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Pretty Miss Emma

Greyhounds

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In Victoria only GAP greyhounds are allowed to be muzzle free. If you adopt a grey from elsewhere you can get them assessed by GAP but, by my understanding, they then become GAP dogs, ie they are issued a number etc same as if you had adopted them first from GAP, you still own them. They have to stay at GAP for several days.

By law no greyhound is allowed off lead except on private property, even GAP greyhounds, even off lead parks.

ETA they must wear their identifying collar when out and about

Is this every state, and does it apply to non-race bred greys? I thought that was the case, but there is a grey in my local dog park that is always off-lead, muzzle-free with no special identification so I wondered if maybe it wasn't.

I'm inner west too and noticed the same thing. Everyone I've asked is under the impression that 'greyhounds don't have to wear muzzles anymore'. But they aren't wearing GAP collars.

:confused:

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Rebanne   

A sighthound can be trained to come when called - it just takes work

and the ability to recognise some should never be let off lead. I've only had one that I considered suitable to let off lead in an unfenced area. And I did train him up but I never lost sight of what he was. I think if I put the effort in I could train up my current boy but as I have easy access to a couple of fully fenced areas there is no real need. But the others I have had, no way would I trust them to come back if they put something up. When they get into that zone, nothing breaks them until they snap out. That's why some break their necks cause they hit a solid object so hard cause they don't even see it. They can even kill themselves by colliding with each other.

BTW all my dogs come back when called, in boring circumstances. Even when accidently let out the front and the gate is open they have responsed to my yelling. We have just been lucky another dog or cat wasn't trotting past the open gate at the time.

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That sounds like a terrier with a strong ratting instinct. They just can't hear you, nothing exists except that rat. Any other boring day they'll happily stick like glue and come when called.

I didn't realise greys could fatally injure themselves. :(

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I've seen a couple of nicely behaved on leash ones getting around here without muzzles on.smile.gif

Edited by Jules❤3Cavs

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CBL   

There is also a difference between letting one off lead with good recall, and a pack situation.

We were going to a regular greyhound meet last year. It was at a fenced dog park and the law in that council region said that greys could be off lead (muzzled). We refused to let our two off, they only got a run if/when there were either only a few or no other dogs in the park. A situation developed where other grey owners would just walk in and take off the leads - resulting in numerous greys tearing around the park chasing other dogs - not something non-grey owners appreciated of course! Many of them had good recall when just wandering around, but the vast majority did not when they were chasing.

We decided not to go anymore, it was an accident waiting to happen. As much as I love greyhounds and think they make awesome pets (we will always have them), but you still need to be responsible for them (just as you do with any other dog).

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Rebanne   

That sounds like a terrier with a strong ratting instinct. They just can't hear you, nothing exists except that rat. Any other boring day they'll happily stick like glue and come when called.

I didn't realise greys could fatally injure themselves. :(

and they don't have to be chasing something to get into the zone. Give them enough room and they are running around seemingly flat out doing zoomies, then, bang! they are in a totally different headspace and and you just cross your fingers and hold your breath they do manage to avoid the tree. I actually prefer to let mine off together at the slipping track, a long boring narrow area, as there is less chance of them splitting up and then coming at each other head on. My greyhound chiro man has told me about greys racing at each other full on and colliding and both dying from a broken neck. One of my boys t-boned my girl and when she got up I thought her leg had been broken. Any wonder I spend a small fortune at the chiro's.

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juice   

I used to see a guy most mornings with his retired greys.

He let them both off and they would toddle behind him .

Often Red would play with my cattle dog chasing him, one day he kinda just changed in an instant, something kicked in ,my cattle knew it and stopped dead still and wouldn't move. :(

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HazyWal   

In Victoria only GAP greyhounds are allowed to be muzzle free. If you adopt a grey from elsewhere you can get them assessed by GAP but, by my understanding, they then become GAP dogs, ie they are issued a number etc same as if you had adopted them first from GAP, you still own them. They have to stay at GAP for several days.

By law no greyhound is allowed off lead except on private property, even GAP greyhounds, even off lead parks.

ETA they must wear their identifying collar when out and about

Is this every state, and does it apply to non-race bred greys? I thought that was the case, but there is a grey in my local dog park that is always off-lead, muzzle-free with no special identification so I wondered if maybe it wasn't.

I'm inner west too and noticed the same thing. Everyone I've asked is under the impression that 'greyhounds don't have to wear muzzles anymore'. But they aren't wearing GAP collars.

:confused:

This is what s**ts me to tears with people that walk their greys muzzle free and tell others they don't have to wear them, most of them DO know the law but don't uphold it which can be a dangerous thing.

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What I have said applies to Victoria, to all greyhounds including show bred. You can exhibit greyhounds at sanctioned events, shows, agility, obedience etc, without a muzzle.

When you say sanctioned do you mean just ANKC or can it be another organisation?

So they can compete but not train offlead? Unless on private land?

Just curious as we have a greyhound starting flyball training and is going great but I've always been curious as too whether he could legally compete or not as flyball isn't an ANKC sport.

No, unless the dog has a green collar, it is not allowed to have a muzzle off at Flyball. Australian ex-racing greyhounds have an unsuitable conformation for flyball. It is very dangerous to get them to U-turn at high speed, and injury will eventually result.

A sighthound can be trained to come when called - it just takes work

A greyhound that has been trained for racing will have been trained to turn on it's natural instinct on certain cues. To train them to recall, you would need to simulate all the cues that they have been trained with and train to overcome them. Most greyhound owners don't even know what the cues are, let alone be able to set up a realistic simulation to work with.

It just takes work, but the work is beyond the capability of many.

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*kirty*   

My girl has a great recall, but I only ever let her off lead in fully fenced areas. Just not worth the risk.

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Sayreovi   

No, unless the dog has a green collar, it is not allowed to have a muzzle off at Flyball. Australian ex-racing greyhounds have an unsuitable conformation for flyball. It is very dangerous to get them to U-turn at high speed, and injury will eventually result.

Haven't paid much attention to collars but they are GAP dogs and go out in public without muzzles.

What makes them have unsuitable conformation? I know they compete overseas, never seen one here and I don't study Greys so wouldn't know what makes Aussie ones different :)

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No, unless the dog has a green collar, it is not allowed to have a muzzle off at Flyball. Australian ex-racing greyhounds have an unsuitable conformation for flyball. It is very dangerous to get them to U-turn at high speed, and injury will eventually result.

Haven't paid much attention to collars but they are GAP dogs and go out in public without muzzles.

What makes them have unsuitable conformation? I know they compete overseas, never seen one here and I don't study Greys so wouldn't know what makes Aussie ones different :)

Racing greyhounds in Australia have been selectively bred for their ability to run fast on a course with only gentle turns. Last time I let my girl off lead she snapped her dew claw in half doing a sharp turn. This is typical of the injuries that can occur at the time, but there is also the damage being done over time to joints and ligaments that were not designed for this repeated action at high speed. The speed and the high prey drive of the greyhound multiplies the stress on the joints, even if their conformation was more rugged. If you look at the bodies of dogs overseas that are selective bred for live coursing or other activities, they are more solidly built to allow for the repeated stress of sharp turns.

There are better things to be doing with a retired greyhound that don't have the potential for so much harm.

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Sayreovi   

No, unless the dog has a green collar, it is not allowed to have a muzzle off at Flyball. Australian ex-racing greyhounds have an unsuitable conformation for flyball. It is very dangerous to get them to U-turn at high speed, and injury will eventually result.

Haven't paid much attention to collars but they are GAP dogs and go out in public without muzzles.

What makes them have unsuitable conformation? I know they compete overseas, never seen one here and I don't study Greys so wouldn't know what makes Aussie ones different :)

Racing greyhounds in Australia have been selectively bred for their ability to run fast on a course with only gentle turns. Last time I let my girl off lead she snapped her dew claw in half doing a sharp turn. This is typical of the injuries that can occur at the time, but there is also the damage being done over time to joints and ligaments that were not designed for this repeated action at high speed. The speed and the high prey drive of the greyhound multiplies the stress on the joints, even if their conformation was more rugged. If you look at the bodies of dogs overseas that are selective bred for live coursing or other activities, they are more solidly built to allow for the repeated stress of sharp turns.

There are better things to be doing with a retired greyhound that don't have the potential for so much harm.

Interesting thanks for the info. He is pretty cruisy and laid back so I don't think he is going to go that fast but I can't exactly say no you can't train because he may or may not get an injury :)

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Interesting thanks for the info. He is pretty cruisy and laid back so I don't think he is going to go that fast but I can't exactly say no you can't train because he may or may not get an injury :)

Only an owner can decide. But owners should be fully informed about the possible consequences for their type of dog if they want to take up a particular dog sport . Breeds vary widely by conformation, and some are much more suited to particular tasks than others. People training others in dog sports have a responsibility to pass on information that handlers should take into account when deciding whether to take up a particular dog sport not.

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Sayreovi   

Interesting thanks for the info. He is pretty cruisy and laid back so I don't think he is going to go that fast but I can't exactly say no you can't train because he may or may not get an injury :)

Only an owner can decide. But owners should be fully informed about the possible consequences for their type of dog if they want to take up a particular dog sport . Breeds vary widely by conformation, and some are much more suited to particular tasks than others. People training others in dog sports have a responsibility to pass on information that handlers should take into account when deciding whether to take up a particular dog sport not.

Yes and I (and owner) am fully aware of the downfalls of a dog his size doing flyball. Not why a greyhound isn't necessarily suitable, hence my question. I have an answer and I will pass that on when I see them next.

What you posted above is blindingly obvious for those who regulary compete in sports and I am all for dogs that are structually suitable doing sports and owners being aware but as a non greyhound person I wasn't aware of why what appears to be a structually sound dog is ill suited.

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Maddy   

HA , i get what you are saying, but the land is boxed in by houses with me standing in front of the entrance, so he couldn't have got past, my street is a quiet dead end too.

I wouldn't do it again, but i just wanted to see him run, he did 2 laps ( 3 acre paddock),and then came and flopped at my feet. :)

You'd be surprised what they can do when they're in that headspace. I'd have a greyhound barge past me (through the garage door) and not only would I not have been able to stop him (not unless I was as wide as the door) but even trying to avoid him as he came past, I got left with some very bad bruises up my leg from where he clipped me. And he was going at a leisurely 20km/h or so- a greyhound doing 60km/h and focused on an actual chase.. you'd not just have no hope in hell of stopping them, you'd likely end up seriously injured if they hit you on the way past.

I've just seen too many accidents to be willing to take those risks with greyhounds. As for recall.. when there is no chase involved, recall can be good. My old boy recalls like a champ when we work in the yard together but if he sees a cat out on a walk, I might as well not exist. That's normal for the breed, they are a sighthound.

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juice   

Point taken.

i wouldn't do it again, bit older and wiser now, i was just curious to see him move.

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