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Whippet

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Troy   

The Whippet

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=131 )

Group: Group 4 (Hounds)

General Appearance: Balanced combination of muscular power and strength with elegance and grace of outline. Built for speed and work. All forms of exaggeration should be avoided.

Characteristics: An ideal companion. Highly adaptable in domestic and sporting surroundings.

Temperament: Gentle, affectionate, even disposition.

Head And Skull: Long and lean, flat on top, tapering to muzzle with slight stop, rather wide between the eyes, jaws powerful and clean cut. Nose black, in blues a bluish colour is permitted, liver nose in creams and other dilute colours, in whites or parti-colour a butterfly nose is permissible.

Eyes: Oval, bright, expression very alert.

Ears: Rose shaped, small, fine in texture.

Mouth: Jaws strong with a perfect, regular and complete scissor bite, i.e. the upper teeth closely overlapping the lower teeth and set square to the jaws.

Neck: Long, muscular, elegantly arched.

Forequarters: Shoulders well laid back with flat muscles. Moderate space between the shoulder blades at the withers. The upper arm is approximately of equal length to the shoulder, placed so that the elbow falls directly under the withers when viewed in profile. Forearms straight and upright with moderate bladed bone. Front not too wide. Pasterns strong with slight spring.

Body: Chest very deep with plenty of heart room. Well filled in front. Brisket deep. Broad, well muscled back, firm, somewhat long, showing graceful arch over the loin but not humped. Ribs well sprung. Loin giving the impression of strength and power. Definite tuck up.

Hindquarters: Strong, broad across the thighs, with well developed second thighs. Stifles well bent without exaggeration with hocks well let down. Able to stand naturally over a lot of ground.

Feet: Oval, well split between the toes, knuckles well arched, pads thick, nails strong.

Tail: No feathering. Long, tapering, reaching at least to the hock. When in action carried in a delicate curve not higher then the back.

Gait/Movement: Should possess great freedom of action. In profile should move with a long, easy stride whilst holding the topline. The forelegs should be thrown forward and low over the ground. Hind legs should come well under the body giving great propelling power. General movement not to look stilted, high stepping, short mincing. True coming and going.

Coat: Fine, short, close in texture.

Colour: Any colour or mixture of colours

Sizes: Desirable height

Dogs 47-51 cms (18.5 - 20 ins)

Bitches 44-47 cms (17.5 - 18.5 ins)

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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OSoSwift   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

First time Whippet owner

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

In the North of England for rabbit hunting and "rag" races. They were the poor mans Greyhound

3. How common is it in Australia?

Quite common, quite a number of registered ethical breeders.

4. What is the average lifespan?

around 12 to 14 years, with some living to be older

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Very people orientated, eager to please. Biddable and quite good to train.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

20 minutes free running and they spend the rest of the day sleeping, but will quite happily do more.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Yes, but need to make sure to train a good recall from early on.

9. How much grooming is required?

Very little

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

In my experience they are very good around children and are not pushy heavy dogs so would be good with infirm people as well I believe

post-23623-1247405243_thumb.jpg

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Tambaqui   

QUESTIONS: Will only answer some

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Former owner of one and my parent bred a litter of Whippets for two pups for the show ring.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

I am sure those who know the breed very well will be able to answer this question, I was only a young boy when I owned my first dog being this breed.

3. How common is it in Australia?

Possibly not that common, but you may see one here and there, and just recently at my obedience club, I just saw a whippet training.

It's more so a case by case basis of where they are common, but I don't know of any living around where I live.

4. What is the average lifespan?

They are known to be past 10 years.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

I think it is again case by case basis, but the whippet I owned was probably the quietest dear little girl and she would happily follow you around and go out with you anywhere and as they grow older, they tend to relax a lot more and spend more time sleeping and enjoying the sun if it comes out.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Back when I owned this little whippet, she was rarely walked and would just happily go out the backyard and wander or have a run around or if there was toys out, they'd easily occupy themselves with it, but my first dog was a more so of a companion dog and back in the old days, I would put her on a lead and bring her with me and my parent for a drive anywhere we went and it was no fuss for her.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Most definitely, they are not demanding or the type breed that expect you to devote your attention every hour, every day, they are such a content breed and would enjoy being your companion when you are around.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

I was at school (Primary) during the time of owning my whippet, and at time, my parent would go out and leave her home, and during the time she was here, she would never damage anything or even dream of causing trouble! But again it is how you raise your pup, if they grow up to be a troublemaker, then you will have one on your hand.

9. How much grooming is required?

Little to none! Their coats are so short, so it doesn't need so much grooming, but maybe a simple brush once a week will suffice, but it depends on their coat.

However, I must add though, Whippets are a very sensitive breed, most particularly in the winter, so make sure you have a coat available should you decide to own one, and they are happy to wear their coat, especially when the days/nights are cold!

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Definitely not. We've had a litter of pup with our whippet, and during the time we've owned them, they've never jumped on me or tried to play rough (I was young, possibly 9 or 10 years old at the time) and they generally just wander around and just come up to you and just let you pat them. Again they are a quiet natured breed and they are content the majority of the time.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

It is not my place to answer this question as I was very young when we owned this breed, so I am sure an experienced breeder or current owners of Whippets will be able to answer this question.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Although times have changed since I have owned one, but again some common sense should apply here. Ask about their breeding, any hereditary problems that they may have.

I'd probably find out if you could see their parents, so that you can get a rough idea of their personality and also how developed they are.

I will attach a photo of the whippet I have owned later on!

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jacobite   

The Whippet

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=131 )

Group: Group 4 (Hounds)

General Appearance: Balanced combination of muscular power and strength with elegance and grace of outline. Built for speed and work. All forms of exaggeration should be avoided.

Characteristics: An ideal companion. Highly adaptable in domestic and sporting surroundings.

Temperament: Gentle, affectionate, even disposition.

Head And Skull: Long and lean, flat on top, tapering to muzzle with slight stop, rather wide between the eyes, jaws powerful and clean cut. Nose black, in blues a bluish colour is permitted, liver nose in creams and other dilute colours, in whites or parti-colour a butterfly nose is permissible.

Eyes: Oval, bright, expression very alert.

Ears: Rose shaped, small, fine in texture.

Mouth: Jaws strong with a perfect, regular and complete scissor bite, i.e. the upper teeth closely overlapping the lower teeth and set square to the jaws.

Neck: Long, muscular, elegantly arched.

Forequarters: Shoulders well laid back with flat muscles. Moderate space between the shoulder blades at the withers. The upper arm is approximately of equal length to the shoulder, placed so that the elbow falls directly under the withers when viewed in profile. Forearms straight and upright with moderate bladed bone. Front not too wide. Pasterns strong with slight spring.

Body: Chest very deep with plenty of heart room. Well filled in front. Brisket deep. Broad, well muscled back, firm, somewhat long, showing graceful arch over the loin but not humped. Ribs well sprung. Loin giving the impression of strength and power. Definite tuck up.

Hindquarters: Strong, broad across the thighs, with well developed second thighs. Stifles well bent without exaggeration with hocks well let down. Able to stand naturally over a lot of ground.

Feet: Oval, well split between the toes, knuckles well arched, pads thick, nails strong.

Tail: No feathering. Long, tapering, reaching at least to the hock. When in action carried in a delicate curve not higher then the back.

Gait/Movement: Should possess great freedom of action. In profile should move with a long, easy stride whilst holding the topline. The forelegs should be thrown forward and low over the ground. Hind legs should come well under the body giving great propelling power. General movement not to look stilted, high stepping, short mincing. True coming and going.

Coat: Fine, short, close in texture.

Colour: Any colour or mixture of colours

Sizes: Desirable height

Dogs 47-51 cms (18.5 - 20 ins)

Bitches 44-47 cms (17.5 - 18.5 ins)

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I own a pedigree whipet and have bred 2 litters from her.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

The Whippet as it is known today was the miners dog in parts of Yorkshire and Lancashire, used for racing and catching rabbits and maybe hares for the pot. Indeed these useful little dogs often provided the only meat for the family, and one who could race and work was greatly prized.

3. How common is it in Australia?

Quite common, you only have to go to an average all breeds dog show to see about 20 or more of them and there must be many more in pet homes.

4. What is the average lifespan?

I would think 12 to 14 years, mine is 13.5 and shows no sign of giving up the couch just yet.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Generally very laid back, but the younger ones do need somewhere to have a good run once or twice a week, unless you have a fairly large back yard where they can entertain themselves.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

See above.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Yes I think it would be.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

An older dog would be OK, I think a puppy left on its own for a long period might not cope well.

9. How much grooming is required?

Very little, a rub over with a grooming glove every couple of weeks should be enough.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

No whippets are very gentle dogs, thought I guess any puppy can be a bit excitable.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Not that I know of, but the Whippet Club would be the people to ask on this one.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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sheena   

A friend of mine wants a smallish girl dog with a lovely personality that she can also enjoy agility with. I suggested a whippet. Evidently the vet told her that whippets are not suitable for agility because of their bone structure & they have a lot of injuries etc. Is this true???

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A friend of mine wants a smallish girl dog with a lovely personality that she can also enjoy agility with. I suggested a whippet. Evidently the vet told her that whippets are not suitable for agility because of their bone structure & they have a lot of injuries etc. Is this true???

No. They arent' the easiest of agilty prospects but there are a few competing.

Physically a well bred Whippet is very sound and extremely athletic.

They do get injured by hitting things at very high speed and skin tears aren't uncommon from fences. However the aim in agility is to run over things, not into them. :laugh:

Edited by poodlefan

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A Whippet wouldn't be my first choice as an obedience or agility dog, they can be more of a challenge than many breeds when it comes to training, but they are certainly athletic.

Crashing into things at high speed and running into sticks etc during a chase, have been the leading cause of injuries to mine. Having said that, mine see the chiro less than my Staffords.

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OSoSwift   

I do Obedience and Agility with both of my Whippets.

They are both very good at it and far more trainable than I thought. There are a few things to note however. They are very soft so you need to adjust your training to suit. Even a grumble to yourself will potentially put them off they are also very attunded to your emotions, so you get stressed they will pick up on it.

Lewis would train until he dropped from exhaustion, as long as he gets a treat and some pats with a ball thrown occasionally he is in heaven. He will happily train every day and love every minute of it. Rommi will work to a point. She hates training every day and about every third is ideal for her. She will work to a point on any given day and too much repition or if she gets too tired and she will just stop. She does work very well, but will not go to the ends of the earth.

I think they are a very sound breed and as mentioned before high speed crashed between dogs and running into objects at speed are most likely to cause injury. I have not had either of my dogs injure themselves through agility or jumping yet and I regard them as a breed that is not likjely to have joint or bone problems due to agility, jumping and training.

I have had them run into very solid objects and go flying through the air screaming their heads off but have not had any stitch ups or broken bones so far. I am quite sure it will happen eventually.

If you specifically wanted a Whippet for agility you would need to choose your puppy carefully to get the temperment most suited to agility and training. I have been told my male heels like a Border Collie and I agree he is very good. He is also very soft so one thing goes not quite right and he will potentially spit his chewy for the day.

There is an exceptionally good Whippet with a huge amount of titles competeing in Queensland and the lady has just bought Lewis's sister with the view to doing FLyball, agility, jumpers, games and obedience with her.

Edited by Rommi n Lewis

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Sheena, there are alot of working whippets in australia and they work well. I cant see how it could be a popular rabbiting/hunting dog if it were prone to injuries in something like agility. I dont quite understand where the vet was coming from with that statement

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murve   
Hi I was wondering if anyone knows of a good whippet breeder in Victoria?

Hi there ManiM well a good place is to contact the Whippet Club Vic, I know 3 good breeders, one near Geelong , 2 near Pakenham , PM me if you want contact details.

I do Obedience & my my daughter will be doing Agility & Endurance Test with him :rofl:

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megan_   

My friend has a whippet who has an excellent recall (better than almost every other dog I've seen!), does clicker training and picks up everything very quickly and is very outgoing and confident.

Every other whippet I have met though (about half a dozen) has been very timid - tail between the legs, shaking, weary of strangers etc. Is this common in whippets?

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My friend has a whippet who has an excellent recall (better than almost every other dog I've seen!), does clicker training and picks up everything very quickly and is very outgoing and confident.

Every other whippet I have met though (about half a dozen) has been very timid - tail between the legs, shaking, weary of strangers etc. Is this common in whippets?

It's not unheard of but its not what the breed standard calls for and I'd not call it 'common'. I think socialisation plays a big part of this and genetics does the rest. Most of the Whippets I know are quite outgoing.

My Whippet boy is confident and outgoing. However Whippets don't do well with owners who throw tantrums, heavy handed training and stressful households. Can't say I blame them. :)

Edited by poodlefan

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OSoSwift   
My friend has a whippet who has an excellent recall (better than almost every other dog I've seen!), does clicker training and picks up everything very quickly and is very outgoing and confident.

Every other whippet I have met though (about half a dozen) has been very timid - tail between the legs, shaking, weary of strangers etc. Is this common in whippets?

It's not unheard of but its not what the breed standard calls for and I'd not call it 'common'. I think socialisation plays a big part of this and genetics does the rest. Most of the Whippets I know are quite outgoing.

My Whippet boy is confident and outgoing. However Whippets don't do well with owners who throw tantrums, heavy handed training and stressful households. Can't say I blame them. :)

I agree. My whippets are clicker trained and have great recalls as well. They are not timid but they don't like it if I raise my voice to the kids at all.

My Whippets love people and if anything are a little too enthuiastic with their greeting.

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Kirislin   

Some whippets are timid but some are just aloof and because their natural tail carriage is down and sometimes even between their legs, people who aren't familiar with the breed assume they are timid. They are generally sensitive dogs but not necessarily timid. I actually like it when they're aloof with people they dont know. My 2 little blue girls are like that, the others are a bit more outgoing.

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OSoSwift   

I agree Kirislin, Rommi naturally carries her tail tucked under quite a way and isn't a real tail wagger. You are more likely to get a mouth full of whoo whoo's and cheek before she turns into a waggy tail dog. Lewis doesn't carry his tail as low and is naturally a waggy dog. Just saying his name gets a tail wag, give him a good chat and a scratch and it's going flat out.

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joelle   

Hi :)

Are these a breed that a 9 yr old boy could easily handle and train? (With suppport from adults of course)

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