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Our very scared puppy


raineth
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I wonder if her transportation down to you might’ve terrified her and sort of imprinted on her brain. I don’t know how to describe it, but my puppy was a bit of a loner although liked trotting along with her outside I think, from what the breeder told me. 
when I got him flown down he was terrified and also completely shut down.  He improved fairly quickly but there’s some things I notice about him and I wonder if his natural temperament along with a frightening experience of being flown to a strange place and a person he didn’t know, at a sensitive and impressionable age might’ve influenced his behaviour.

do you think it’s possible something like this has affected your puppy too?

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55 minutes ago, Kirislin said:

I wonder if her transportation down to you might’ve terrified her and sort of imprinted on her brain. I don’t know how to describe it, but my puppy was a bit of a loner although liked trotting along with her outside I think, from what the breeder told me. 
when I got him flown down he was terrified and also completely shut down.  He improved fairly quickly but there’s some things I notice about him and I wonder if his natural temperament along with a frightening experience of being flown to a strange place and a person he didn’t know, at a sensitive and impressionable age might’ve influenced his behaviour.

do you think it’s possible something like this has affected your puppy too?


I think the flight definitely did not help for sure but I just don’t think it’s the only thing going on. If it was a one off experience and she had been well socialised I would have expected her to bounce back quicker. Instead we’re nearly three months on and my son can’t get within three metres of her and my daughter cannot get within patting distance. She’s just so scared of people in general. 
We have also met her litter mate and she is the same. We got them together and they were both so stressed that they didn’t even acknowledge each other’s presence.

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was waiting at mascot for a flight and watched the baggage train arrive with two dog crates as well on it. the driver parked it beside the plane and they began loading the luggage.  the plane parked in the bay beside it turned on its turbines and began to back up.   the noise must have been deafening to a human what it was to those two dogs would have been 1,000 fold and they were obviously terrified as the crates were rocking with the dogs efforts to escape, one almost rolled off the baggage train.  I hate to think of the trauma those two dogs went through. I could see the logo of the carrier on the crates and phoned them. they said once they are loaded on the baggage train the dogs are  out of their control once the baggage handlers have loaded them on the train to the planes. This needs to be rectified. apparently the dogs are always loaded last which means they are exposed to this way too long when it happens

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I'm so sorry you're going through this. 
Behavioural issues like this can be so hard to correct. 
Unfortunately it sounds like Penny will not ever be a happy confident dog. 

Several years ago I bought a 10wo Rotti pup. He was a handful from the get-go. 
He had chronic PICA so bad that I had to take him to toilet muzzled and on a lead. 
He treated life as one big game and would not take me seriously unless I stood over him and read him the riot act. 

Taking advice that dogs will often settle down by 18mo, I persevered with him. 
At 16mo he triggered a permanent back injury. I could barely walk and needed to be in hospital. 
Over three days I tried to find a kennel that could take him but as soon as I mentioned "60kg with behavioural issues" none were prepared to take him on. 

By the 3rd day my health had deteriorated where my GP ordered me to hospital [as it turned out I was also suffering from diverticulitis and a lung infection] I had no other choice but to put him to sleep. [No way could I have sent him to the pound - he was my responsibility] 

As hard as that was, although I loved the big lug, while laying in the hospital bed, I realised that I never really enjoyed him. He was just hard work. 
Although putting him to sleep was terribly distressing [which he thought was a big game] I felt relief that a load had been lifted from my shoulders. 
I did my best and gave him every chance.

Sadly, sometimes our best efforts are not enough. 
Once one has exhausted all avenues to rehabilitate, sending a dog to the rainbow bridge is the kindest act of all. 

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It would really annoy the hell out of me to think that this breeder had conned me , possibly if it had been returned conned someone else and been paid twice ,, i honestly would get all the info together ,   get a letter from my vet explaining  what the dog had , how long ect ect ,, document it all together with a list of phone calls , letters ,  ect ect ,, pay a couple of hunfdred dollars more and take them to the small claims crt , no lawyers allowed , just you and them and hopefully a judge who see's the breeder for what they are

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