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Ricky2

Brush dog's teeth

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Ricky2   

Hiya!

So my 1 nearly 2 year old pup has some plaque/tartar on her teeth,especially now since i've changed her kibble it seems like its getting worse and i would like to know if there's anything to reverse it or prevent it from getting worse without having to go under-1* Too pricey,2*Heard some bad things from people whose dogs  had their teeth cleaned under anaesthesia.

Since ive never,ever, brushed my dogs teeth-its not heard about too frequently in my country,especially since its only been a few years since people started to actually care about pets etc..

If i start brushing her teeth,which i think will  be nearly impossible as she hates when we are too fussy around her,and doesnt really apreciate when i try to check her teeth,will i be able to have her teeth sparkling white? or will it just stop from getting worse?

Has anyone heard about DentaSure ® All-Natural Oral Care Spray ..  it is said to completely remove tartar,plaque etc...If it does work i would be willing to try and get a bottle-it will be a nightmare for her as she hates sprays-Starts barking at flea spray as soon as she sees it,also hates when i need to apply ear drops to her ears.(ah! sorry out of topic)

Thanks 

Edited by Ricky2

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tdierikx   

How about giving her some raw chicken wings to chew on? Raw chicken bones are not brittle, and clean teeth beautifully...

 

T.

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Ricky2   

@tdierikx

completely Organic? Or is it fine if the chicken are fed both grain+grass/kale+leftovers...If fed frequently will it completely clean her teeth?

Thanks

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Edible bones are terrific teeth cleaners :) 

Depending on the size of your dog ... use frozen chicken wings , turkey necks , or as a meal , a whole frozen chicken carcass/frame /lamb flaps,  or frozen beef brisket  bones.

GNAWING/chewing should take a while . Crunching does not clean teeth . 

have a look here :)
 

Depositphotos_116160076_m-2015.jpg
 
7 Mar 2017 by Robert Belobrajdic

3 Tips To Keep Your Dog’s Teeth Clean

You may think that “doggie breath” is just part of a dog being a dog. But that bad breath is probably a sign that your dog’s teeth need some attention. Letting bad breath go is a good way to end up with a very expensive veterinary bill. Did you know your best friend can actually die from untreated dental issues? Periodontal Disease (which affects eighty percent of dogs over the age of three-years-old) can lead to infections. Infections in the teeth can then spread through the blood stream to the kidneys, liver, heart and other organs. In the heart, it causes Bacterial Endocarditis – a blood infection in the heart valves – that can be fatal. As you can see, good dental health is very important. The following are a few tips to help keep your dog’s teeth pearly white and infection free.

1. Let Them Chew

Yup, you read that right. We want your dog to chew on things. Chewing is a dog’s natural way of cleaning those teeth. What your dog is chewing on does matter, however. Choose toys that floss (rope bones), massage the gums (rubber toys with nubs or rounded edges), or break up tarter (harder plastic than rubber, but not so hard there is a risk of teeth breaking). Edible dental chews can be good, but read the ingredient list first – a lot of them are full of fillers and junk that your dog should not be getting. For edible chews, the we recommend meaty bones. All-natural (unlike those processed chews), they clean the dog’s teeth while providing a healthy supplement to their meal. Meaty, fatty, frozen bones are best. I recommend chicken necks for small dogs and frozen beef brisket for large dogs. With anything your dog is chewing, be sure to supervise as things can get stuck, but dogs must chew. It’s how nature intended your dog to clean their teeth.

2. Feed Good Food

How do we get cavities? By eating sugary junk food. Well, your dog is the same way. Feeding junk kibble that is full of sugars and starches will cause the same damage in your own dog’s mouth. Feeding a natural, high quality food will help keep those teeth healthier. Adding in fresh vegetables like carrots give you two benefits – they give your dog essential vitamins and are a wonderful hard, healthy chew for their teeth. You can freeze the carrots for bigger dogs or those with powerful jaws, or as a cool treat when it’s hot outside.

3. Give Him Herbs

There are a few herbs that help with different dental problems, including bad breath. These are not a substitute for going to the veterinarian, but a compliment that can help prevent or treat issues along with your vet prescribed treatment. For fresh breath, try peppermint, parsley, fennel and dill. These are easy to feed, just sprinkle a teaspoon on your dog’s food once a day every day.

What should you do if your dog’s breath really does stink?

If you notice, even with the good food and the routine chewing, that your dog’s breath is really bad, you may already be dealing with an infection. If your dog lets you, check their teeth and see if you can see

any obvious problems – tartar build-up, bleeding, swollen gums, cracked teeth – the same things you would look for in your own mouth. If you see anything or suspect there may be something going on that you can’t see, a vet visit is the best course of action.

 


:)

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Ricky2   

@persephone I do give her raw bones from time to time...once or twice every few months. Although its not heard about too frequently at least that ik of, i've just read a while ago that feeding raw can cause paralysis by the Campylobacter bacteria-,most specificaly found in chicken D: - read it from someone who used to give her a dow raw chicken wings etc... and her dog started losing feeling on hind legs etc..once she stopped feeding her the chicken the doy got better. Maybe im contradicting myself when asking for advice and then coming up with all this crap,maybe im just being overly concerned,but i cant help but worry with every little thing,especially being the first time knowing that their diet can be improved.

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Kazm   

I give my little schnauzer girl lamb off cut bones twice a week and her teeth are great. Keeps the boredom down, she loves them and they do a great job on the teeth. 

And I also feed her raw chicken wing/necks a couple of times a week for her dinner also. Always have with all my dogs and never had an issue. 

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1 hour ago, Ricky2 said:

read it from someone who used to give her a dow raw chicken wings etc... and her dog started losing feeling on hind legs etc..once she stopped feeding her the chicken the doy got better.

It is NOT the actual bacteria which affects dogs .. the paralysis is triggered by the bacterial infection  :) A rare condition , thankfully ...similar to the Human Guillean-Barre syndrome .. a paralysis triggered by a bacterial/viral infection ... :(



OK .. so, no chicken . That's fine :)
there are plenty of lamb ribs/necks , oxtails, beef brisket .... LOTS of different and edible bones you can find at the butchers :)

Edited by persephone
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Nothing you can do at home beats toothbrushing, it’s the gold standard. But if your dog needs a dental under GA, then it needs a dental under GA. If your mouth is painful you’re not going to want people poking around in it and bones will also hurt for that matter, but if you’re a dog you’ll keep eating until your mouth is extremely rotten and you’ve decided that death is a better option (not hyperbole). You also can’t remove disease that’s under the gumline without them being anaesthetised. It sounds like you’ve heard some scaremongering about dental surgery... it’s honestly routine surgery for dogs unless a specialist is needed. :) 

 

 

Edited by Papillon Kisses
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Dogsfevr   

I brush my dogs teeth weekly ,I use a finger brush and electric toothbrush.

They also get bones and I have dental scrapers 

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Ricky2   

@Dogsfevr @Papillon Kisses Thanks,do you have any idea that if i start brushing her teeth from now on,will i be able to remove the tartar she has or will it just stop  from getting worse?

Ah! Jokes on me,ive tried positive reeinforcement with her when needing to apply something,letting her sniff the stuff and rewarding her and she'll go bonkers and look at me like "Mate, i aint dumb,feed me as much as you want i'll still be an annoying b*tch and bark at that!" *Excuse my language. Tried with flea spray,letting her sniff it, today for example had to apply antiseptic to her paw i let her sniff it and rewarded it and she went bonkers and started yapping at the bottle,thinking it was a toy and something funny

Edited by Ricky2

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Ok so you need some help with technique. See if there’s a trainer near you who can help with “cooperative care” and “counter conditioning and desensitisation” (you will need to ask). PPGA and Delta are good places to look for trainers.

 

You’re best to see a vet who can tell you if she needs a dental treatment before you get started with toothbrushing.

Edited by Papillon Kisses
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Dogsfevr   
12 hours ago, Ricky2 said:

@Dogsfevr @Papillon Kisses Thanks,do you have any idea that if i start brushing her teeth from now on,will i be able to remove the tartar she has or will it just stop  from getting worse?

Ah! Jokes on me,ive tried positive reeinforcement with her when needing to apply something,letting her sniff the stuff and rewarding her and she'll go bonkers and look at me like "Mate, i aint dumb,feed me as much as you want i'll still be an annoying b*tch and bark at that!" *Excuse my language. Tried with flea spray,letting her sniff it, today for example had to apply antiseptic to her paw i let her sniff it and rewarded it and she went bonkers and started yapping at the bottle,thinking it was a toy and something funny

Sometimes yes getting them cleaned whilst young and starting from scratch is a good idea .

After having them done you need to keep on top of it .

 

Its not negotiable what my dogs accept ,there not forced they get taught young and it’s normal to them but it’s not show and tell ,foot needs checking it’s done .

My dogs are show dogs and crave the grooming attention and reward ,my big dog sleeps on the table whilst I scrap his teeth,they get brushed in the bath 

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