teeth: Overshot or undershot bite, wry mouth. Missing incisors, canines, premolars or molars.

Tail: In the case of an undocked Rottweiler a kink tail, ring tail or a tail with strong lateral deviation.

Coat Texture: Definitely long or wavy coat.

Coat Colour: Dogs that do not show the typical Rottweiler colouring of black with tan markings. White markings.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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I wanted to ask whether cruciate problems are an issue in the breed. I have a friend who has had 2 rotties and both have done cruciates at an early age despite him second time around being extra cautious with weight etc. Admittedly the first dog was from a byb but the second is from a registered breeder.

I have also met a few other people with rotties who have had similar issues - again not sure whether they were byb or registered.

Also is there a variation in coat as some rotties I have met have quite long thick coats others seem quite smooth.

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Mim   

Would a rottie be bouncing off the walls if it missed a daily walk?

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I wanted to ask whether cruciate problems are an issue in the breed. I have a friend who has had 2 rotties and both have done cruciates at an early age despite him second time around being extra cautious with weight etc. Admittedly the first dog was from a byb but the second is from a registered breeder.

I have also met a few other people with rotties who have had similar issues - again not sure whether they were byb or registered.

Also is there a variation in coat as some rotties I have met have quite long thick coats others seem quite smooth.

Yes there is a high chance of cruciate problems. Mine has just had his done. But I don't think it's any more prevalent in Rotties as it is in larger breeds. Labbies etc have crutiate problems but also many other breeds of dog.

I was cautious with my rottie with weight and exercise but he still did his.

Would a rottie be bouncing off the walls if it missed a daily walk?

It very much depends on the nature of the dog. I had a rottie girl who was very laid back and lazy and a 5 mibute walk around the block was fine.

My boy on the other hand is a bundle of energy and loves his daily walk, then has energy to burn with toys when we get home lol.

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Guest Pandii   
Guest Pandii
Would a rottie be bouncing off the walls if it missed a daily walk?

Depends on the Dog, my Bitch complains if she has to leave the heater. She wont walk if its raining, dark or cold, Sometimes it to dark/cold/raining to even walk tot he car to go for a drive

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I've been involved with the Rottweiler since 1974, as a toddler, when my parents started breeding and showing under the Allerhochst prefix. I began breeding and showing under my own prefix in 1989 at the age of 18.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

The breed is one of the oldest recognised breeds, dating back to Roman times when it was used by the Roman armies to guard the camps and drove cattle. The breed was refined into what we have today in the German city of Rottweil, where it was used primarily as a Butcher's Dog - "Metzgerhund" - performing the functions of droving cattle to market and guarding the days takings in a bag around his neck on the way home. He also became known as a useful draught dog, pulling carts of produce for butchers, bakers, milkmen, etc.

Eventually railroads and draught animals, such as Donkeys, made the Rottweiler's droving and draughting abilities obselete, and the numbers of the breed declined dramatically, until in the early 1900's they became recognised as valuable guard and working dog for the police services.

3. How common is it in Australia?

The breed is pretty common, numbers are not as high as they used to be, but that's not always a bad thing.

4. What is the average lifespan?

8 - 10 years, although I tend to think we are starting to see an improvement in lifespan and I think more and more breeders are starting to factor lifespan into account when choosing breeding combinations.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Confident, loyal, outgoing. Very intelligent. Strong willed and needs to know who his pack leader is, or he will take over that role. Rottweilers are people dogs and love to be where their pack is.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

A good daily walk, and a play in the yard is normally sufficient, particularly if combined with mental stimulation as well.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

No, I don’t recommend the Rottweiler for a first time dog owner. He is a strong willed breed, and will happily walk over any owner who is not confident in his pack leadership abilities.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

I’ll leave this to others, I’ve never had a solo dog. Anecdotally, people who have purchased pups from me as sole dogs have never had a problem with them being alone for long periods.

9. How much grooming is required?

Minimal – a light brush every now and then and a wash if the dog needs it. Ours often only get a bath before a dog show, and they might be 6 months apart.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Due to size and strength, yes most likely. Although they are a breed that loves children and is very good with them, they are also very large and could unintentionally hurt a small child or infirm person.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Hip and elbow displaysia, OCD, entropian and ectropian are particular issues in this country. Although not necessarily hereditary, Rottweilers can also be also prone to bloat and cancer, particularly osteosarcoma.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Ensure you see copies of both parents Hip and Elbow scores – according to the National Rottweiler Council of Australia guidelines, the combined hip score of both parents should be no more than 20. I personally don’t like to see any dog above 10.

Ensure you see the Eye and Mouth certificate for each parent – this is a form, completed by a vet, showing that the parents do not suffer from entropian or ectropian, and that they have correct dentition.

Expect a health guarantee – these vary, but most cover some sort of refund if the dog develops HD, ED, Entropian or Ectropian as a minimum.

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I wanted to ask whether cruciate problems are an issue in the breed. I have a friend who has had 2 rotties and both have done cruciates at an early age despite him second time around being extra cautious with weight etc. Admittedly the first dog was from a byb but the second is from a registered breeder.

I have also met a few other people with rotties who have had similar issues - again not sure whether they were byb or registered.

I've never had a Rottweiler with a cruciate problem, but I do hear of it regularly. It may be that it is an issue in certain bloodlines, or it may be because of the size of the breed, or a combination of both.

Also is there a variation in coat as some rotties I have met have quite long thick coats others seem quite smooth.

There is. The correct coat is smooth and harsh. It is also common to see a heavy "European" coat, which is thicker - but not long - and might have wave through it, but this is not the ideal coat.

Longcoats also pop up every now and then, more commonly in some lines than others. A longcoat is a disqualification fault.

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Would a rottie be bouncing off the walls if it missed a daily walk?

It depends on the line and on the dog :laugh: Some Rottys are happy to laze the day away and won't give a toss if they miss their walk, others will drive you batty if you miss it.

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Mim   

What price range does a pet rottie fall into?

What price range for a show quality rottie?

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How long is a piece of string? :birthday:

I can only answer for myself - our pups are normally around $1,000. We don't charge more for show potential pups, but we do discount if the pup has a major fault such as a white patch or overshot mouth.

I commonly hear of prices up into the $2,500 - $3,500 range.

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Ashli   
What price range does a pet rottie fall into?

What price range for a show quality rottie?

For pet I've heard of prices between $800-1200

And for show I've heard between $1000-1800

Each breeder has their own individual prices, some more, some less than others. Best thing you can do is contact breeders themselves :rofl:

Have never heard of the $2000 and up mark though, sheez aller, do the dogs for that price have special powers? :rofl::laugh:

Edited by Ashli

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Nekhbet   

I'll add a bit about what happens if you dont research your breeder or buy from a backyarder

Diesels website

as with every dog research your rotties especially, HD, ED, allergies are becoming a bit of a problem perpetuated by the unscrupulous out there

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A friend's BYB rottie is about to be given his wings due to acute laryngeal paralysis. Is there a test for this condition in Rottweilers?

They have always had rotties, but not well bred ones from what I can tell. OH has said that if they get another we will give them a steer to a good breeder, but I am not sure what we should be suggesting they ask a registered breeder when it comes to health questions. Advice?

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laneka   

SSM, that is not something I have heard of in Rottweilers. I don't think it is a problem with our breed and is something you would have to ask a vet.

Re health questions to ask, as many as the buyers can think of. Main ones are xrayed hips and elbows and both need to come inside our national breed standard. Which is, an individual must not score more than 20 or a combined pair must not score more than 20. Elbows no more than a score of 3. The lower the better. The ideal is 0 - 1. Eye and dental checks. All of the above have certificates, ask to view these. See both parents if possible. Make sure both have excellent temperaments and also they are housed well. Make sure there is back up from the breeders, most ethical breeders offer this. There are many questions a puppy person can ask but be assured the breeder will ask a lot of questions as well.

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arjay   

moved it to the rotty thread in general discussion.

Edited by arjay

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Shmurps   

I have just printed this out and taking it to work.

I'll add a bit about what happens if you dont research your breeder or buy from a backyarder

Diesels website

as with every dog research your rotties especially, HD, ED, allergies are becoming a bit of a problem perpetuated by the unscrupulous out there

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