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Random Person Taking The Dogs Photo

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Alyosha   

Your rangers sound pretty sensible. And if they have met you and Zig before I would think they might not take her photos seriously. I did some work with Queanbeyan rangers a few years back and they were pretty switched on as far as pitbull ID was concerned.

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Your rangers sound pretty sensible. And if they have met you and Zig before I would think they might not take her photos seriously. I did some work with Queanbeyan rangers a few years back and they were pretty switched on as far as pitbull ID was concerned.

They are awesome down here..

When Ollie died and we went in to pick up our little foster kelpie, the kid asked if they had any staffies - they directed us to him and said, he is really scared in here but we think he will be awesome out..

The rest as they say is history... :thumbsup:

I took him back up to see them when I picked Pippa up as another foster and they couldn't believe the change in him.

The council workers in the park are awesome to, so I really don't think I will have any trouble..

This is about the 3rd time he has been labelled a PB by someone though..

To me he is just a generic brindle BYB staffy cross (crossed with god knows what he is a gorgeous 27kg lap dog)..

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Agree with Reverend Jo. I'd take her pic and one of her licence plate too if you can. When I lived in Canberra and walked all the time I used to encounter idiots and bullies like this on a regular basis.

S

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Snook   

I am pretty sure you are not allowed to take photos or videos of children without the parents permission...but not sure about taking photos of people.

The law doesn't differentiate between adults and children when it come to photographing them on public land. The only protection afforded to children is that you cannot take indecent photos of them if they are under 16. Just so people are aware, you can also be photographed legally when you are on private property if the photographer is on public land. So, if you sun bake in the nude in your front yard and can be seen from the footpath, you can be photographed and you have no legal recourse.

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I am pretty sure you are not allowed to take photos or videos of children without the parents permission...but not sure about taking photos of people.

The law doesn't differentiate between adults and children when it come to photographing them on public land. The only protection afforded to children is that you cannot take indecent photos of them if they are under 16. Just so people are aware, you can also be photographed legally when you are on private property if the photographer is on public land. So, if you sun bake in the nude in your front yard and can be seen from the footpath, you can be photographed and you have no legal recourse.

Thanks, wow our rules are so lax.

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I am pretty sure you are not allowed to take photos or videos of children without the parents permission...but not sure about taking photos of people.

The law doesn't differentiate between adults and children when it come to photographing them on public land. The only protection afforded to children is that you cannot take indecent photos of them if they are under 16. Just so people are aware, you can also be photographed legally when you are on private property if the photographer is on public land. So, if you sun bake in the nude in your front yard and can be seen from the footpath, you can be photographed and you have no legal recourse.

Thanks, wow our rules are so lax.

Not accurate entirely

"Anti-Voyeurism Laws

The situation in NSW used to be that if photos were taken of people without their consent to provide sexual arousal or gratification, then photographers risked being charged with Offensive Behaviour under Section 21G NSW Summary Offences Act 1988.

Section 21G was however repealed at the end of 2008. From 2009 onwards, "Peeping Tom" photography in NSW is now addressed by Division 15B of the NSW Crimes Act 1900, specifically the Voyeurism and related offences provisions in sections 91I, 91J, 91K, 91L and 91M.

Note that Division 15B does not generally apply to everyday candid photography. This is because its scope is carefully limited to (a) photographs of a sexual and voyeuristic nature, usually of a person's private parts; (b) taken without consent and © taken in places where a reasonable person would reasonably expect to be afforded privacy (such as toilets, showers, changing rooms, enclosed backyards etc.)."

here

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Ahh good to know. I think taking pictures of someone on their own private property, no matter where you may be standing, is rude and a bit pervy.

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Snook   

I am pretty sure you are not allowed to take photos or videos of children without the parents permission...but not sure about taking photos of people.

The law doesn't differentiate between adults and children when it come to photographing them on public land. The only protection afforded to children is that you cannot take indecent photos of them if they are under 16. Just so people are aware, you can also be photographed legally when you are on private property if the photographer is on public land. So, if you sun bake in the nude in your front yard and can be seen from the footpath, you can be photographed and you have no legal recourse.

Thanks, wow our rules are so lax.

Not accurate entirely

"Anti-Voyeurism Laws

The situation in NSW used to be that if photos were taken of people without their consent to provide sexual arousal or gratification, then photographers risked being charged with Offensive Behaviour under Section 21G NSW Summary Offences Act 1988.

Section 21G was however repealed at the end of 2008. From 2009 onwards, "Peeping Tom" photography in NSW is now addressed by Division 15B of the NSW Crimes Act 1900, specifically the Voyeurism and related offences provisions in sections 91I, 91J, 91K, 91L and 91M.

Note that Division 15B does not generally apply to everyday candid photography. This is because its scope is carefully limited to (a) photographs of a sexual and voyeuristic nature, usually of a person's private parts; (b) taken without consent and © taken in places where a reasonable person would reasonably expect to be afforded privacy (such as toilets, showers, changing rooms, enclosed backyards etc.)."

here

If people can see in to your front yard from the footpath there is no reasonable expectation of privacy. This is different to an enclosed back yard where you would need to climb a ladder or the fence etc.. to see in.

Ahh good to know. I think taking pictures of someone on their own private property, no matter where you may be standing, is rude and a bit pervy.

I love street photography but totally draw the line at photographing people on their own property.

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rubiton   

Snook is correct. Anyone can take anyone elses photo as long as they are standing on public land. When they do those zoomed in photos in the paper of someone at their front door who doesnt want to have their photo taken they are sitting in the car with a zoom lens (they call them doorknocks or something but its similar to when the TT and ACA crews track people down who dont want to talk to them).

You cannot use photos taken in public placesto ridicule someone and you do need permission if it to be used commercially (ie advertising). Editorial use is fine. And animals have no legal rights btw if someone takes their photo without a human it can be used for whatever

And if someone asks you to delete a photo you have absolutely no reason to comply with them unless you want to - there is no law that says anyone can be forced to delete a photo they have taken. If someone is taken unreasonable photos (ie creepy and looks like they are up to no good best to report their behaviour to police - not just some random took a pic but obviously they woudl be doing other stuff too).

This did come up on the forum before whe someone asked about if a random person could take a photo of their kid at a theme park or something.

In this case be upfront if you hav a decent council and say some random woman took a photo of your dog then threatened you that they would report it as a danerous dog even though you explained that the dog was a different breed. Get in first and make sure there is a note somewhere of someone who has nothign better to do that interefere with other people in the neighbourhood.

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Rozzie   

I probably would have got the phone and deleted the photo myself....stupid b*tch

And be charged with theft?

I take pictures of happy dogs out in the park playing...but only with owner permission! Yes on public land you are not subject ton privacy. This person sounds like an ignorant busybody who obviously had a bad Christmas, her kids dont want to know her and shes looking to cause trouble. I agree...no off lead shes seems to have you in her "retribution against the world" sights. If she continues to follow you at the park when you are doing nothing wrong Id take her photo and timestamp it...if she continues such behaviour Id say she is at risk of being dealt with for harassment. Also then you can lodge counterclaim should she cause trouble. Make a note of the occurrence in a diary.

Better still lets just hope it is a one off incident, and she goes off to go pull some wings off some flies.

Huge assumption about the woman involved but I agree with the last part of your post.

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percyk   

if its a proper kids playground you cant be anywhere near there anyway...i think it might be ten metres

if it isnt and kids play there then i guess its ok but you might get someone cranked up

at our school there are parents who bring dogs on leashese to the play equipment ..noone says anything..but it still makes me feel uncomfortable..if the rules are there for everyone then noone should break them

its hard for dogs in oz...so many rules but we will never change anything if we dont follow the law :mad

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juice   

I would take her pic as suggested if she appears again, i would also have a chat to the council workers if you see them and mention it to them, they may have seen her around.

I would get ready for a waiting ranger if i were you.

I got reported once with my old bully by a women training her 2 BCs in the offlead area. Mine were playing and ran straight past her 2 ,stopped to say hello, and then came on my first call.

The next day there was a ranger waiting for me as i had a "dangerous dog" on the loose she said.

Luckily the ranger was fine and said my dogs were all under control and not to worry.

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I am pretty sure you are not allowed to take photos or videos of children without the parents permission...but not sure about taking photos of people.

The law doesn't differentiate between adults and children when it come to photographing them on public land. The only protection afforded to children is that you cannot take indecent photos of them if they are under 16. Just so people are aware, you can also be photographed legally when you are on private property if the photographer is on public land. So, if you sun bake in the nude in your front yard and can be seen from the footpath, you can be photographed and you have no legal recourse.

Thanks, wow our rules are so lax.

Not accurate entirely

"Anti-Voyeurism Laws

The situation in NSW used to be that if photos were taken of people without their consent to provide sexual arousal or gratification, then photographers risked being charged with Offensive Behaviour under Section 21G NSW Summary Offences Act 1988.

Section 21G was however repealed at the end of 2008. From 2009 onwards, "Peeping Tom" photography in NSW is now addressed by Division 15B of the NSW Crimes Act 1900, specifically the Voyeurism and related offences provisions in sections 91I, 91J, 91K, 91L and 91M.

Note that Division 15B does not generally apply to everyday candid photography. This is because its scope is carefully limited to (a) photographs of a sexual and voyeuristic nature, usually of a person's private parts; (b) taken without consent and © taken in places where a reasonable person would reasonably expect to be afforded privacy (such as toilets, showers, changing rooms, enclosed backyards etc.)."

here

Also if you set up a video survellience unit you can video your own property but your video equipment must be located so that it does not record events on public land or another individuals property. So if you want to video your house for security your camera is not allowed to film outside your property, either the footpath out the front or the neighbours yard(or part thereof)

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if its a proper kids playground you cant be anywhere near there anyway...i think it might be ten metres

if it isnt and kids play there then i guess its ok but you might get someone cranked up

at our school there are parents who bring dogs on leashese to the play equipment ..noone says anything..but it still makes me feel uncomfortable..if the rules are there for everyone then noone should break them

its hard for dogs in oz...so many rules but we will never change anything if we dont follow the law :mad

Oh, really? I had no idea dogs couldn't be in a playground! I regularly take Thundercleese to playgrounds, kid's play equipment is his agility equipment :laugh: Of course, he has his fear aggression issues, so if we're doing something like that it's in the middle of the night when no sane person would have their children at the park anyway (and when most normal people are in bed, not taking their dog for a play session)...

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if its a proper kids playground you cant be anywhere near there anyway...i think it might be ten metres

if it isnt and kids play there then i guess its ok but you might get someone cranked up

at our school there are parents who bring dogs on leashese to the play equipment ..noone says anything..but it still makes me feel uncomfortable..if the rules are there for everyone then noone should break them

its hard for dogs in oz...so many rules but we will never change anything if we dont follow the law :mad

Oh, really? I had no idea dogs couldn't be in a playground! I regularly take Thundercleese to playgrounds, kid's play equipment is his agility equipment :laugh: Of course, he has his fear aggression issues, so if we're doing something like that it's in the middle of the night when no sane person would have their children at the park anyway (and when most normal people are in bed, not taking their dog for a play session)...

It is a fenced off area and there are swings and picnic tables in there..

The sign says, dogs must be leashed.. So the dogs are allowed in there.. I have seen plenty of dogs in there with their owners and their kids while having a swing - I would never take him there if there were kids there.. That is the reason we go down about 6am.

I know I am in the wrong having him off lead in an on leash area.. I have never denied that. I know it is against council bylaws but I did it anyway - we have never hurt anyone doing so, it is so early in the morning that we rarely run into anyone other than the usual few that bring their dogs or the same walkers I have been seeing for the last 15 years (doing the same with this guy as I did with the old stafford).. He is off for 10-15 minutes at most, chasing a tennis ball or having a bit of a romp with a couple of other dogs. Then leashed and we continue our walk by going for a swim in the pond and walking for another 40 minutes or so.. Not justifying it but explaining what I do..

Phone photo lady was a no show this morning.. But we stayed on a long lead and played with the ball as we walked (will do this from now on), then went for a swim and more walking.

He met the 3 little pugs again and they were all play bowing - so funny.. The noise the little pugs made was funny, every time one of them snorted and snuffled, Zig stopped to check them out, sniffing and getting really low to see them..

I also saw the other people with the older SBT and they said that they had seen her before..

Lesson learned, won't risk his safety from now on..

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Diva   

if its a proper kids playground you cant be anywhere near there anyway...i think it might be ten metres

if it isnt and kids play there then i guess its ok but you might get someone cranked up

at our school there are parents who bring dogs on leashese to the play equipment ..noone says anything..but it still makes me feel uncomfortable..if the rules are there for everyone then noone should break them

its hard for dogs in oz...so many rules but we will never change anything if we dont follow the law :mad

Oh, really? I had no idea dogs couldn't be in a playground! I regularly take Thundercleese to playgrounds, kid's play equipment is his agility equipment :laugh: Of course, he has his fear aggression issues, so if we're doing something like that it's in the middle of the night when no sane person would have their children at the park anyway (and when most normal people are in bed, not taking their dog for a play session)...

I know in Canberra dogs are prohibited from being within a certain number of metres of play equipment, the exception is if you are walking on a made path which goes closer than the minimum distance. I always assumed it was as much about dogs peeing on equipment etc as it was about dogs and kids directly interacting.

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