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Troy

Cocker Spaniel

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Troy   

The Cocker Spaniel

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=77 )

Group: Group 3 (Gundogs)

General Appearance: Merry, sturdy, sporting; well balanced; compact; measuring approximately same from withers to ground as from withers to root of tail.

Characteristics: Merry nature with ever-wagging tail shows a typical bustling movement, particularly when following scent, fearless of heavy cover.

Temperament: Gentle and affectionate, yet full of life and exuberance.

Head And Skull: Square muzzle, with distinct stop set midway between tip of nose and occiput. Skull well developed, cleanly chiselled, neither too fine nor too coarse. Cheek bones not prominent. Nose sufficiently wide for acute scenting power.

Eyes: Full, but not prominent. Dark brown or brown, never light, but in the case of liver, liver roan, and liver and white, dark hazel to harmonise with coat; with expression of intelligence and gentleness but wide awake, bright and merry; rims tight.

Ears: Lobular, set low on a level with eyes. Fine leathers extending to nose tip. Well clothed with long straight silky hair.

Mouth: Jaws strong with a perfect, regular and complete scissor bite, i.e. Upper teeth closely overlapping lower teeth and set square to the jaws.

Neck: Moderate in length, muscular. Set neatly into fine sloping shoulders. Clean throat.

Forequarters: Shoulders sloping and fine. Legs well boned, straight, sufficiently short for concentrated power. Not too short to interfere with tremendous exertions expected from this grand, sporting dog.

Body: Strong, compact. Chest well developed and brisket deep; neither too wide not too narrow in front. Ribs well sprung. Loin short, wide with firm, level topline gently sloping downwards to tail from end of loin to set on of tail.

Hindquarters: Wide, well rounded, very muscular. Legs well boned, good bend of stifle, short below hock allowing for plenty of drive.

Feet: Firm, thickly padded, cat-like.

Tail: Docked: Set on slightly lower than line of back. Must be merry in action and carried level, never cocked up. Never too short to hide, nor too long to interfere with, the incessant merry action when working.

Undocked: Set on slightly lower than line of back. Must be merry in action and carried level, never cocked up. Slightly curved, of moderate length, proportionate to size of body giving an overall balanced appearance; ideally not reaching below the hock. Strong at the root and tapering to a fine tip; well feathered in keeping with the coat. Lively in action, carried on a plane not higher than level of back and never so low as to indicate timidity.

Gait/Movement: True through action with great drive covering ground well.

Coat: Flat, silky in texture, never wiry or wavy, not too profuse and never curly. Well feathered forelegs, body and hindlegs above hocks.

Colour: Various. In self colours no white allowed except on chest.

Sizes: Height: Dogs approx. 39-41 cms (15.5-16 ins)

Bitches approx. 38-39 cms (15-15.5 ins)

Weight approx. 13-14.5 kgs (28-32 lbs)

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog, and on the dog�s ability to perform its traditional work.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I have owned, bred, showed, trialled, tracked & did endurance with Cockers for 16 years.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Cockers were bred as flushing dog for Woodcock. Originally the cockers came from Water & Land Spaniels, it was common to register different breeds from the one litter, depending on how they grew, as pups they could be shown as a Cocker /Sussex if they grew too big they were shown as Springer Spaniels.

3. How common is it in Australia?

Cockers are very popular in Aust, which in the 70's & 80's was the breeds downfall, with so many people breeding indescriminatley, everyone wanted a gold cocker & very little thought was put into type & temprement, with alot of inbreeding happening.

The dedicated breeders have worked very hard to bring the breed back to the loving, happy, bustling little dog it is now.

4. What is the average lifespan?

Cockers generally will live 14-16 years

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Merry, Merry, Merry, always waggy bum.

They can tend to be a little dominate if allowed.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Cockers are just as happy running on 20 acres or curled up on the couch.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Absolutely, provided they do the training, Cockers have a tendancy to give you "The look", so a firm hand is needed with training.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Yes, so long as you are prepared for Total destruction, they do better with a playmate.

9. How much grooming is required?

It is essential to keep the airflow to the ears clear, & the feet need trimming often.

A good brush daily, however some prefer to have them clipped off.

There are alot of good websites to help new owners.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Cocker are generally a very calm happy dog, and when trained correctly make a fabulous childs mate.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

The most important problem that can occur in Cockers is FN or HN, Familiar Nephritis, is a kidney disease which will generally kill them at a young age, since DNA testing has come in it is helping some breeders try to eliminate this problem, however there are still some cases popping up, any dog which has produced affected puppies of ANY kidney problem should be removed from any breeding program immediatley.

The other problem is PRA - Progressive Retinal Atrophy, which is a condition where the dogs MAY go blind, it is a very painful condition, but thankfully again since DNA testing came in it is not seen as much anymore.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

When purchasing a Cocker, IMO Both parents MUST be clear for FN, but I know alot of breeders do use Carriers in their breeding program, but I wouldn't, no matter how good the dog.

Edited by Silverblue

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becks   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

owner (a while ago)

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

As the standard says 'merry' happy dogs who love attention. Most also LOVE food and will eat anything and everything, so a careful eye on the diet is needed.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Mine would go for a daily 1/2 hour romp off lead

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

yes - but as with all dogs training will be needed.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Not if you like your house intact. Mine was a big chewer of wood when younger - doors, skirting boards etc. She was the dog that showed us crated can be good!

9. How much grooming is required?

Depends on the coat type, mine was a part working dog so didn't have over profuse feathering. A weekly brush and comb and checking ears and feet were all she needed. However (with my groomers hat on here) the show line cockers can have very heavy coats which are a lot of work for the average pet owner so most people have them clipped off completely or at least well trimmed down (and I still get them in with huge mats on the legs and ears)

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

No, most aren't.

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Breeder of 14 yrs

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

14TH.Century Spain

3. How common is it in Australia?

Very

4. What is the average lifespan?

12- 14yrs

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Exubriant,Loyal,Merry ,

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

As much as u want to give ,just as happy lounging around as running through the fields .

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Yes providing you let the pup know who is boss from day 1 .

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Better with a companion(.bit like pretzals can't have just one )

9. How much grooming is required?

Lots , they r not a wash & wear dog & require regular brushing to keep coats free of knots .& special attention must be paid to keeping air way free around ears,& triming hair between pads of feet .

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Not if trained correctly

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

PRA F/N

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Health tests,bothparents clear of PRA& F/N.,How he pup was raised .Check tempremant of both parents.

Edited by Cockerlover

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kitty   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

first time owner :eek:

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

very very happy dogs, that love a cuddle, and love to play. She has a nice stable personality, and I've found my girl very loyal, and very sweet tempererd.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

as a first time owner, i can say that we were (and still are) quite impressed with how good our girl has been. I think personally the grooming is the hardest part to get used to. She does give us the irresistable cocker sad face, so as with any other puppy, a firm but fair hand is required.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Our girl is not a solo dog, but for the first month, she didn't spend any unsupervised time alone with our other dog. She coped really well, as long as i left her toys. However, i think she is much happier having a play mate.

9. How much grooming is required? we brush ours every night, clean her eyes & ears 1-2 times a week

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)? i have found our girl to be great with kids. she loves them, and they love her.

Edited by kitty

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MTD   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

first time cocker owner ( pet)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

14th century when there were two sorts of spaniels , the land spaniels and the water spaniels . The land spaniel then divided , some become toys, the others became workers in the field. The smaller land spaniels where then divided into 2 groups "starters" and "cockers" . Starters spring the game, whereas cockers were specially bred to hunt the woodcock .

3. How common is it in Australia?

Quite common but not as much as in the 70's when they were very popular.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Merry, Loyal and affectionate

A very happy breed in which the bum doesn't stop wriggling and the tail can still wag whilst the rest of the body is in sleep mode .

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Maggie is as happy having a run in the park ( nose to the ground sniffing out all that had come before her ), on my lap or asleep on "her" recliner

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Yes I think so, As long as you are aware that they do need training especially when food is involved and can get dominant. They are much more intelligent than people think and can really get you sucked in with the big "soppy" eyes

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

I think so , but I think they would prefer to have a friend.

I have had no problems with leaving Maggie with Molly ( pom/chi) for long periods . She has never chewed anything except her own toys. As long as I remember to put the bin or any food out of reach.

9. How much grooming is required?

Not a lot but you have to be committed .Maggie as a pet cocker gets a 5-10 min brush daily and I clip the body about every 4 weeks (leaving just the feathers on the ears, legs and chest so at least she looks like a cocker :eek: ) . Not hard really once you get the hang of things. There are quite a few sites that have excellent "instructions" or just find yourself a breeder who is willing to show you.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Not at all if trained.

One thing that has to be supervised or best never let children feed cockers. It is probably the worst thing that happens is kids feed the dog and soon the dog will learn that it is easy to get food from a child by jumping up and taking it.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

As already said.

But also I would like to add Hip dyslasia. Not very common but it is there. Not much testing is done and that is fine as it is rare but there are some lines with it in and you should be aware of it .

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Testing of parents for FN . PRA

It is also worth asking if any Hip Dyslasia has ever occured in the breeders lines :(

Edited by MTD

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

first time pet owner.

Oi is a blue roan and has been part of our family for 3.5 years now (coming from a breeder). I also have Orson (a gold) but he is not a pedigree.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Very merry, affectionate and loyal. Though I'm sure a few owners will agree that they can betray you if there's food involved!

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Oi is very happy to lounge all day on her pillow/lounge but just as happy to go for walks with her nose on the ground. Obviously it depends on the individual Cocker....some will need more exercise, some don't need a lot. I think the dynamics of the household factors a little bit on the circumstances.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Yes, as long as you're prepared to do the training and not give into their gorgeous eyes. Just be prepared by researching a little and ensuring that Cockers is the breed for you.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Yes they can. Please be aware though that Cocker Spaniels are not outdoors only dogs. Cockers are very affectionate and loves to be around you.

9. How much grooming is required?

Different Cockers have different coats and some requires more/less but I believe 5-10 minutes daily would be a good routine to get into :eek: They can be easily trained to let you brush them while you're watching TV etc so it doesn't have to be a chore.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Nope. I used to work at an After School Care centre and I used to take Oi and Orson (Orson is not a pedigree) to my work on my days off. There were no problems at all and the kids loved them. I let the kids take the leads but was always close by.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

PRA

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Testing for PRA and Hip Displasia (HD)

For people who are looking to getting a Cocker Spaniel to join their family, my advice is do your research thoroughly - go to a couple of dog shows and talk to different breeders, seek out references about the breeders you are planning to approach (that may be from people who have gotten dogs from these breeders etc). Take the time as it is an important decision for you and your family.

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QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

We've always had cockers as family dogs but now I have one of my very own!!

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

If mine is anything to go by they are Happy, Friendly, Always up to Mischief and can make you laugh very easily

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

My Jesie needs at least 40 minutes a day but longer if I'm up to it. She never sleeps! :(

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Definately!!!!!!

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

I think its best that they have a companion, they love people. We got our cocker a puppy of her own! :laugh:

Cockers love people and need to be an inside dog, part of the family. An all round lovely dog

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Ashanali   

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

My mother and grandfather are cocker spaniel breeders and exhibitors. I have always been around them as long as I can remember.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Merry!

9. How much grooming is required?

Just wanted to jump in here to add something... People tend to forget about teeth and general maintenance of fur around the mouth. I have groomed soooo many cockers (when I did grooming a few years ago) who had foul breath from rotting teeth and also the little pockets around the mouth and lips where food had collected and been neglected. Cocker owners need to keep an eye on their dogs teeth and if their breath starts to smell, check teeth and also check all the little crevices around their lips.

And ears... if you aren't prepared to clip the ears and keep them short, ensure they are brushed everyday. It only takes a day for large matts to develop and these can be painful for the dog if not attended to.

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MTD   

You are right Ashanali with the folds around the mouth.

I wipe the mouth / lip area with apple cider vingar and this makes kisses more pleasurable .

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Ashanali - I never knew this about cockers. Thanks! My Jesie' breath is pretty good but will be checking in future

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Toohey   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Breeder, exhibitor, owner.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Spaniels have been around for several centuries but Cockers were first recognised as a separate breed in England in 1893, differentiated from other spaniels by size and named for their function of flushing Woodcock.

3. How common is it in Australia?

Cockers are a very common and popular breed in Australia.

4. What is the average lifespan?

12- 14 years

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

The temperament of a well bred cocker is typically delightful. They live up to their "merry' tag extremely well. They are generally full of love and life, very eager to please and very devoted to their owner/family. They thrive on companionship and need to be included in family activities. Even just a car ride to the shop will make their day!

Cockers are renowned for the ability to wag from the waist down and some are also quite chatty and love to talk to you in their own special way. They are not typically barkers, but do give a warning bark if the doorbell rings or there are unusual noises outside. Some cockers do need a firm hand, and obedience training is highly recommended with this breed.

A term which some may have heard - "cocker rage' is a very rare condition, that is sometimes wrongly attributed to cockers who have been poorly bred and/or badly raised. Cocker rage is a medical conditon characterised by a sudden, dramatic, and complete change of personality and associated aggression. There is more info to be found here. http://members.lycos.co.uk/ragesyndromeinfo/whatisrage.htm

Rest assured that if you buy from an ethical and responsible breeder (as with any breed) you will have no problems.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Cockers thrive on a good off lead run of up to an hour a day. They love to swim, and any exercise involving water, trying to chase birds, and exploring exciting off lead areas, will keep the average cocker very content and happy. If that is not possible, a ball and a strong arm in the back yard should suffice.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

IF they get plenty of assistance with grooming from either their breeder or a professional groomer in the first year or two. Pups need to be started with grooming early to get them used to it, as it will be a life long and regular practice. Cockers can matt quickly and become uncomfortable if not groomed regularly and properly. Grass seeds can go un detected in heavy coats, so if you can't maintain the coat, consider having them clipped off every 8-10 weeks.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

No. They do best with company.

9. How much grooming is required?

Regular grooming involving a brush and comb all over is needed at least once every two days. As the puppy coat comes down from about 7-8 months onwards, the coat will need stripping to remove the fluff and general tidying up. Feet should be trimmed to remove excess hair, especially from beneath the paw pads, and the foot should be trimmed around to look tidy and give the impression of a cat's paw. Ears need to be free from hair and fur around the base of the ear should be clipped with a number ten blade to allow air to circulate and prevent ears getting moist and mucky which is how ear infections begin. Once the adult coat comes in the dog will need regular clipping or stripping with a stripping tool such as the Coat King. Some coats can get quite woolly after the dog is desexed.

Mouths need to have the fur clipped closely to prevent food trapping and possible lip fold infections.

You will find if you brush your dog every day that they there will be no shedding, or very little. The coat being long and silky, is not one that is prone to much shedding.

As with all dogs, nails need attention, including dew claws if they are left on.

If you don't own clippers, perhaps consider investing in a set and learning to keep your cocker tidy yourself. You will save a lot of money in the long run. You will need at the very least, basic grooming tools such as a slicker brush, a metal comb, and scissors.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

It would depend on the child, and how well trained the dog is. Cockers can be very boisterous and excitable by nature, and love to jump up on people. They also have the tendency of being right where you are planning to put your foot down as you walk, and weave between your legs as you walk.

One of my pups was placed specifically to grow up with the baby and they are great mates, partners in crime even!

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Most common is PRA - Progressive Retinal Atrophy, but this can be avoided with the use of DNA testing. Please ensure both parents were tested and at least one is clear.

Carriers can only produce affected pups if both parents are carrier or one is affected and one is a carrier. There is no issue with buying a pup who may be a carrier. This will in no way affect the health of the pup, BUT if you intend to breed, you need to be sure the chosen mate is clear.

PRA will generally have an onset at 4-7 years of age, the dog will develop night blindness and will progress eventually to total blindness. It is not painful, and most dogs usually cope well if kept in the same environment with the same routine.

Familial Nephropathy otherwise known as FN or AHRN (Autosomal Hereditary Recessive Nephropathy ). This disease is rare, but there ARE carriers in Australia and responsible breeders will test parents for this. It is a deadly disease with no treatment where pups typically die in their first year, and up to two years of age.

Then there are other forms of kidney disease such as Renal Dysplasia. This is a totally separate disease from FN but the effects are just as serious and the outcome the same. There is no test for this disease, but research is underway in Sweden using tissue from affected dogs to find the gene responsible.

Do your research carefully and choose a responsible breeder as anyone who has seen this disease in their lines should NOT breed on with dogs who have produced it.

Hip Dysplasia used to be seen frequently in Cockers, but is not often seen now thanks to careful breeding. Hip Dysplasia is thought to be polygenic - caused by factors other than genetics, including environment and diet.

Epilepsy is considered hereditary in the breed, but not commonly seen.

Eye conditions such as cherry eye and entropian is also seen occasionally in cockers. Always check the pups for nice tight rims and clear eyes when assessing a litter.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Ask the breeder if they have older dogs of the same lines and if you can meet them. Go with your gut instincts in regards to whether these dogs are happy, healthy, and typical examples of the breed.

DNA testing - ask the breeder if the parents are tested. If the breeder says no or refuses to answer, find another breeder. As already stated, one carrier parent is acceptable. If parents are untested, or one is tested a carrier and the other untested, find another breeder.

Be sure to ask the breeder about the temperaments of their dogs, and if there are any other health issues such as hip dysplasia in the lines.

Ask your breeder what activities they participate in with their cockers. Those who show usually demonstrate an interest in improving the breed by learning amongst peers, and having their dogs assessed by judges against others of the breed, and by doing so they are ensuring their stock best meets the breed standard.

Others may participate in other endeavours such as obedience, agility and tracking. They are definitely a highly versatile breed.

Victorian Cocker people may find more info on our club site http://www.cockerspanielclubvic.org/ including how to source a quality registered pup.

Edited by Toohey

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rachiie   

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I am a first-time owner.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Fairly sure this one's been answered in enough depth. :D

3. How common is it in Australia?

Quite common, though I have people who think he's a springer spaniel. I also have other people who haven't seen a cocker with long hair... :thumbsup:

4. What is the average lifespan?

I believe it's approx. 14 years.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Just gorgeous. Loving, snuggly, funny, always happy, adorable. Tail is always wagging and a doggy grin is never far away.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

A good run each day.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I definitely think so. My boy has never been as mischievous as other breeds I've owned, and he can make anybody love him - even non-dog lovers.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

No. They love (read: need) company.

9. How much grooming is required?

Lots! Luckily I enjoy it and love spending the time with my pooch.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

N/A. Have no children, so cannot comment.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Also answered sufficiently previously.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

As above.

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Guest acb123   
Guest acb123

bump so I can keep referring to this page while I try to buy dog products that suit this breed! :o (e.g. height of dog for crate purchase etc)

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MTD   

Maggies crate is 92cm x 60.7cm x 68cm . It is a wire collapsible one.

It is heaps big enough for her to stretch out when asleep , do twirlies ect

She did have a soft crate which was smaller and she really wasn't happy in it . Much happy in the wire one.

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Guest acb123   
Guest acb123

Thanks MTD! I found one with the same dimensions on Deals Direct! :thumbsup:

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ncarter   

i have a question relating to cockers. How well do cockers do as outside dogs? I know they were originally bred as gundogs and like being outside doing things. But I would have thought they are quite family orientated? I read something from Dr. Ark saying how they would be fine living outside in a UK winter and thought this was a bit fetched.

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MTD   

I am not an expert but from all the cockers I have known they just love being with the family.

If they are too be left outside you would need 2 , to keep each other company . Wouldn't think they would do well as a single dog and left outside without some misbehaving ( barking , digging, escaping )

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Have to agree with MTD ,cockers r very people orintaited ,they dont care what your doing !as long as they can be doing it with you .!!!not the sort of dog that u leave outside imo .

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