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Staffy and Australia Bulldog


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Hi Guys,

 

Just wondering if there is such a thing of dog breeds who don't get along? 

 

My partner has an Australian miniature bulldog (10mths) and i just brought a blue female Staffy which is 5 weeks old. 

 

The bulldog dog is well trained and I have researched the general introducing dog rules etc. But what I want to know is with the correct training and guidance is there any reason for them not to get along?

 

They will be living together when she is ready/old enough. 

 

Thanks!!

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I'd say there are breed tendencies, and dislike of other dogs is common in bull breeds in general.  But there are plenty of friendly individuals in most if not all bull breeds, as well as many individuals who pick and choose their friends.  

Starting young often helps.

Expect a lot of questions about getting a puppy at five weeks, which is too young, and illegal in many places.  Also, you might want to do a search on blue staffies.  A lot has been said about them on DOL forums.

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Sandgrubber apparently he does not have the puppy yet as the last sentence explains "ready/old enough" but I do agree with you in regard to blue Staffies, same problem with my breed, get more money for the "rare" colour albeit a disqualification or as the ANKC put it now "highly undesirable" same with the Staffy breed I believe.

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Are they both female ? If so might be risky . 

Blue staffys are a health nightmare , hope you have looked at that , sold as rare , but most common colour now .  

Certain breeds are more dominant and both those breeds are renowned for not always being good with other dogs , however maybe fine . Be careful around maturity when they start to flex their muscles . Being a strong leader and setting boundaries is important but breeding  plays a part too .

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Thanks everyone. I pick the girl up at 8 weeks. My breeder does not breed blue to blue rather black to blue so it limits health risks/skin conditions and also conducts all the reg testing. I am not concerned about that part. 

 

Staffy is the girl and bulldog is a boy. 

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The breeder who I presume knows there is another dog in the home should be offering stacks of advice on this topic .They should be a wealth of knowledge on introducing there breed and also ensuring the pup selected has the best temperament to match going to a home with another dog.

Problem is at the age of the pup it’s personality could change again and may not be the best fit but that is something the breeder needs to access and address .

You need to understand the needs of your current pup,it’s training level and should be very aware of how it interacts with other dogs already ,then the right pup selected to minimise any issues with the right training in the household.

Any breeds/crosses can dislike each other the difference in some dogs the issues can be more stronger,more often and a bigger issue 

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my breeder does not breed blue to blue rather black to blue so it limits health risks/skin conditions

Yes avoiding blue to blue matings is a good idea.  But there is still the problem that the blue does not meet the breed standard and if the black dog had a blue parent - you still have a higher risk for problems that go with that colour.   You should be concerned about that part. 

What is "reg testing"?  Have you actually seen any of the documentation?  Maybe "reg testing" is only to check fertility - and not about preventing genetic problems in puppies.

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OK so you are confident with the breeder (I probably wouldn't be, but I'm not you).

You do need to know that sometimes flat faced, drop eared dogs can have problems with other dogs being unable to read their expressions. The mere fact that eyes are placed facing forward in a brachy breed can be interpreted as a hostile stare to a dog that has eyes on either side of the head. You quite probably have noticed some dogs appearing to take offence at the mere existence of your partner's dog.

The good news is that you are getting your staffy pup at an age when she is still learning to interpret dog stances and facial expressions. So if you take the time to carefully socialise your pup with many different dog types (NOT at a random dog park but in carefully monitored situations with your friends and neighbours dogs) then you won't have any problems with your staffy not getting on with other dogs. 

In a nutshell, if you take the time to train her correctly, you shouldn't have any problems.

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