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Sedate Dog For A Vet Visit?

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I would like to know others thoughts on sedating a dog for a vet visit. There is a story to this but basically I would like to know if others do this and under what circumstances they would.

I am talking about a routine visit for annual vac's, heartworm and kennel cough. Kennel cough in the neck by the way as I can't even consider the nasal administration of kennel cough. Also unfortunately the dog does get those anal glands looked at as well.

It was suggested today that I sedate one 10kg dog. The vet was one I don't know (? filling in) and didn't like much. Unfortunately either did the dog so the dog wasn't done. My other dog was on anti inflammatory drugs prescribed only last Thursday. I asked about this first to check even thou it should be in the record. And found that she couldn't get vaccinated either while on medication.

So all in all not very productive. I did ask a vet at my old clinic last year if she thought sedation was warranted and she advised no. She did the dog OK. I have to wait a while for one dog to be off medication so have time to think about what is the best thing to do.

I will consult for professional advice but some others here often have a lot of experience to pass on.

And as to the vaccination question, I was thinking of titre test but no one here does it that I have found and my dog clubs/kennel still require vac's. So I think I will leave that question for another time.

Dogs are 5 and 6 years old, de-sexed, do obedience and agility and not aggressive.

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I would like to know others thoughts on sedating a dog for a vet visit. There is a story to this but basically I would like to know if others do this and under what circumstances they would.

I am talking about a routine visit for annual vac's, heartworm and kennel cough. Kennel cough in the neck by the way as I can't even consider the nasal administration of kennel cough. Also unfortunately the dog does get those anal glands looked at as well.

It was suggested today that I sedate one 10kg dog. The vet was one I don't know (? filling in) and didn't like much. Unfortunately either did the dog so the dog wasn't done. My other dog was on anti inflammatory drugs prescribed only last Thursday. I asked about this first to check even thou it should be in the record. And found that she couldn't get vaccinated either while on medication.

So all in all not very productive. I did ask a vet at my old clinic last year if she thought sedation was warranted and she advised no. She did the dog OK. I have to wait a while for one dog to be off medication so have time to think about what is the best thing to do.

I will consult for professional advice but some others here often have a lot of experience to pass on.

And as to the vaccination question, I was thinking of titre test but no one here does it that I have found and my dog clubs/kennel still require vac's. So I think I will leave that question for another time.

Dogs are 5 and 6 years old, de-sexed, do obedience and agility and not aggressive.

i am really reluctant to sedate animals for vet visits. the dog can get confused and it doesn't help them deal with the situation.

seems to me this vet wants to make it easier for their examination rather than look at whats best for the dog.

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I am following Dr. Jean Dodd's vaccination regime (ie "less is more") so won't be doing the yearly vaccination protocol regardless. I will face the issue of "going to training" (or not) when I come to it, as my boy is only young and is covered by his puppy vaccinations for the time being. I will not have drugs administered to my dog just to satisfy what I consider some 'law' or policy that simply hasn't been addressed to up-date it.

If my Vet won't titre test, I'll go somewhere that does.

Even if I did vaccinate more regularly and if one was due, I would not vaccinate if the dog was not in full health.

I would and will not drug my dog (ie sedate) unless it is absolutely necessary.

Edited by Erny

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the fact your vet does annual vacc & heartworm jab on the same day is a worry.This is against the manufacturers advice.

Maybe give where your located or close too & people may now a vet that does titre test.

I wouldnt sedate the dog unless it was so bad.

Having said that some people are unable to control there dogs so they can be a risk.

My dog is a needle phobic but i am very capable at handling him .

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hey!! its been ages since i have heard from you, how did the move go?

I would not sedate your dogs, i know both of them, and we never had a problem with them at work!

We have a vet who comes into work, and we do the nasal to every dog, our vet is fantastic, she knows what she is doing and is fast, hell, if she can do Atlas, she can do any dog :rolleyes:

We did have another vet come in to do some work on someone elses dog, the dog had to be sedated for less then 5 mins of treatment, it was so sad, i felt so sorry for her :rolleyes:

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why would you sedate a dog for such routine things :laugh:

Get started on the consult, see how the dog goes and at worst place a muzzle on it.

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If the dog bites- use a muzzle- an OPEN mesh one- not one of those tight fitting nylon things .. which restrict the dog's panting/breathing under stress.

If the dog is fearful.. use rescue remedy.. and odd visits to the vet just to get liver treats, perhaps?

The only dog I have seen sedated prior to vet visits was a client's very large, very human aggressive male boxer!! We would not see him unless he was muzzled and sedated!!

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I don't mind the soft muzzles being used for such things as visits to the Vets, provided its use is for a very short time. The soft muzzles can take away the dog's perception that it can 'win' by aggressing and thereby can (note : not "will") aid in the dog not exhibiting aggression in the first place, thus thwarting 'learnt behaviour'.

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Thanks to everyone for your help. Now I have lots to consider!

Jaxx'Buddy - I was wondering too if sedation only helps the vet, not help how the dog feels. Would it be like being scared stiff but not be able to co-ordinate?

I am in Wollongong. Newish here and the dogs were not at the vets till now but he has been really great with my old cat recently. But like I said, I did not know the vet today.

settrlvr - I have had the dogs 3 years and 3 different vets did all injections on the same day. So if heartworm should be done at a different time why don't vets say anything. I can ask and could try and break up the visits to 2 a year. One for heartworm and 1 for KC and vacs. I will need to research this too.

I can't see myself drugging the dog, only if I respect the vet and they are convinced the dog will be better off.

Hi Terrorbull -I am settling in here, work is interesting and the beaches are so good. I feel like I am on constant holidays! But I am sure the dogs find it a lot busier at the parks/beaches here. It is the sleek little black dog that is being such a pansy.

The first 2 years I did the nasal admin and this is what created most of his panic. By the second time it took the vet ages to do and I swore never again. When I found the neck injection existed I did this and it wasn't so bad, particularly with a lady vet. He is such a smoocher normally. But he came with a few issues which I try to solve. He has improved so much but at times he has a flashback and you would swear he is if fear of his life!

I am not concerned healthwise about vaccinations but what can you do if your club demands they are done? Of course you can bring these things up for discussion but this takes time to change. Although I found the Parramatta club for agility took titre test results. Mind you that brings up the question of taking blood for the testing. God,that sounds even harder.

I think I will go back with both and get heartworm done in one visit and see how the normal vet goes with the difficult dog. Now I will have to start/ devise some extra help with dog in training classes. Although some people think I am strange when I tell them the dog causes any problem as he seems so easy in other situations.

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Isn't there a chance that with sedating that it might disguise or mask any other symptoms the dog has - either those there at the vet for or ones the owner might not have noticed?

Cannot say I would be keen on giving a dog such a drug if not necessary.

If heartworm is such a drama then why not which to monthly tablets? There is a lot of people who do not like the annual vacs for good reasons.

Edited by Danois

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I think I will go back with both and get heartworm done in one visit ...

Why are you going for the heartworm injection? There's no need for the injection and if you are in an area where you need the heartworm cover, why not daily tabs, or if you prefer, the monthly chewables? (Which are actually good for 45 days cover).

Personally, I won't touch the once a year heartworm injection.

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It's a bit of a hike for you, but if you want a vet who has excellent animal handling skills, try Michelle at Sylvania Vet Clinic.

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I agree- the monthly tablets are good- and no trauma.

The less stuff floating around in the dog's bloodstream, the better!

If your dog is fearful... then contact a behaviourist and see if there are any ways you can help , maybe.

or, something like THIS ?

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I'm surprised that the vet suggested sedating the dog for such routine stuff. My dogs get their vaccines and nasal drops without any issues. And continue to love the vet :thumbsup:

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Why is the yearly heartworm considered bad. Is it a high rate of dosage? Not sure how they work for a complete year or more.

But thanks Erny, with that info and since handling one dog is an issue I will look into monthly tabs.

Called the clinic today and asked for a visit with the normal vet as soon as one dog is over her recent medication. She seemed to think I would have better results with him and did not seem surprised that I wasn't happy with this other doctor. So i will see how it goes then.

I will talk to the Chief instructor on Wed and ask her why titre tests are accepted at some dog clubs but not ours. Since we all compet and are registered with the same group? I wonder what they would say?

Hey, that would be 2 needles cancelled.

Odin-Genie- your dogs look like they'd love everybody.

I do feel useless at times. Neither dog had a great start but the girl by nature is very tolerant and upbeat, no problem ( at least in the vet dept). And it is too easy to blame their past before I got them. Sure it had an effect but maybe I could have handled them better. I was made aware of some issues when i got them and did get behaviour advice from professionals with both of them. Boy, did I need it as I had to get them both in the same week! I have learnt heaps thou and it never stops. (Plus they are so worth it!)

Maybe it would help if at obedience training I get different instructors before class to vet him. At agility and my previous club he was OK but at my new club, different story. If we work on it with a more concentrated effort it could help.

Thanks for your advice.

Edited by skip

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Thanks Erny

I did read it and I noted the DOGlogic site cause I may go back when I have more time. Interesting the use of Ivermectin for alternative treatment for heartworm. I knew a Doberman years ago who had this treatment and survived but it was very hard on the dog.

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We have a couple of clients who sedate prior to coming in. But we are talking about dogs who cannot be so much as touched without turning very aggressive. Most of these are light sedations, however we have one in particular that often needs a heavier one just to have its nails clipped. But at the same time there are vets who generally have better handling skills than others and know how to make a dog feel relaxed.

From a vets point of view, it is not easy trying to thoroughly examine a dog who is trying to bite your face off. But in saying that, we cope with 99% of them with just a muzzle.

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