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Dalmatian

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Troy   

The Dalmatian

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=186 )

Group: Group 7 (Non Sporting)

General Appearance: The Dalmatian should be a balanced, strong, muscular, active dog of good demeanour. Symmetrical in outline, free from coarseness and lumber, capable of great endurance with a fair amount of speed.

Characteristics: (See under General Appearance and Colour.)

Temperament: Of good demeanour.

Head And Skull: The head should be of fair length, the skull flat, reasonably broad between the ears but refined, moderately well defined at the temples, i.e. exhibiting a moderate amount of stop; not in one straight line from nose to occiput bone. Entirely free from wrinkle. The muzzle should be long and powerful, never snipy, the lips clean. fitting the jaw moderately close. The nose in the black spotted variety should always be black, in the liver spotted variety always brown.

Eyes: The eyes, set moderately well apart, should be of medium size, round, bright and sparkling, with an intelligent expression, their colour, depending on the marking of the dog; dark in the black spotted, amber in the liver spotted. The rim round the eyes should be complete; black in the black spotted and liver brown in the liver spotted.

Ears: The ears should be set on rather high, of moderate size, rather wide at the base, gradually tapering to a rounded point. Fine in texture, carried close to head. The markings should be well broken up, preferably spotted.

Mouth: The teeth should meet. The upper slightly overlapping the lower (scissor bite).

Neck: The neck should be fairly long, nicely arched, light and tapering. Entirely free from throatiness.

Forequarters: The shoulders should be moderately oblique, clean and muscular. Elbows close to the body. The forelegs perfectly straight with strong round bone down to the feet, with a slight spring at the pastern joint.

Body: The chest should not be too wide but deep and capacious with plenty of lung and heart room. The ribs well sprung, well defined wither, powerful level back, loins strong, clean and muscular, and slightly arched.

Hindquarters: Rounded, muscles clean with well developed second thigh, good turn of stifle and hocks well defined.

Feet: Round, compact, with well arched toes (cat-feet) and round tough elastic pads. Nails black or white in the black spotted variety, in the liver spotted - brown or white.

Tail: In length reaching approximately to the hocks. Strong at the insertion gradually tapering towards the end, it should not be inserted too low or too high, be free from coarseness and carried with a slight upward curve, never curled. Preferably spotted.

Gait/Movement: The Dalmatian should have great freedom of movement. A smooth, powerful rhythmic action with a long stride. Viewed from behind, the legs should move in parallel, the hindlegs tracking the fore. A short stride and paddling action is incorrect.

Coat: The coat should be short, hard and dense, sleek and glossy in appearance.

Colour: The ground colour should be pure white. Black spotted dogs have dense black spots and liver spotted dogs liver-brown spots. They should not run together but be round and well defined, the size of a FIVE to a TWENTY CENT COIN, as well distributed as possible. Spots on the extremities should be smaller than those on the body.

Sizes: Overall balance of prime importance, but the ideal height to be aimed at is:

Dogs 58-61 cms (23-24 ins.),

Bitches 56-58 cms (22-23 ins.).

Faults: Blue eyes.

Patches. Black and liver spots on the same dog (tricolours).

Lemon spots. Bronzing and other faults of pigmentation.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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espinay2   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Have owned one Dalmatian who passed away at 13 years of age. Cared for a number of others at various times. Past committee member and Secretary of the Dalmatian Club of the ACT.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

The origin of the breed is lost in time with depictions of spotted dogs dating back to Egyptian and Mycenaen civilisations. 'Country of Development' is England and this is where they gained their popularity as carriage dogs, accompanying and guarding the horses and carriages on the road and in the stables.

3. How common is it in Australia?

The breed is reasonably popular, gaining popularity in the 90's with the release of the '101 Dalmatian' movies. That was a period of hard work for the breed clubs working hard to prevent impulse buying. ANKC registrations in the 90's averaged about 1000 pups per year. Registrations have declined over the last decade and in the last few years have only been about 550 to 600 per year.

4. What is the average lifespan?

They can be reasonably long lived with many living to 13 years of age or more.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

A loving and friendly dog which can be a bit of a 'diva' at times. They enjoy the comforts of the couch as much as they enjoy activity. They can be strong willed and love their food, which can be useful for training using positive rewards. They can have a short attention span at times, which has occasionally given them the reputation of being 'ditzy', but given a reason to focus they are incredibly smart and pick things up very quickly. They are well known for their 'smile' which some can mistake for aggression as it looks likethey are baring their teeth. They can also be persistent 'talkers' and tend to tell the world their troubles if they feel they need attention. They are a breed that needs to live close to their owners and be part of the family.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

They are an endurance breed so love to run. They are a great dog to take jogging or bike riding. They have a fairly high energy level and tend to need a reasonable amount of exercise to burn this off. They enjoy sports like Agility. But at the end of the day they will love curling up with you on the couch just as much as going for a run with you.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

They need a resonably good leader though many first time dog owners could cope depending on the personality of the owner. Training is essential as they can become destructive problem dogs if not given the right guidance.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

They tend to do better with companionship and can become destructive and disruptive if bored.

9. How much grooming is required?

Minimal grooming is needed to look after their short coat, though they do tend to shed more than you would expect. the short hairs stick into everything!

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Yes, they can be a bit too boisterous at times and younger dogs in particular need to be carefully supervised around the young and infirm as they may unintentionally knock them over. That wagging tail can be a hazard too!

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Deafness is present in Dalmatians. Dalmatians can also be prone to producing uric acid in their urine (a rather unique trait) which can lead to the creating of crystals and stones in the bladder. Males are more prone to this than females. To lessen the effects and reduce uric acid a Dalmatian generally needs a diet lower in purines (a form of protein). Known stone formers need a more modified diet to ensure they do not recur. Both Deafness and Uric acid issues are not as common now fortunately, but are still something breeders need to be aware of and actively work to avoid.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

The breeder should be asked about deafness in particular - all breeders should check the pups for deafness. The code of ethics of the Dalmatian Clubs require that bilaterally deaf puppies (deaf in both ears) be humanely euthanased. Breeders may or may not BAER test puppies for deafness - it is preferred, but access to testing can be an issue for some. BAER testing can identify if a pup has full hearing is deaf in one ear only (unilateral deafness) or deaf in both (bilateral).

Note that some puppies may have 'patches' on their coat. this is a patch of colour which the dog is born with rather than developin later like normal spots. the hair on patches is a slightly different texture. A dog with a patch can not be shown or bred from, but it does not affect its ability as a family pet.

post-5072-1251286169_thumb.jpg

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Spot.   

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Owner.

2. What is the general temperament/personality?

I describe dallies as happy or enthusiastic :thumbsup: I find my dalmatian to be very affectionate. She also loves being close and observing my daily activities. Dallies are natural clowns and will always have you laughing at something silly they do. They need a firm and consistent leader and need to have their boundaries set and made clear from the day they come home.

3. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

My dally needs about 30-40 mins. I find walking sufficient enough for Mia. She also loves fetch, so we do a lot of that. It depends on the owner and their lifestyle. The dalmatian usually adapts to that.

4. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Yep. Just be firm.

5. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

I would say yes, if they are given the correct amount of stimulation to keep themselves entertained. If I plan to be out all day I will walk Mia before I leave and give her a bone and a treatball. She sleeps all day...

6. How much grooming is required?

Once a week I give my dal a brush with a Zoom Groom. Whilst this doesn't eliminate shedding, it helps keep their coat nice.

7. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

This depends on the individual dog, their temperment and their training. But they are excitable dogs and may accidentally knock over a small child.

I have found my dalmatian to be excellent with children of all ages. She adores my nephews (aged 1 and 2) and is very gentle with them. She follows them around observing everything they do and plays endless games of fetch, even though the ball only gets thrown 5 cms :) The tail is one thing to look out for!

Happy dalmatian :D

chick1.jpg

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I'll bite :(

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I am a first time owner of this wonderful breed but have a lot of experience with dogs. I have a black-spotted entire male, Ziggy (Yarrowfell High Society) who I show (occasionally) and compete with in obedience. We are training for jumping/agility trials and intend to do the endurance test and tracking when time permits!

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Here's a quote from the Dalmatian Club of Victoria regarding the history of the breed:

The History of the Dalmatian

We are still not absolutely sure of the exact origin of the Dalmatian. The most reliable of sources suggests he originated in the eastern Mediterranean from where he spread to India and over Europe. Some suggest he did this while travelling with gypsies. The name suggests the breed came from Dalmatia, but researchers have found this wasn't the case. The name Dalmatian did come relatively late in his history approximately around the late 1790's, but there are records of spotted dogs in paintings, sketchings and artifacts dated well before this time. The so called then spotted dog was seen beside war chariots and with all types of horse drawn carriages, This is probably how he received his second name The Carriage Dog. During the centuries he was used as a guard dog, war dog, faithful companion, coach dog and a mascot for the horsedrawn fire engines. The Dalmatian will gait with horses for many miles. And this is something he has a natural affinity for.

3. How common is it in Australia?

I'm not sure of the exact numbers but there were some unfortunate repercussions from the 101 Dalmatians series of movies. Their stunning and unique appearance led to the production of puppies by less than reputable breeders with little consideration for health or temperament. It did nothing for the reputation of the breed and a number were surrendered to shelters/rescue.

4. What is the average lifespan?

Around 12 - 14 years.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Class clown :laugh: A Dalmatian should be confident and well socialised and have a madly wagging tail! In my experience Dallies are extremely intelligent......often more so than there owners, which can give them the reputation of being difficult to train or stupid (remember, people, we are supposed to be the one with the forebrain!!! It's very important to use it with a Dally!) I must admit that I, too, once thought Dals were stupid but was soon put right when I spoke with Zig's breeders for the first time. They can have a mind and will of their own so you must give them a very, very good reason to work with you. Loads of positive reinforcement (food!!!!) is the best way to go - I've found clicker training & shaping particularly beneficial. Even over-using the non-reward marker (removing a reward) can turn a Dally off very quickly. They can also become bored with repetitive training very, very rapidly and I also need to mix up the type and delivery of rewards more than I'm used to. He also has a rather short attention span so I have to slowly build mental endurance, particularly when he is learning something new. With maturity (some anyway :shrug: ), Ziggy is now starting to respond to verbal praise but it's nowhere near as effective as food. Having said all that, he is an absolute DELIGHT to train - lots of hard work has resulted in a dog who is focussed and enthusiastic. After owning an Australian Cattle Dog (competing in obedience & agility) the Dally is EXACTLY what I was looking for....a real challenge :laugh: When training a Dally, creativity is the key!

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

I give Zig an hour free running nearly every day. Mental stimulation is equally important - I do a few minutes of training daily, train at an agility club once a week plus compete on weekends. Obviously, as a larger breed, excessive exercise is not recommended until the dog is mature. Keep them fit and trim - there's nothing worse than an overweight Dalmatian!!!

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

A dog of my lad's temperament - I would say definitely not as he has been quite a handful, particularly as a teen. However, I selected him as a 5 week old pup - I spent several days observing him and his littermates and his characteristics were just what I was after for a sports dog. The ratbags are often the most fun to train :o There can be great variation between breeding lines and within a litter. I know of a number of Dallies who are much more laid back than Ziggy so I would always suggest that a potential buyer discuss their requirements with the breeder and ask their advice.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Ziggy is an only dog and has survived very well. However, as mentioned he has lots of mental stimulation and exercise plus I have been fortunate to work from home quite a bit. He has the company of 3 cats, the youngest of which (6 months old) is now his very best friend. He happily sleeps the day away snuggled up in his smart coat in the sun next to the central heating vent once he has had a good gallop. Dals left to their own devices will probably become bored and thus very destructive and escape artists. Dalmatians love to be inside with their human (and feline!) family.

9. How much grooming is required?

Very little grooming is required with such a short dense coat - a rubber grooming mitt works well. I don't find much of a need to wash Ziggy either and his coat has no 'doggy smell'. However, it is commonly understood in the Dalmatian community that Dallies only shed twice a year.....six months in the autumn and six months in the spring :o If you don't feel like using a clothes brush daily or are precious about your carpets, please don't get a Dally!

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Dallies can be extremely active and boisterous and thus may be too much for the very young or frail, particularly as puppies and teenagers. However, I have seen well trained, older Dallies as beautiful companions for young children growing up.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

The main issues with Dals are deafness and a genetic uric acid anomaly (common to all Dalmatians) that can result in the production of urate stones. Dalmatians must be fed a low purine diet to reduce the incidence of this urinary stone that is peculiar to the breed i.e. chicken based meals and no organ meat (e.g. liver) amongst other things. More reading to be found at the Dalmatian Club of America.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Puppies should be BAER tested for hearing before being homed. Puppies that are deaf in one ear (uni-lateral hearing) make perfectly good pets but should not be bred from. Breeders that are members of their state breed club are not permitted to sell completely deaf puppies under the code of ethics. Consideration should also be given to eye and hip testing. Find a breeder who you are really comfortable with - their support and advice throughout the life of your Dally will be invaluable!

DSC01849.jpg

Edited by The Spotted Devil

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QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

First Time Owner of the breed 2nd time owner of a dog - Have black spotted dalmatian, female desexed - her name is Micky :thumbsup: people always think she is a boy cos they think she is quite solid/tall for a female. We have had her since she was 5 weeks old.

4. What is the average lifespan?

Ive seen information that says they live 10-12 years, others state 11-13yrs.

Micky is 13 in November.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Inquisitive, cheeky, eager to please, stubborn and strong willed, silly, charismatic and likeable, sociable. They smile :thumbsup: Love their food, best bribe in the world lol! Anything that smells interesting that falls on the ground is fair game, although Micky likes to bury bread rolls - but doesnt do it when you wet them. When they have done the wrong thing, they almost look sorrowful and guilty and they sulk lol. lick everyone and everything, and i dont know if its specific a dally trait or my dog, but her greeting is nose in your crotch and she wont let up untill you let her do it lol.

I've also had many a mexican standoff with Micky around the pool fence when she is being stubborn and knows im going to wash her or scold her lol.

With the clown/silly side of them, ive seen Micky run into things, trip over her own paws, not see where she was running, get noseful of water when running into water and it suddenly gets deep.

As Micky has gotten older shes sticking more and more to my side when we are outside and likes to lie in the grass and watch me put the washing on the line. Even though she was very ill in July - she still runs around a bit, although she does alot of sleeping.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

a fair amount, they can run and run and when taken off leash micky has spent most of her time running back and forth in zig zag fashion accross the park while i walk in a straight line lol. Ive stopped taking Micky on frequents walks becuase the last walk i took her on was 20 mins and she was exhausted for half of it - due to her being ill back in July. If its cold she might get a walk, but she does alot of sleeping these days.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I think so, if you are patient and looking for a charismatic dog with personality to burn, and can deal with the stubborness and have time to train them.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

When they are younger not so much - much washing was pulled off the line to be played with or layed on, however given enough toys and not leaving things you dont want chewed with them helps. The do get bored, but once they know the rules they can amuse themselves as long as its not days on end. a good few hours though they are fine, and the older they get the easier they amuse themselves and not destroy things hehe.

9. How much grooming is required?

A good decent brush every so often if they are an outside dog, as often as needed if they are inside.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

when Micky was a puppy she used to lie on the ground around babies and toddlers and let them poke and prode her to their hearts content. As she got older she hasnt been around them so much.

Since dallys are easily excited i suppose it comes down to individual temperament of the dog. but i know lots of patting by me when she is around new people does wonders.

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Wow not much information on here is there! :driving:

Maybe a page everyday on what Taite gets up to might help bring forth the animation of a Dally! ;)

post-8908-1270384249_thumb.jpg

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Hey Dalmatian owners, hopefully some of you will still read this thread.

In the next three or four years, I'd like to think about getting a show pup. I'm wanting to stay within the Spitz type dogs, however OH loves Dalmatians and so I said I'd look into them.

How do you think a Dalmatian would get along with a Sibe? Do you think they'd be able to understand the Spitz personality? Also are they talkative, or fairly quiet dogs?

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Sayly   

Whiskedaway, my boss is the president of the Dally Club of SA, next time you are out at a show I would be more than happy to introduce you. She is simply the nicest person I have ever had anything to do with and is more than happy to talk about Dallies with anyone! Her Dals are so sweet!

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Hey Dalmatian owners, hopefully some of you will still read this thread.

In the next three or four years, I'd like to think about getting a show pup. I'm wanting to stay within the Spitz type dogs, however OH loves Dalmatians and so I said I'd look into them.

How do you think a Dalmatian would get along with a Sibe? Do you think they'd be able to understand the Spitz personality? Also are they talkative, or fairly quiet dogs?

Whilst I'm not familiar with Spitz breeds, I can't see a problem if you introduce a puppy - my Dalmatian's best friend is a slightly manic foster failure kitten with one eye :eek:

My Ziggy is incredibly quiet - didn't bark until he was 6 months old (and scared himself stupid :laugh:), is inside most of the time and only alarm barks. He does have the most incredibly loud, mouth gaping yawn though ;) :rofl:

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Whilst I'm not familiar with Spitz breeds, I can't see a problem if you introduce a puppy - my Dalmatian's best friend is a slightly manic foster failure kitten with one eye :laugh:

My Ziggy is incredibly quiet - didn't bark until he was 6 months old (and scared himself stupid ;)), is inside most of the time and only alarm barks. He does have the most incredibly loud, mouth gaping yawn though :rofl: :rofl:

Has Ziggy been around talkative dogs? If he has, how does he go? (Akira tells the whole world what she's thinking :rofl:)

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I just watched the dogs 101 segment on this breed.

They mention that dalmatians can be 'selectively deaf' or have their ears 'painted on'

Would any owners agree with this statement?

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I just watched the dogs 101 segment on this breed.

They mention that dalmatians can be 'selectively deaf' or have their ears 'painted on'

Would any owners agree with this statement?

My Cleo definately has her selective moments!

Although she listens to me most of the time now (I'm definately her Alpha) she used to be more selective and even now she ignores my father in law and sometimes my parter too.

She always comes when she's called though too! I am so grateful for that (she's 5 and a half months)

I find that segment kinda only grazes over the "health issues" and special diet! I'm already so careful of what Cleo eats to avoid kidney stones, as I see it,it can't be harmful to be careful.

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I just watched the dogs 101 segment on this breed.

They mention that dalmatians can be 'selectively deaf' or have their ears 'painted on'

Would any owners agree with this statement?

I imagine some of this sentiment arises from the lack of BAER testing for Dalmatians in the past - the expression of the piebald gene that gives them their unique spotting also predisposes them to deafness. Good breeders should BAER test puppies and not breed from dogs with uni-lateral or bi-lateral deafness.

As to the nature of the breed, they are not one to hang on your every word unless you make it VERY worth their while. I use food and tug and I'm very consistent. Ziggy wasn't the easiest of adolescents but he has taught me to think outside the square when it comes to training. Last week I called him off a kangaroo with simply a "Ziggy! Come!" in a bright voice. He had bolted off out of sight but came sprinting back within seconds.......I didn't even have food on me :)

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I should update this thread as there are a number of Dallies doing very well around Australia in Obedience and Agility....here's one we prepared earlier ;)

Yarrowfell High Society CD AD JDX

DSC04266.jpg

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc) Have had 2 when I was growing up now a 1st time owner

4. What is the average lifespan? The family's first dally lived 15 years

5. What is the general temperament/personality? Stubourn, social, goof ball

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult? I would say 2 hours

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with? I dont think they are the easiest of breeds for a first time dog owner

9. How much grooming is required? Little grooming, once a week brush over

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)? I believe so

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of? Deafness is a main one

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be) make sure you ask the breeder is the dogs are BAER tested and if they are registered with the Dalmatian Club

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Purdie   

Are there many Liver spotted Dalmatians about these days ? I haven;t seen one for many years.Is there any differances in temperament or health or size between the liver and black.

What is the BAER test and what is it for,? What age can pups be checked for deafness ? Thankyou..

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Are there many Liver spotted Dalmatians about these days ? I haven;t seen one for many years.Is there any differances in temperament or health or size between the liver and black.

What is the BAER test and what is it for,? What age can pups be checked for deafness ? Thankyou..

Livers are actually more popular now then they ever have been, there is no more health risks, temperament differences or size differences associated with livers that dont apply to blacks, BAER is known as the brainstem auditory evoked response which is the dogs ability to interpret sound, they get tested at 6 weeks at earliest and if the breeder is a member of NSW dalmatian club then they do have a code of ethics to ad bide by if the pups are born deaf, uni-lateral hearing pups are totally fine as pets and can be sold but not bred from.

Another health concern for the dally are stones.

Edited by GussysMum

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